3

votes

Preventing freckling/sunburn

Commented on February 11, 2015
Created April 09, 2012 at 12:58 AM

What are some good ways to prevent sunburn and freckles and tan instead? I have heard coconut oil but am sort of scared to put it on my skin (isn't oil supposed to magnify light). I have very weird skin. Part of my face (along nose, and a little on cheeks under eyes) gets red and freckles, my chin and cheeks don't get affected at all (not really tan and no burn, no matter how long I'm outside) and my forehead actually gets kind of tan. It's so weird lol. Should I just use sunscreen on the burning/freckle area, or everywhere to prevent damage?

312537f2ecb216c830c3fd351efcfbbc

(110)

on July 24, 2013
at 05:49 PM

"you can't change your genetics" I think that you can change the amount of genes expressed with factors like diet, sleep and exercise. So I disagree with this statement. From my understanding, genes are loading the peace keeper and your health is pulling the trigger.

D69d10c3b22d75b09a12f0ebfc7c61b9

(230)

on May 03, 2012
at 02:35 AM

sun exposure does not increase your risk of melanoma. sunscreen use increases your risk of melanoma http://chriskresser.com/throw-away-the-sunscreen

4303a65967884e68bfae59817c227351

(1881)

on April 19, 2012
at 09:28 PM

It's a wonderful suggestion, I just wish it was actually useful for me. I can wear protective shirts as long as it's a polo golf shirt style. But short of a career change, I need something applied to the remaining exposed skin, I'm already looking quite red from the last couple weeks of work.

3058079ae822f066c06e55071d74b634

(164)

on April 12, 2012
at 12:04 AM

Right on. I wish I could give you a zillion up votes, barefeet. I'm cutting melanomas out of younger and younger people, and it's preventable.

3058079ae822f066c06e55071d74b634

(164)

on April 12, 2012
at 12:02 AM

There's no such thing as a healthy tan. The tanning response is an injury response by the skin. Coconut oil preventing sunburn? Not true. I'm not trying to be harsh, but you're giving information that is inaccurate and potentially harmful.

Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

(496)

on April 10, 2012
at 08:56 PM

You can build a healthy tan gradually.The hours 11/3 are the best time to get adequate vit D.Start with 5/10 min and go from there.Also asthaxantin helps to naturally prevent sunburn.Also coconut oil topically and internally.

4303a65967884e68bfae59817c227351

(1881)

on April 09, 2012
at 07:08 PM

They will just suggest wearing sunscreen like everyone else. And I need to look professional. It sucks, I'm just not in a good profession for this. Sunscreen it is.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on April 09, 2012
at 11:59 AM

Honestly, I think your best bet is to talk to your supervisors about this. Bring all the research on sun exposure, bring information about light, wicking sun-protective fabrics (such as those pants from REI that come in SPF 50), and present it as a health issue. I'd wonder about the management at a place that says your only option is to fry. At minimum, document every communication you have with your supervisors about this. Who knows how handy it may come in later when you or other greenskeepers are diagnosed with melanoma.

  • Cb905ddee5209db98e6c1252ec0a7dbf

    asked by

    (85)
  • Views
    11.9K
  • Last Activity
    1105D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

3
3058079ae822f066c06e55071d74b634

(164)

on April 09, 2012
at 11:42 AM

If you freckle and burn, chances are you have pheomelanin as your predominant form of melanin, which poorly tans (seen in redheads and lighter skinned folks, turns you more reddish and pink in response to sun). Eumelanin is the variant that imparts a more overall brown hue. You inherited this from your parents, and you can't change your genetics, my friend.

Having said that, a tan indicates that you are causing damage to your skin. The tan is your skin's way of attempting to protect you from further UVB damage to the DNA; darker skin provides more photoprotection (think of a "cap" of melanin protecting your DNA from the pyrimidine dimers that are formed when exposed to that spectrum).

For a "natural" sunscreen, wear tightly woven clothing and stay out of the sun during the peak hours (11-3ish). Physical blockers like titanium and zinc reflect both UVA and UVB wavelengths off your skin; they are essentially crushed rocks in a liquid carrier so that it can be easily applied.

Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

(496)

on April 10, 2012
at 08:56 PM

You can build a healthy tan gradually.The hours 11/3 are the best time to get adequate vit D.Start with 5/10 min and go from there.Also asthaxantin helps to naturally prevent sunburn.Also coconut oil topically and internally.

3058079ae822f066c06e55071d74b634

(164)

on April 12, 2012
at 12:02 AM

There's no such thing as a healthy tan. The tanning response is an injury response by the skin. Coconut oil preventing sunburn? Not true. I'm not trying to be harsh, but you're giving information that is inaccurate and potentially harmful.

312537f2ecb216c830c3fd351efcfbbc

(110)

on July 24, 2013
at 05:49 PM

"you can't change your genetics" I think that you can change the amount of genes expressed with factors like diet, sleep and exercise. So I disagree with this statement. From my understanding, genes are loading the peace keeper and your health is pulling the trigger.

1
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on April 09, 2012
at 12:57 PM

Just spent two months in California and didn't use any sunscreen. Granted, stayed out of sun (usually) between 10am to 2pm when rays are strongest. I did increase my Vitamin D3 to 10,000 IU daily and I think that made a big difference. You didn't say what kind of complexion you have--fair skin, light hair, and light eyes types tend to freckle.

1
4303a65967884e68bfae59817c227351

(1881)

on April 09, 2012
at 10:16 AM

Is there in fact anything we can do beyond "get out more?"

I'm a greenskeeper at a golf course. I work 50-60+ hours a week in the sun all summer. I have a dress code, I'm limited to a golf shirt and shorts. I basically have my knees to ankles, forearms and face/neck exposed virtually all day every day.

I am on the verge of red every year even if I was rocking spf 30+ all day everyday. I also tried using it just in the afternoons. In the last 10 years of doing this, I've tried just about every combination I could fathom.

So. . . is there anything I can actually do to not be burnt? I'm out in the sun all the time, my body definitely has way more than ample time to adapt to sun exposure, and yet I do still get red sometimes. Basically - I NEED some sort of sunscreen and I'm assuming that normal sunblock is pretty bad for us. All sorts of crazy chemicals and whatever else is in them. If this has been answered already, I'll definitely poke around here more, I just figured the question came up, and I also am looking for an answer on this one. . .

04f52a651c3943b008bf5c4cfd30ad20

on February 11, 2015
at 10:17 PM

Use organic coconut oil it's a natural sunscreen u will not burn, google it!! Iv used it in sun and haven't burned

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on April 09, 2012
at 11:59 AM

Honestly, I think your best bet is to talk to your supervisors about this. Bring all the research on sun exposure, bring information about light, wicking sun-protective fabrics (such as those pants from REI that come in SPF 50), and present it as a health issue. I'd wonder about the management at a place that says your only option is to fry. At minimum, document every communication you have with your supervisors about this. Who knows how handy it may come in later when you or other greenskeepers are diagnosed with melanoma.

4303a65967884e68bfae59817c227351

(1881)

on April 09, 2012
at 07:08 PM

They will just suggest wearing sunscreen like everyone else. And I need to look professional. It sucks, I'm just not in a good profession for this. Sunscreen it is.

3058079ae822f066c06e55071d74b634

(164)

on April 12, 2012
at 12:04 AM

Right on. I wish I could give you a zillion up votes, barefeet. I'm cutting melanomas out of younger and younger people, and it's preventable.

4303a65967884e68bfae59817c227351

(1881)

on April 19, 2012
at 09:28 PM

It's a wonderful suggestion, I just wish it was actually useful for me. I can wear protective shirts as long as it's a polo golf shirt style. But short of a career change, I need something applied to the remaining exposed skin, I'm already looking quite red from the last couple weeks of work.

D69d10c3b22d75b09a12f0ebfc7c61b9

(230)

on May 03, 2012
at 02:35 AM

sun exposure does not increase your risk of melanoma. sunscreen use increases your risk of melanoma http://chriskresser.com/throw-away-the-sunscreen

1
B9a579a02921868db5098bfa99f8221c

on April 09, 2012
at 08:07 AM

The part along your nose and your cheeks under your eyes is because they have a much more direct angle toward the sun, the same way that the top of your shoulders burn while your back and chest do not.

The best time for sun is the early part of the day. light is not as intense, at a lower angle, and the hormones that make vitamin d and repair UV damage are at their highest. Limit your sun to the morning, and get as much skin exposed as possible. Start very slowly. get out of the sun before you burn, and slowly increase it each day. Get out and cover up before you burn. also eat beta-carotene foods (sweet potatos). this helps increase melanin

Also, dont burn.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!