1

votes

What to buy fresh at the Indian market...

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 12, 2012 at 8:13 PM

I have some frozen Lotus root I'm going to try. I've also tried Tindora and Kohlrabi before . What else is of particular interest, either with respect to taste or which are especially health?

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on May 15, 2012
at 06:08 PM

I've actually never had it cooked - always raw. Very thinly sliced and tossed with lemon juice, capers, a little fat - usually avocado oil, then over baby greens. Super good. Whole Foods has them all the time.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on May 14, 2012
at 02:42 AM

Good suggestion! I've tried Kohlrabi actually - it's good and you can eat it raw pretty easily. Unfortunately, they didn't have it when I was there last.

  • De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

    asked by

    (3747)
  • Views
    577
  • Last Activity
    1524D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

best answer

5
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on May 12, 2012
at 09:55 PM

Everything is of interest. If it catches your eye? Buy it. Talk to whoever is working in the market about how they would prepare your chosen item. That has never failed me in any of the markets that I've been in both in the US and outside. If I haven't seen it before.. I want it. And of course I have to add that if it's something that would impede your goals then don't go for it.

Have you played with Tamarind yet? Try that. Any of the gourds: Bitter/Snake/Dudhi. Custard Apple. Umm.. Sapota. Taro and curry leaves.

Note: Kohlrabi is pretty cool - here is some super nerd stuff for you:

Kohlrabi was apparently unknown anywhere more than a mere 400 to 500 years ago. It appears to be really new, and the only common vegetable, outside of brussels sprouts, of North European origin.

"Kohlrabi" Means "Cabbage Turnip"

"Kohlrabi" is a German word adopted without change into our language, Kohl meaning cabbage and Rabi meaning turnip. This "cabbage" with a turniplike enlargement of the stem above ground was apparently developed in northern Europe not long before the 16th century. The marrow cabbage from which it probably came is a cold-tender, nonheading plant with a thick succulent stem, while kohlrabi as we know it is a hardy vegetable, evidently developed in a cool climate.

The first description of kohlrabi was by a European botanist in 1554. By the end of the 16th century it was known in Germany, England, Italy, Spain, Tripoli, and the eastern Mediterranean. It is said to have been first grown on a field scale in Ireland in 1734, in England in 1837. In the United States, records of its use go back to 1806.

Like other members of the species B. oleracea, kohlrabi is a biennial-meaning that it requires parts of two growing seasons, with a cool rest period (wintertime) between, in order to produce seed.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on May 14, 2012
at 02:42 AM

Good suggestion! I've tried Kohlrabi actually - it's good and you can eat it raw pretty easily. Unfortunately, they didn't have it when I was there last.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on May 15, 2012
at 06:08 PM

I've actually never had it cooked - always raw. Very thinly sliced and tossed with lemon juice, capers, a little fat - usually avocado oil, then over baby greens. Super good. Whole Foods has them all the time.

1
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on May 12, 2012
at 10:14 PM

I buy stuff and figure out what to do with it later. That's how I found out that I love okra curries. And I got introduced to all sorts of crazy greens and different varieties of eggplant. I try to get something new every time I go to an international grocery. Have fun!

Oh- and look for fresh herbs/spices. I found fresh turmeric a while back and make turmeric tea all the time now.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!