1

votes

Question on milk sugars

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 02, 2013 at 7:46 PM

If my goals are to replenish muscle glycogen, then I know glucose is my best bet from starches and I know that fructose will only replenish liver glycogen and the liver can also be filled from glucose. My question regards milk sugar, which from what I gather is known as lactose, which is broken down into glucose and galactose, as mentioned earlier the glucose is ideal but I was wondering where galactose is primarily stored in the muscles or the liver, and is lactose a 1:1 ratio of the 2 sugars?

Thanks for your time :P

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 03, 2013
at 02:18 AM

For those who won't catch the reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy_DASt7hDs&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 03, 2013
at 02:11 AM

Is that you Heisenberg?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 03, 2013
at 02:09 AM

Thanks, I was thinking fructose fueled muscle cells but wasn't 100% tilli read this.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 02, 2013
at 08:21 PM

Dextrose is just another name for glucose, aka hydrolyzed starch.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 02, 2013
at 07:55 PM

Dextrose > Starch for replenishing glycogen. Galactose is also present in glycogen, and it's used as a structural material in some cells, not necessarily as a form of energy. Galactose is also involved in liver detoxification, so it seems to have a completely different role than glucose in the body. Glycogen is present in both the liver and muscle so galactose will too be present in both the liver and muscle.

  • 606f2967e2ada25eb0bc2ed677ec2845

    asked by

    (364)
  • Views
    3.5K
  • Last Activity
    1283D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

1
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on May 02, 2013
at 08:39 PM

Both fructose and galactose can refil muscle by being converted into glucose quite easily. Galactose by the Lelior pathway and fructose via the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway.

Here's an applicable blog post on the Perfect Health Diet Website: http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2012/01/is-it-good-to-eat-sugar/

It includes an interesting study where maltodextrin (glucose polymers) combined with either galactose or fructose more effectively refilled glycogen of athletes than when combined with glucose.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 03, 2013
at 02:09 AM

Thanks, I was thinking fructose fueled muscle cells but wasn't 100% tilli read this.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 02, 2013
at 08:27 PM

Lactose is a disaccharide, two sugars chemically linked, specifically glucose with galactose. Assuming you have lactase (which breaks the two sugars apart), you end up with glucose and galactose. Glucose does its thing, and galactose is ultimately converted by our bodies into glucose.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 03, 2013
at 02:18 AM

For those who won't catch the reference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy_DASt7hDs&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 03, 2013
at 02:11 AM

Is that you Heisenberg?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!