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Grass juices??? - Wheat, Barley, Spirulina, Chlorella, etc

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created August 04, 2011 at 1:20 PM

Ok, obviously they are not a food that was likely to be consumed much in paleo times, but we know they are gluten free (sprouted grass juices - the product I take has been tested gluten free). Who on here has an opinion of them? I feel an energy boost, skin looks clearer too. Are they really potentially better than regular veggies like brocolli, kale, etc.? Any other reason note to eat them (lectins, phytates)?

5023ff667ff05e524379ee3ecfbe9125

on February 01, 2013
at 10:21 PM

Sorry, but that's BS. You can't even get 10g of protein/day from spirulina without risking vitamin A toxicity. Plus, spirulina likely has similar harmful characteristics compared to those of chlorella.

33907fee54e98865a1988e5eef59147e

(480)

on August 06, 2011
at 02:18 AM

thanks - given the time that's gone by now, it doesnt look like many others know the answer we are looking for. i'm nearing the conclusion that we weren't meant to eat grasses...cows were. we eat other veggies. i notice some odd sides that occur with high intakes of them that you wouldnt expect from veggies

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3 Answers

2
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on March 27, 2012
at 09:53 PM

I think I'll pass eating it for the problems noted below.

There are celiacs that have responded poorly to barley grass and wheatgrass. If it is certified gluten-free then you should be okay in that way.

http://www.robbwolf.com/2012/01/19/trojan-horses-of-chlorella-superfood/ Trojan horses of Chlorella ???superfood???

Posted by Christopher on Jan 19, 2012 in Anti inflammatory diet, General | 58 comments By: Roman Sasik, Ph.D.

Chlorella is a genus of unicellular aquatic organisms that recently acquired a ???superfood??? status, in part because of its complete amino acid profile and a high omega-3 DHA and EPA fatty acid content. It has also been reported to lower blood pressure in humans, lower serum cholesterol, boost immunity, and even fight cancer.

It appears the superfood status of Chlorella is richly deserved. Even though Chlorella as an organism has been around for billions of years, for obvious reasons it could not have been a significant part of human diet and therefore it should be considerd an industrial-era food and should be treated with caution for this reason alone. It wasn???t until recently that we understood how Chlorella does its magic. In a 2002 paper, Armstrong et al. [1] discovered a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the cellular wall of Chlorella. LPS is an endotoxin found on the surface of all gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli or Salmonella and is a potent immune system activator. When LPS binds to receptors on the surface of macrophages (phagocytic cells of the innate immune system), it activates them and induces them to release pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1??, tumor necrosis factor TNF??, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-??B) [2]. Chlorella, in effect, puts our innate immunity on high alert via LPS, an endotoxin it happens to share with some lethal bacteria. Too much LPS leads to sepsis, which we would be well advised to avoid, but even low doses of Chlorella may be ill advised if they are chronic. While activated immune system may be beneficial in situations such as during an infectious disease outbreak, one must ask what happens to us when we make chlorella a regular part of diet, indeed, a food. Chronic exposure to LPS leads to chronic systemic inflammation, which is not a desirable state of affairs, as the readers of this blog know. Specifically, systemic LPS-activated macrophages in the brain have been implicated in progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and are responsible for Parkinson???s disease [3]. But wait! Isn???t Chlorella at the bottom of the aquatic food chain? Some hapless organism must be eating it, so why can???t we? It turns out that animals that eat algae in general, such as the horseshoe crab or shrimp, have evolved a mechanism, a unique protein, to bind and neutralize LPS. We have not. In the case of Chlorella we see another manifestation of a well-known evolutionary story, that of grains and birds that eat them, and people who eat the birds. People, unlike birds, do not do well when eating grains directly. It is the same with Chlorella, shrimp that eat it, and people who eat the shrimp.

If this were not enough to dissuade you from using Chlorella as food, there is also potential for contamination with viruses. Giant ones [4]. Normally, a virus contains genetic information of a handful of viral proteins. Chlorella viruses have more than three hundred genes, most of which encode proteins of unknown function. The potential for harmful interaction of these proteins with normal functioning of human cells is real. If the history of another fallen superfood of the recent past, that of Klamath Lake cyanobacteria, is any guide, I expect to hear a lot more about Chlorella viruses in the future. As the use of Chlorella for food increases under pressure from industrial producers and distributors, the likelihood of viral contamination increases as well. We would do well to stick to time-tested superfoods with a complete amino acid profile and high content of DHA and EPA ??? fish. People who for whatever reason refuse to get their DHA and EPA from animal sources would do well if they supplemented their diet with Chlorella-derived omega-3 fatty acids rather than by eating whole Chlorella. This is assuming that Chlorella fatty acid extracts are free of LPS and other toxic substances.

[1] Armstrong PB, Armstrong MT, Pardy RL, Child A, Wainwright N., Immunohistochemical demonstration of a lipopolysaccharide in the cell wall of a eukaryote, the green alga, Chlorella, Biol Bull. 2002 Oct;203(2):203-4.

[2] Hsu HY, Jeyashoke N, Yeh CH, Song YJ, Hua KF, Chao LK, Immunostimulatory bioactivity of algal polysaccharides from Chlorella pyrenoidosa activates macrophages via Toll-like receptor 4, J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Jan 27;58(2):927-36.

[3] Qin L, Wu X, Block ML, Liu Y, Breese GR, Hong JS, Knapp DJ, Crews FT, Systemic LPS causes chronic neuroinflammation and progressive neurodegeneration, Glia. 2007 Apr 1;55(5):453-62.

[4] Van Etten JL, Unusual life style of giant chlorella viruses, Annu Rev Genet. 2003;37:153-95.

1
5048b9a1f7b822d2bd3fd1aed92bfede

(10)

on August 05, 2011
at 09:32 PM

Nice post Chase - This is a subject i have pondered on for a while, i have been using all of the ones you have mentioned, not regularly every day but every other day with a few off, knowing all the "amazing" health benefits they have... The question is for me, can they be mixed together or would this be to much at once and at what quantities or not mixed at all, when is best to consume, quantities of each to be taken safely, side effects if any and any other relevant info on the subject if anyone has it. I would like to consume as much veg during the week as well, flash fried in a wok... You can never have too much of the good stuff :) Thanks. G

33907fee54e98865a1988e5eef59147e

(480)

on August 06, 2011
at 02:18 AM

thanks - given the time that's gone by now, it doesnt look like many others know the answer we are looking for. i'm nearing the conclusion that we weren't meant to eat grasses...cows were. we eat other veggies. i notice some odd sides that occur with high intakes of them that you wouldnt expect from veggies

0
Ebb4f3292e830141c9df9c27de47498e

on August 23, 2012
at 11:41 PM

The most widely used algae utilised in human meals are without doubt Spirulina. The great benefits ofthis blue-green algae are numerous and its nutrient opinions are actually awesome. In comparison with meats we are able to discover that it includes five times more required protein amounts and the degrees of vitamins and nutrients are extraordinary. We're able to buy spirulina in a number of sorts, through pills to powder.

Kids who don't consume fruit and veggies have definitely poor eating habits and spirulina is usually a big help here. Mothers-to-be, vegetarians, sportsmen can be helped by spirulina in various ways. On the contrary those who are sensitive to seafoods or are afflicted with thyroid problems are not advised start using spirulina.

With regards to the negative effects of spirulina, generally there aren’t almost any reported secondary effects in healthy and balanced men and women regardless of what amount of spirulina is ingested. Side Effects can be shown in folks who are sensitive to it as well as in the next few paragraphs we're going to see what are the secondary effects in those consumers.

Temperature is amongst the most popular secondary effects in individuals who are hypersensitive to it. The large variety of required protein amounts is the main reason for temperature. Being a lot more accurate, warmth is released when required protein amounts are broken in your body. Consequently there exists a fever. Temperature is normally associated with sleep problems.

Useful Resource : sideeffectsguide.org

5023ff667ff05e524379ee3ecfbe9125

on February 01, 2013
at 10:21 PM

Sorry, but that's BS. You can't even get 10g of protein/day from spirulina without risking vitamin A toxicity. Plus, spirulina likely has similar harmful characteristics compared to those of chlorella.

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