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Please help me hack 23andme results (CBS, BHMT, MAO-A)

Answered on December 20, 2014
Created June 22, 2014 at 7:22 AM

Hi,

I just got my 23andme results back and need some help understanding what the heck I can do...

1. I have a CBS mutation, which is confusing. On one hand, I have always had joint pain & stiffness, so I'm not surprised that I have a sulfur problem since sulfur is supposed to help joints function better. However, I eat eggs and other high sulfur foods and don't notice any reaction (unless it's subtle and delayed, which is entirely possible). I had a glutathione/nac/pc IV shortly before I got these results and had a very strong, negative reaction. when I take NAC and ALA orally, no problem.

If you cut out high thiol foods, you're removing most greens, which doesn't seem like a solution. I tried being vegan and felt SO much better when I broke down and ate some chicken.. You're body NEEDS sulfur, so how do you get your body to use it better vs just removing it?

2. In addition to joint pain, I have bad brain fog and fatigue - which really interferes with my ability to exercise as much as I want to and as much as I should. I can barely do my job.

Help! and thanks!

Fea6afb2ce36ad8df5548e6a5195af4d

(-12)

on June 23, 2014
at 02:14 PM

The point is that genes are highly regulated. They turn on and off as needed. Someone with dozens of "bad" genes may have no negative health consequences if the genes are not needed. That is what happens with people who are predisposed to metabolic syndrome, but eat a low-carb diet.

Someone who is not experiencing any problems as a result of the "bad" genes, but starts messing around may cause those genes to become necessary. The result is a change in health status. That's what happens when people predisposed to metabolic syndrome start eating a low-fat, high-carb diet.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on June 23, 2014
at 09:30 AM

Yeah, well, you can't supplement glutathione directly, it gets broken down by digestion. At best you can get a liposomal form to get past digestion without breaking down. This is one of those substances that also declines with age, so replacing it might have some value.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on June 23, 2014
at 09:24 AM

We appreciate your enthusiasm to answer, but it might be more helpful to actually know what those genes are and what they do. :)

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4 Answers

0
7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

on December 20, 2014
at 03:14 PM

I happen to be researching my CBS as to how it might pertain to brain fog and joint pain.  Both seem worse when I eat more protein vs. less protein.  

If the range for protein in 10%-35%, you might want to try eating at the 10% level for a month and see how you do.  That's what I'm starting today!

Also, you might want to investigate how sulfites pertains to folks with CBS in relation to how sulfur is processed.  I'm not "allergic" to sulfites but I'm wondering if the combined load of high sulfur foods, too much protein + sulfites is a problem for me.  Wine and bottled lemon juice containe lots of sulfites.  Also, folks with CBS are often advised to limit epsom salt baths.  

I remain completely confused with the high "thiol" sulfur list: http://www.livingnetwork.co.za/chelationnetwork/food/high-sulfur-sulphur-food-list/

I can't decide how/if this makes sense to me at all.

 

Good luck to us both!

Caveman_Mike

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on June 23, 2014
at 09:47 AM

You might want to run these through promethease instead, they (usually) tend to provide better descriptions.

You could also just go to snpedia.com, this is where promethease gets its descriptions from. Just search for the red SNPs:

For that last one, you might see: http://www.mthfrheds.com/

But you don't have the full MTHFR set of defects, so it probably doesn't apply (to that extent).

You might want to check some of the presentations here: http://www.dramyyasko.com/resources/presentations/

for the BHMT ones as well.

While it doesn't always provide much detail, snpedia usually provides links to a few papers that describe this SNP.

The whole homocysteine thing is usually treatable by making sure you have B6, B12, and folate available in your diet. This can be easily achieved by consuming egg yolks (without the whites) or liver.

0
Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on June 23, 2014
at 07:04 AM

The MAO-A mutation isn't too bad, everyone in my family is ++ for it and it doesn't seem to be a big deal. Next down the list, I'm seeing BHMT, that's a little bit of a drag, but with your MTHFR genetics, you're in the green. The CBS mutation is fairly common, as 1/5 people are ++.

http://web.mit.edu/london/www/cbs.html

"While some of the aspects of Dr. Yasko’s treatment plan may have usefulness, there is no support that CBS upregulation can have any negative effects."

I would just go by feel on it and trust your body. If you can eat sulfurous vegetables and feel good / neutral, then eat them up if you enjoy them. (relevant.) Glutathione injections have always seemed a little sketchy to me.

Perhaps look into trace minerals like molybdenum.

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/recommended-supplemen...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfite_oxidase

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on June 23, 2014
at 09:30 AM

Yeah, well, you can't supplement glutathione directly, it gets broken down by digestion. At best you can get a liposomal form to get past digestion without breaking down. This is one of those substances that also declines with age, so replacing it might have some value.

0
Fea6afb2ce36ad8df5548e6a5195af4d

on June 22, 2014
at 06:46 PM

Generally, gene expression is highly regulated by many factors, such as other genes, hormones, environment, and lots of stuff we don't even know about. They don't always do what we think they should do, and messing around with stuff you don't understand can be dangerous.

If you happen to have a serious condition, doing something that is usually safe, like altering your diet, could have irreversible consequences (not just your joints, but perhaps also your heart, brain, lungs, kidneys, etc).

For example:

  • In a different condition, phenylketonuria, eating the wrong stuff leads to severe mental retardation.
  • The low-fat, high-carb dietary advice during the last 50 years may be a major contributor to the obesity and diabetes "epidemic".

You should see someone, like a doctor or geneticist, who is familiar with interpreting the results of your tests and can guide you toward appropriate management.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on June 23, 2014
at 09:24 AM

We appreciate your enthusiasm to answer, but it might be more helpful to actually know what those genes are and what they do. :)

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