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Why does my sunflower seed flour turn blue after baking?

Commented on August 05, 2014
Created August 05, 2014 at 3:17 PM

I use sunflower seed flour in place of almond flour due to allergies and every time I bake with it the finished product turns a dark blue color. I thought it was the blueberries I have used in most of my baking but I used apples the other day and the bread part is still dark blue. Why is that?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on August 05, 2014
at 10:47 PM

Supposedly it's all acid-base… too much baking soda pushes things alkaline and that induces oxidation.

852badac97e15f86afce6764a8e5a987

(0)

on August 05, 2014
at 10:15 PM

Thanks for the article. I guess I needed to pay more attention in my chemistry classes! LOL

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2014
at 09:28 PM

Via the interaction with the aluminum in the baking powder?

852badac97e15f86afce6764a8e5a987

(0)

on August 05, 2014
at 08:09 PM

Thanks. I will check that one out. I will also check out my label on mine to see what is in it.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2014
at 08:03 PM

Soaking is not needed, but good practice. I think some of the enzymes that are inhibited in raw sunflowers may contribute.

But the real answer is that the aluminum in baking powder can react to acidic ingredients, causing a blue or green discoloration. There are several brands of baking powder without aluminum (Bobs Red Mill is a fairly major brand).

852badac97e15f86afce6764a8e5a987

(0)

on August 05, 2014
at 07:57 PM

I went to a website that told how to make the flour and they didn't mention soaking and dehydrating them. I buy them ready to eat, just not salted and raw. As for the baking powder I do use normal baking powder. If that has aluminum in it I was unaware of it or the results of that. Is there a paleo baking powder? The recipes I use didn't specify anything different.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on August 05, 2014
at 05:29 PM

Thanks, I feel the same way. It sure helps to visualize things right? One picture is worth 1000 words.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2014
at 05:14 PM

+1 for the pretty picture. I like pictures. Paleohacks would be more fun if people posted pictures more often.

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4 Answers

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on August 05, 2014
at 08:56 PM

There's chlorogenic acid in it, see: http://www.ochef.com/1267.htm Chlorogenic acid oxidizes to form a green pigment.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2014
at 09:28 PM

Via the interaction with the aluminum in the baking powder?

852badac97e15f86afce6764a8e5a987

(0)

on August 05, 2014
at 10:15 PM

Thanks for the article. I guess I needed to pay more attention in my chemistry classes! LOL

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2014
at 05:15 PM

I am going to go out on a limb here and guess that:

1. You do not soak and dehydrate your seeds first

AND

2. You are using a baking powder with aluminum in it

852badac97e15f86afce6764a8e5a987

(0)

on August 05, 2014
at 07:57 PM

I went to a website that told how to make the flour and they didn't mention soaking and dehydrating them. I buy them ready to eat, just not salted and raw. As for the baking powder I do use normal baking powder. If that has aluminum in it I was unaware of it or the results of that. Is there a paleo baking powder? The recipes I use didn't specify anything different.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2014
at 08:03 PM

Soaking is not needed, but good practice. I think some of the enzymes that are inhibited in raw sunflowers may contribute.

But the real answer is that the aluminum in baking powder can react to acidic ingredients, causing a blue or green discoloration. There are several brands of baking powder without aluminum (Bobs Red Mill is a fairly major brand).

852badac97e15f86afce6764a8e5a987

(0)

on August 05, 2014
at 08:09 PM

Thanks. I will check that one out. I will also check out my label on mine to see what is in it.

0
852badac97e15f86afce6764a8e5a987

on August 05, 2014
at 03:30 PM

I am not sure. I buy raw seeds, unsalted and grind them myself. I haven't found a place that sells it already ground up. Maybe they are the blue variety. Thanks.

0
Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on August 05, 2014
at 03:22 PM

Well, if you're buying purple-sunflower-seed flour, then the anthocyanins will cause it to turn blue/purple depending on the pH, I think. Purple on the left, white on the right:

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2014
at 05:14 PM

+1 for the pretty picture. I like pictures. Paleohacks would be more fun if people posted pictures more often.

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