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Milk Kefir sugar and carbs

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 20, 2013 at 9:17 PM

I just drank my first batch of Kefir and I was wondering if I should worry about the sugar content and carbs in the milk? 12g sugar and 12g carbs?

Af679502f1e31c0c59c79bd08f324b35

(559)

on April 24, 2013
at 07:11 PM

thank you for enlightening me :D

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on April 21, 2013
at 09:43 PM

In my post above ^^^ I am assuming you made the kefir yourself, not store bought...

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on April 21, 2013
at 09:41 PM

Lactose=sugar=carbs. Hence carbs are AFFECTED in the way they fermented as the bacteria eats the lactose therefore resulting in the carb content being in trace amounts or even 0 grams. Since the lactose=carbs are virtually non existent, this means the overall calories of the kefir is reduced compared to the starting composition of milk you had at beginning by around 100-150kcal. Overall at the end of the fermentation, you only have protein and fat let over and no carbs resulting in a sour and bubbly probiotic drink :)

Af679502f1e31c0c59c79bd08f324b35

(559)

on April 20, 2013
at 09:31 PM

i fermented it for 36hrs and it was quite sour. Carbs are not effected during fermentation correct?

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2 Answers

2
3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on April 20, 2013
at 09:25 PM

If it's homemade and fermented for 24 hours, there's nothing to fear in terms of sugars, most of it is eaten away, it should be really sour. If it's commercial in the US, it contains quite some lactose. If it's commercial in Greece for example, it hasn't much sugars in it left, so it all depends on the kefir you got, and how much you fermented it.

Af679502f1e31c0c59c79bd08f324b35

(559)

on April 20, 2013
at 09:31 PM

i fermented it for 36hrs and it was quite sour. Carbs are not effected during fermentation correct?

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on April 21, 2013
at 09:43 PM

In my post above ^^^ I am assuming you made the kefir yourself, not store bought...

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(501)

on April 21, 2013
at 09:41 PM

Lactose=sugar=carbs. Hence carbs are AFFECTED in the way they fermented as the bacteria eats the lactose therefore resulting in the carb content being in trace amounts or even 0 grams. Since the lactose=carbs are virtually non existent, this means the overall calories of the kefir is reduced compared to the starting composition of milk you had at beginning by around 100-150kcal. Overall at the end of the fermentation, you only have protein and fat let over and no carbs resulting in a sour and bubbly probiotic drink :)

Af679502f1e31c0c59c79bd08f324b35

(559)

on April 24, 2013
at 07:11 PM

thank you for enlightening me :D

0
800e726cb5dff569fd8edf604c3e2793

on April 21, 2013
at 01:32 AM

When you ferment milk, the bacteria (and yeasts in kefir's case) eat the milk sugar. You will certainly have much less sugar and carbs in kefir than in milk, how much less depends. Generally speaking, the longer you've been fermenting (and the more sour the end product is), the less sugar and carbs you have left.

The USDA nutrition database says about 1/3 of the carbs in milk are still left in yogurt, but the usual US yogurt is underfermented. Since you make your own kefir you can ferment it longer to have less residual sugar.

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