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Frizzy hair help

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 28, 2011 at 3:31 AM

During puberty, my hair became more curly/frizzy and I am looking for natural ways to tame it. In the last year, I have stopped using shampoo and have started supplementing fish oil. These changes have made my hair softer and leas dry. Do you guys have any suggestions in the way of dietary factors or supplements which might help?

Thanks

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 28, 2011
at 03:16 PM

Yeah really. Keep in mind, if taking a bath in Epsom salts allows them to be absorbed through your skin and into your blood, if nicotine patches allow nicotine to be absorbed through your skin into your blood, if Dramamine patches help you avoid sea-sickness, is it really wise to use "product" full of who knows what nasty toxins on skin and hair, knowing they'll also be absorbed?

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 28, 2011
at 01:20 PM

I've found coconut oil to be the best defrizzer ever!

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5 Answers

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3
Medium avatar

(4878)

on December 28, 2011
at 03:41 AM

Coconut oil! (Very, very little helps after you've straightened it, or a little more if you are letting it go curly.)

I had the same issue, too. Damn puberty!

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 28, 2011
at 01:20 PM

I've found coconut oil to be the best defrizzer ever!

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 28, 2011
at 03:16 PM

Yeah really. Keep in mind, if taking a bath in Epsom salts allows them to be absorbed through your skin and into your blood, if nicotine patches allow nicotine to be absorbed through your skin into your blood, if Dramamine patches help you avoid sea-sickness, is it really wise to use "product" full of who knows what nasty toxins on skin and hair, knowing they'll also be absorbed?

2
166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on December 28, 2011
at 04:02 AM

I think frizz is a symptom that your hair wants to be curly. If it needs a bit of help to be formed into curls, then style it with some product (my favored two methods below). Curly hair also doesn't need washing as much as straight hair; I only wash mine every 4 days or so, sometimes even longer. A hairnet at night helps it to keep the curls neat and tidy, and I highly recommend Lotta Body setting lotion as it's not greasy, heavy or sticky or hard, unlike other styling products. I had straight hair as a child and now have wavy/curly/frizzy hair. If I let it dry naturally it just turns into a massive lion's mane.

Since my hair straighteners broke I have embraced my curly hair and had it cut into slight layers that were easier to curl. To style it I either:

1) Put it into pin curls while damp and sleep like that, and then use some kind of serum or styling product in the morning when I take the pins out, or:

2) I put in some "Lotta body" styling lotion (diluted) and then twist strands around my fingers. Then I use a diffuser and tilt my head so the heat is coming up from the bottom, bunch my hair up in my hand to give it volume while keeping the curls intact, rather than creating limp curls by blowing the air from above.

Hope that helps!

1
Fc891327db916c10347b008acde0daca

(1022)

on December 28, 2011
at 10:49 AM

I have naturally Curls too, and my holy grail is a Mix out of 50% Cocoa Butter and 50% Almond Oil melted together. Take half a Walnut of that ( I have relatively long hair) and put it after washing in the towel-wet hair. After that, I also use Curling Foam, but that??s optional.

1
363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on December 28, 2011
at 04:33 AM

I have naturally curly hair that I used to straighten to make it easier to handle, but what I have learned over the years is this - shower at night, scrunch your hair with your towel, but allow ringlets to form - do not brush out. I warm up cocoa butter between my hands (much better than coconut oil in my experience - I have fine hair), just a tiny bit goes a long way, I touch it along the part, where tiny frizzies like to come up, and then I bend over and scrunch it with the traces of cocoa butter, and then I sleep on it, and my curls are bouncing the next day. Here is a video with my hair the day after this procedure: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdfDIkM2ju8 (forgive that this video mentions the master cleanse, this is just for the hair!! lol)

The next day, the curls are a little less bouncy and more subdued, but still present. Then by the 3rd and 4th day I am in pony tails usually, but I don't like to wash my hair more often than that unless I worked out hard.

1
0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on December 28, 2011
at 04:13 AM

Just my two cents: curly, frizzy, untamed hair is extremely attractive to me. I would definitely encourage eating enough good fats and washing it naturally, to ensure natural strength and shine - but other than that, have you considered accepting it as is?

Apologies that this might not be the most helpful suggestion. Consider the amount and quality of your fat intake, if you're intent on taming it - are you eating pastured butter, ghee, grass fed tallow, bacon, avocado, coconuts/oil and salmon regularly? The quality of my hair (and nails) has improved remarkably since going paleo.

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