4

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NAC or straight to Glutathione?

Asked on June 17, 2015
Created September 09, 2011 at 9:50 PM

I'm working on fixing my PCOS and trying to get my insulin resistance under control. NAC (n-acetylcysteine) is often prescribed for this and seems to work even better than Metformin according to the studies listed in this article: http://www.ovarian-cysts-pcos.com/pcos-news140.html#sec1

However, NAC is a precursor to glutathione, and that is also available as a supplement. Is there a benefit to having my body manufacture it from the NAC? Is straight glutathione destroyed in the digestive process?

The other thought is, do I even need to worry about this if I just stick with nose to tail clean eating with good doses of coconut oil?

A64ed062eb5e2c3407122fcf16c5de6b

(715)

on July 10, 2012
at 10:39 PM

With "food" Paul means average intake on the Perfect Health Diet, especially when eating a quarter pound of beef/lamb liver weekly. In the mean time he also decreased his selenium supplementation recommendation to 100µg and may drop it completely, blog posts in preparation apparently.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 10, 2011
at 01:26 AM

Dude! That was the answer I was looking for. Thanks. Anything that comes with gluten attached to it would be no friend to my gut, good to know. I've had weird/bad reactions to whey in protein powder before, but then again I do seem to be sensitive to dairy products, so that probably explains that. I'll look into the pulmonary hypertension with NAC, that doesn't sound like something to mess around with. I wonder if that was something that occurred mostly at higher doses with IV use?

957a563c7e4a165663fd3c71207c39da

on September 10, 2011
at 01:03 AM

This statement is far too general: "Food typically provides 15 mg zinc and 1 mg copper." What food is being referred to and what amount? It makes no sense. Also, many foods are much higher in copper than they are in zinc (avocado and cacao are just two) so if the aim is to increase zinc, then one must be smarter about food choices.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on September 10, 2011
at 12:58 AM

Glutathione is barely absorbed when eaten. They manufacture a form of glutathione that comes wrapped in... gluten to help increase intestinal permeability. I would steer clear of that stuff and stick with NAC. Be mindful, however, of its side effects -I recall there were concerns about pulmonary hypertension (should be easy for you to look up). Whey may be a good substitute as it also upregulates glutathione, but it also is fairly insulinogenic and I just don't know enough about PCOS to say whether that would likely be a concern.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on September 09, 2011
at 10:59 PM

Yeah I take zinc picolinate all the time without food with no problems. You could also eat oysters in between meals.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 09, 2011
at 10:36 PM

I agree with you that letting my body decide how much glutathione to make is probably a good idea. That leads me to wonder though if there are any digestive states in which someone would have trouble making that conversion?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 09, 2011
at 10:11 PM

Thanks for the link, I think zinc is big piece of the puzzle here too. I know you mentioned a variety of zinc yesterday that didn't cause stomach upset, was it zinc picolinate? I've taken aqueous zinc at times (Biotics brand) and it has 2.3mg/dose, but boy it is pricey stuff with only 12 doses in a bottle.

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2 Answers

6
A64ed062eb5e2c3407122fcf16c5de6b

on September 09, 2011
at 10:16 PM

From The Jaminets:

The cure is simple: supplement. Specifically:

  • Selenium, 200 mcg/day (perhaps 400 mcg during a starting period). Selenium is needed for glutathione peroxidase, a glutathione recycling enzyme.
  • Vitamin C, 1 g/day (perhaps 4 g/day during a starting period). Vitamin C and glutathione recycle one another.
  • Zinc and copper. Total zinc intake should be 30-50 mg/day including food and multivitamin; copper intake should be 2-5 mg/day. Food typically provides 15 mg zinc and 1 mg copper.
  • Cysteine and glycine. These are the component amino acids for glutathione. For constipation I would suggest eating some beef gelatin for glycine, and taking one 500 mg capsule of N-acetylcysteine per day.

Egg yolks also increase glutathione production [3], and eating a dozen per week is highly recommended. Lipoic acid may also help. [4]

Glutamine, a supplement frequently recommended for gut ailments, can also enhance glutathione production [5]. However, I would generally avoid this, because it can promote proliferation of pathogenic bacteria.

Paul doesn't state if glutathione as a separate supplement is any good, perhaps you should ask him. I'm guessing that it's better to let the body decide how much glutathione to have based on the available precursors, than to just ram glutathione in there.

Actually, I'm going to up my glutathione levels through supplementation myself now that I read this again...

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 09, 2011
at 10:36 PM

I agree with you that letting my body decide how much glutathione to make is probably a good idea. That leads me to wonder though if there are any digestive states in which someone would have trouble making that conversion?

957a563c7e4a165663fd3c71207c39da

on September 10, 2011
at 01:03 AM

This statement is far too general: "Food typically provides 15 mg zinc and 1 mg copper." What food is being referred to and what amount? It makes no sense. Also, many foods are much higher in copper than they are in zinc (avocado and cacao are just two) so if the aim is to increase zinc, then one must be smarter about food choices.

A64ed062eb5e2c3407122fcf16c5de6b

(715)

on July 10, 2012
at 10:39 PM

With "food" Paul means average intake on the Perfect Health Diet, especially when eating a quarter pound of beef/lamb liver weekly. In the mean time he also decreased his selenium supplementation recommendation to 100µg and may drop it completely, blog posts in preparation apparently.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 09, 2011
at 10:11 PM

Thanks for the link, I think zinc is big piece of the puzzle here too. I know you mentioned a variety of zinc yesterday that didn't cause stomach upset, was it zinc picolinate? I've taken aqueous zinc at times (Biotics brand) and it has 2.3mg/dose, but boy it is pricey stuff with only 12 doses in a bottle.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on September 09, 2011
at 10:59 PM

Yeah I take zinc picolinate all the time without food with no problems. You could also eat oysters in between meals.

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