4

votes

How addictive is sugar?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 09, 2010 at 4:10 AM

I remember when I was a kid and I heard the ice cream truck coming, I would drop everything and RUN to the house for money and the run down the street for the truck as fast as I could go. I never ran that hard for anything else in my life during those years. Sugar tasted like heaven and it was the only thing that would motivate me that much. Later, when I went lowcarb for the first time, breaking that sugar addiction for the first time took incredible will power over the course of several days. Even now, I think of myself in some ways as a recovering sugar addict. Looking back, the pattern of addiction seems clear, even down to withdrawal symptoms, but for most of my life, I had no idea. Is sugar that addicting to everyone? Has there been much research on this? I am wondering if this is universal or tends to be more genetic in nature. I have met some people who say they don't like sweet things that much, but even they do seem to eat a lot of starch and get fat, so pure sugar along can't be a problem for everyone. Or can it? Thoughts? Anyone here never really addicted to sugar?

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Hehe, yeah, the first (and thankfully last) time I stole something from a store was when I was about 5 and stole some candy coated chickletts. Ironic you should mention theft as I was just thinking of that sugar theft incident when considering asking this question in the first place. I was 5 years old and what did I steal? Not a toy but some friggen sugar coated gum of all things!

807ea18498bcc5474b249a184f4d1ad6

on February 18, 2011
at 07:20 PM

The first time I ended up stealing anything was a dollar from my father's money clip to buy something from the ice cream truck. :(

807ea18498bcc5474b249a184f4d1ad6

on February 18, 2011
at 07:15 PM

OA helped me a great deal. I didn't realize how much until I moved far way from the support of face to face meetings. I'm thinking of trying to start a meeting where I live now.

C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on January 22, 2011
at 12:10 AM

76 days now. I can't believe it. I've not eaten sugar, wheat, rice potatoes or corn in that time. I went from 93 to 86 kilos in the first two weeks, but haven't lost any since. I don't care I think I've probably lost a lot of fat but added heaps of bone density and muscle.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on December 02, 2010
at 06:03 AM

Actually, I think paleo might be even harder for sugar addicts. I see them all around me. They feel ill if they don't eat regularly and when that happens, they must have sugar ASAP. THey even feel faint! SOme of them are in their early 20s and appear on the surface to be healthy but are already on the blood sugar roller coaster. But talk to them about giving up carbs for even a short while and the answer is NO WAY! I am only one of two people at work who doesn't HAVE to have my lunch on time to avoid feeling sick. All others are shackled to regular sugar titration.

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on November 23, 2010
at 07:35 AM

agree..........

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 20, 2010
at 04:17 AM

Exactly. Why would so many people eat lots of something they know is not healthful? Unless the reward stimulation were ... I'd say addictive! Sure, might not be addictive to everyone, but it sure is addictive to many more than other stuff like gambling. However, I don't think sugar would have as strong a foothold if the dangers were better understood and people were warned off early in life.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 20, 2010
at 04:14 AM

Is alcohol addictive? I think sugar is at least as addictive. I know more people addicted to sugar than to alcohol. My coworker was recently diagnosed with diabetes and is trying to give up sugar. But she is having a very hard time with it!

C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on November 16, 2010
at 12:37 AM

I'm into day 9 now. woohoo!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2010
at 03:44 AM

I wonder if that's literally true. Would eating spicy food have such effects?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 11, 2010
at 12:33 AM

Do all very pleasurable, rewarding experiences not have similar effects on the brain?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 11, 2010
at 12:25 AM

Some people get addicted to sugar or alcohol or sex or computor games or gambling or extreme sports etc. I guess I don't think these things are inherently addictive, just experiences that stimulate reward pathways in the brain. Some people are vunerable to addiction to such types of experience. I guess you can say "sugar can be addictive" but not that "sugar is addictive"?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 11, 2010
at 12:13 AM

Some people get addicted to alcohol or sex or computor games or gambling or extreme sports etc. I guess I don't think these things are inherently addictive, just pleasurable experiences stimulating reward centers in the brain. Some people are vunerable to addiction to any similar type of experience.

E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on November 10, 2010
at 10:41 PM

Some people just don't seem to be AS affected by sugar, but for those of us who ARE - we don' need no stinkin' flavorings! I, too, would sometimes eat sugar straight out of the bowl or take a spoonful of brown sugar and and savor it slowly. And DON'T get me started on maple sugar - oh jeez...

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:31 PM

oops made my commment down below before reading yours

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:28 PM

that funnel cake wafting through the air is torturous ;), but the implications of the way you will feel afterwards is not worth it, so smell but don't taste :D

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 09, 2010
at 11:41 PM

I don't doubt it or that sugar itself can be addictive for individuals as can many things. However I suspect people who end up here are a selective group. All just my speculations though.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 09, 2010
at 11:21 PM

Yeah, I am the same way. If I eat some sugar, then the cravings actually get worse, not better. I want more and more! That's the main reason I don't take the first bite, cuz i know I will have to deal with the cravings all day after that.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 09, 2010
at 11:14 PM

I actually did like spoonfuls of table sugar ever since I was a kid. Stuff with a little additional flavoring was a tad better, but straight sugar was still good. Or sugar with starch. Or sugar with fat. Or sugar with almost anything! I think the only reason I stopped or controlled that desire was because first, it was kinda piggish, and second, I knew it was unhealthy. But if I thought sugar was healthy or even neutral, sure I would happily consume spoonfuls of sugar.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 09, 2010
at 11:09 PM

My problem is I am addicted to air (oxygen)! Hehe. OK, sounds dumb but the problem is many nutritionists are saying that 'glucose' is a health requirement and the body needs a certain (high) level of intake for 'energy' and to maintain health. As long as this kind of misinfo continues and people are told sugar is like air, then most people will not take seriously the concept of sugar addiction.

3573f7a18ee620179fda184c7d8b7242

(241)

on November 09, 2010
at 07:15 PM

Yeah, I agree. The justifications ("just this little bit") are just like a drug addiction.

3573f7a18ee620179fda184c7d8b7242

(241)

on November 09, 2010
at 07:13 PM

Wow, this is exactly what I've been thinking about a lot lately. Same contributing factors: poor sleep, going too long without eating and, of course, recent sugar intake. Sugar seriously causes my arthritis to flare. Unfortunately the impact lags by a day or two, so the negative consequences are slightly delayed. Which always enables me to rationalize the next time around.

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on November 09, 2010
at 05:48 PM

Anyone who works or has experience with people in recovery will tell you this is super common. I know alcoholics in recovery who carry candy in their pockets and load coffee with sugar (8 packets in one case), heroin addicts who say that ice cream is the only thing that gets them through withdrawal, stimulant addicts who compensate with energy drinks and sugar straight out of the bag. I don't think it is bad in the short term, but this long term, compounded with already upset hormonal balance, emotional ties to substances, and past malnutrition is a metabolic disaster waiting to happen.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 09, 2010
at 02:11 PM

This is timely for me. I am trying to take the same approach, but the rest of my family can be much less strict. The fair is coming up and funnel cake is very tempting, but really not worth it I guess

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on November 09, 2010
at 07:43 AM

Yes this was the case for me - not only sugar but carbs ( I suppose the same thing anyway)

D5009552df44e662ad0032d0c1d14b8c

on November 09, 2010
at 07:23 AM

I am in agreement with this. I spoke with Dr. Ray Strand who warns that if you (we) spike our sugar, even after having been off sugar for a while, it'll take 4 days for our bodies to read just to lose the craving again. I also want to add that I know that when I intake simple carbs, my arthritis is worse!This is coming from someone who's granma taught us how to make sugar and butter sandwhiches. That my friends is like dying and going to heaven. Talk about needing will power then; all I can say is don't let your body go too long without healthy food. Keep you blood sugar even as possible.

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16 Answers

best answer

4
Fe198e0c02edd407cdf8c83c0fceaea1

(753)

on November 09, 2010
at 03:54 PM

Sugar is one of the accepted drugs of modern society. Most people I talk to about my eating habits say something along the lines of "Well, that sounds good, but I could NEVER give up bread!" Someone once said that if you find something which you CANNOT give up, you probably should. I stay off sugar for the most part, but when I do have a taste it's really hard to stop and I usually go overboard, end up feeling like crap physically and mentally. Now I just go for berries in coconut milk, as the sugar in fruit at least comes packaged with fiber, and I don't seem to induce more cravings from that. To all those trying to free themselves from the tyranny of this substance, Godspeed! You most certainly can do it.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 09, 2010
at 11:09 PM

My problem is I am addicted to air (oxygen)! Hehe. OK, sounds dumb but the problem is many nutritionists are saying that 'glucose' is a health requirement and the body needs a certain (high) level of intake for 'energy' and to maintain health. As long as this kind of misinfo continues and people are told sugar is like air, then most people will not take seriously the concept of sugar addiction.

best answer

1
2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

on November 10, 2010
at 07:32 PM

And you know the silliest part? Everyone knows sugar is devoid of nutrition, causing tooth decay, etc. Yet most people still let it in. Mind boggling...

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 20, 2010
at 04:17 AM

Exactly. Why would so many people eat lots of something they know is not healthful? Unless the reward stimulation were ... I'd say addictive! Sure, might not be addictive to everyone, but it sure is addictive to many more than other stuff like gambling. However, I don't think sugar would have as strong a foothold if the dangers were better understood and people were warned off early in life.

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on November 23, 2010
at 07:35 AM

agree..........

7
5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on November 09, 2010
at 05:52 AM

Hello, my name is Scott and I'm a sugarholic. It's been... four hours since my last sugar fix. *hangs head*

Yeah, I can now be away from sugar for longer and longer periods of time. Sometimes, though, something triggers a craving and I cave. Some of the factors that I've been able to identify about my own binges are lack of sleep or poor sleep, lack of exercise, recent sugar intake (the longer I go without, the easier resisting is), stress (especially about something that I feel powerless about).

D5009552df44e662ad0032d0c1d14b8c

on November 09, 2010
at 07:23 AM

I am in agreement with this. I spoke with Dr. Ray Strand who warns that if you (we) spike our sugar, even after having been off sugar for a while, it'll take 4 days for our bodies to read just to lose the craving again. I also want to add that I know that when I intake simple carbs, my arthritis is worse!This is coming from someone who's granma taught us how to make sugar and butter sandwhiches. That my friends is like dying and going to heaven. Talk about needing will power then; all I can say is don't let your body go too long without healthy food. Keep you blood sugar even as possible.

3573f7a18ee620179fda184c7d8b7242

(241)

on November 09, 2010
at 07:13 PM

Wow, this is exactly what I've been thinking about a lot lately. Same contributing factors: poor sleep, going too long without eating and, of course, recent sugar intake. Sugar seriously causes my arthritis to flare. Unfortunately the impact lags by a day or two, so the negative consequences are slightly delayed. Which always enables me to rationalize the next time around.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 09, 2010
at 11:21 PM

Yeah, I am the same way. If I eat some sugar, then the cravings actually get worse, not better. I want more and more! That's the main reason I don't take the first bite, cuz i know I will have to deal with the cravings all day after that.

5
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 09, 2010
at 04:55 AM

I get easily addicted. Sugar is my favorite thing in the world. Research supports this, although it doesn't stop me from feeling like a wimpy little baby when it comes to self-control. During a tenure at a pain clinic, my favorite cocktail was strong opioid painkillers plus a pint of Ben and Jerry's.

"Sugar is noteworthy as a substance that releases opioids and dopamine and thus might be expected to have addictive potential...Neural adaptations include changes in dopamine and opioid receptor binding, enkephalin mRNA expression and dopamine and acetylcholine release in the nucleus accumbens. The evidence supports the hypothesis that under certain circumstances rats can become sugar dependent. This may translate to some human conditions as suggested by the literature on eating disorders and obesity."

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 11, 2010
at 12:33 AM

Do all very pleasurable, rewarding experiences not have similar effects on the brain?

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2010
at 03:44 AM

I wonder if that's literally true. Would eating spicy food have such effects?

4
8ce2e69af79dcb1488f776efc1c54052

on November 09, 2010
at 03:42 PM

At a recent Robb Wolf workshop he told us of a client ( I believe this is in his book as well), who was formally addicted to crack, got off of it and subsequently became addicted to sugar putting on something like 100 lbs from crapacinos, donuts, etc. She stated that it was harder to get off of sugar then it was crack!

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:31 PM

oops made my commment down below before reading yours

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on November 09, 2010
at 05:48 PM

Anyone who works or has experience with people in recovery will tell you this is super common. I know alcoholics in recovery who carry candy in their pockets and load coffee with sugar (8 packets in one case), heroin addicts who say that ice cream is the only thing that gets them through withdrawal, stimulant addicts who compensate with energy drinks and sugar straight out of the bag. I don't think it is bad in the short term, but this long term, compounded with already upset hormonal balance, emotional ties to substances, and past malnutrition is a metabolic disaster waiting to happen.

3
145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

on November 09, 2010
at 08:13 PM

For me it's not sugar, but sweet taste. I gave up sugar some 10-12 years ago, but the sweet taste (as in sucralose, stevia and erythritol) is a battle I fight (and lose) daily. And even though I know that the sweet taste brings along problems with insulin, I can honestly, when no one's looking, say in truth that I don't really want to give up things that taste sweet. I'm pretty sure that if I really wanted to, I could do it - ergo, I must not really want to. I do know that if I manage to make it one day without anything that tastes sweet, I am plotting for the next day how I can have "just a little" of something sweet, since I did so well the first day. By 10:00 am of the next day when I've had "just a little," I have fallen down the rabbit hole again.

From someone who walked away from cigarettes some 20 years ago with nary a look back or a craving, I'll have to say: this addiction to sweet tase is something that really has me flummoxed.

3
C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

on November 09, 2010
at 02:12 PM

The first time I stole something (I was like six) it was sugary striped gum. I used to take coins from my Mom's purse to buy Hostess fruit pies, Twinkies, Ho hos, and all kinds of candy, including that crap candy necklace that's on a stretchy string that you wear around your neck. I never remember taking change from my Mom's purse for meat. Or vegetables.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Hehe, yeah, the first (and thankfully last) time I stole something from a store was when I was about 5 and stole some candy coated chickletts. Ironic you should mention theft as I was just thinking of that sugar theft incident when considering asking this question in the first place. I was 5 years old and what did I steal? Not a toy but some friggen sugar coated gum of all things!

807ea18498bcc5474b249a184f4d1ad6

on February 18, 2011
at 07:20 PM

The first time I ended up stealing anything was a dollar from my father's money clip to buy something from the ice cream truck. :(

3
52a0f9552d0d9f732167f0bd1ff6ed07

(168)

on November 09, 2010
at 01:57 PM

The only way I can prevent myself from eating sugar is to literally think of it as a dangerous drug, and label my behaviors as those of an addict. One day at a time! Look into compulsive- or over-eaters anonymous, they have solid advice and a nice support group. Maybe look up addiction psychology too. It was a real eye opener. Good luck!

807ea18498bcc5474b249a184f4d1ad6

on February 18, 2011
at 07:15 PM

OA helped me a great deal. I didn't realize how much until I moved far way from the support of face to face meetings. I'm thinking of trying to start a meeting where I live now.

3
0dbd6cbb96871e07d062fea7e37b0a18

on November 09, 2010
at 01:45 PM

I was raised on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches with milk. Later in life switched to sugar laden cereals. I was one hyper spun out kid. As an adult my addiction continued with sugary coffee and protein powders. There was always a strong feeling of need for that fix. My strength waned and my recovery from exercise was nearly non existant. I used to be so fixated on sugar and not even know it. It was the ultimate comfort food. Now i find myself getting just about as excited about eating meat and fat. I hope this continues!

3
B3e106358735a76a9d3ab4243af4fd4c

on November 09, 2010
at 01:33 PM

Been off sugar since March 2002. I have never cheated, not once. The trick for me was giving it up for good with no exceptions. No birthday cake or holiday treats. After the first month it became pretty easy. Tempted occasionally. After a few months the desire was gone. Never tempted.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 09, 2010
at 02:11 PM

This is timely for me. I am trying to take the same approach, but the rest of my family can be much less strict. The fair is coming up and funnel cake is very tempting, but really not worth it I guess

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:28 PM

that funnel cake wafting through the air is torturous ;), but the implications of the way you will feel afterwards is not worth it, so smell but don't taste :D

3
D5db204527668aa712504995c0f8f96f

(551)

on November 09, 2010
at 05:02 AM

You might find this interesting (sugar is more addictive than cocaine in mouse models) :

link text

3
04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

on November 09, 2010
at 04:54 AM

I believe sugar is very addicting. I no longer have cravings for anything sweet. But, if I decide to indulge.., the addiction comes back very quickly thus harder to resist.

2
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 09, 2010
at 06:54 PM

From a personal perspective I have never found sugar to be addictive, or any food really. Even as a child the chocolate I was given for christmas would last me for months.

However I am unconvinced that sugar is itself addictive. If sugar was addictive then surely its purest form would be the more attractive and yet I do not see people eating spoonfuls of white sugar or glucose surup from the baking section of supermarkets (I expect someone does). I don't see people craving boiled potatoes to get a starch fix either and few people would drink vegetable oil either. However combine these into a doughnut and the situation changes.

Looking at the answers given previously people metion the following: Sugary coffee, donuts, cappacinos, Twinkies, birthday cake, ice cream.

All of these are combinations of sugar, fat, dairy, starch, flavourings etc. I suspect it is the specific combinations of these ingredients and flavours that overstimulate the reward centers of the brain producint addictive live qualities. This article proposes the same idea - How the Food Makers Captured Our Brains . Blaming sugar alone seems as incorrect as just blaming fat for processed foods adictive effects.

How suseptable you are the addictive effects of foods will vary in the same way as any other personallity trait. Some people even get addicted to the stimulatory effects of the internet...

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 09, 2010
at 11:41 PM

I don't doubt it or that sugar itself can be addictive for individuals as can many things. However I suspect people who end up here are a selective group. All just my speculations though.

E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on November 10, 2010
at 10:41 PM

Some people just don't seem to be AS affected by sugar, but for those of us who ARE - we don' need no stinkin' flavorings! I, too, would sometimes eat sugar straight out of the bowl or take a spoonful of brown sugar and and savor it slowly. And DON'T get me started on maple sugar - oh jeez...

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 11, 2010
at 12:13 AM

Some people get addicted to alcohol or sex or computor games or gambling or extreme sports etc. I guess I don't think these things are inherently addictive, just pleasurable experiences stimulating reward centers in the brain. Some people are vunerable to addiction to any similar type of experience.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 09, 2010
at 11:14 PM

I actually did like spoonfuls of table sugar ever since I was a kid. Stuff with a little additional flavoring was a tad better, but straight sugar was still good. Or sugar with starch. Or sugar with fat. Or sugar with almost anything! I think the only reason I stopped or controlled that desire was because first, it was kinda piggish, and second, I knew it was unhealthy. But if I thought sugar was healthy or even neutral, sure I would happily consume spoonfuls of sugar.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 11, 2010
at 12:25 AM

Some people get addicted to sugar or alcohol or sex or computor games or gambling or extreme sports etc. I guess I don't think these things are inherently addictive, just experiences that stimulate reward pathways in the brain. Some people are vunerable to addiction to such types of experience. I guess you can say "sugar can be addictive" but not that "sugar is addictive"?

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 20, 2010
at 04:14 AM

Is alcohol addictive? I think sugar is at least as addictive. I know more people addicted to sugar than to alcohol. My coworker was recently diagnosed with diabetes and is trying to give up sugar. But she is having a very hard time with it!

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on December 02, 2010
at 06:03 AM

Actually, I think paleo might be even harder for sugar addicts. I see them all around me. They feel ill if they don't eat regularly and when that happens, they must have sugar ASAP. THey even feel faint! SOme of them are in their early 20s and appear on the surface to be healthy but are already on the blood sugar roller coaster. But talk to them about giving up carbs for even a short while and the answer is NO WAY! I am only one of two people at work who doesn't HAVE to have my lunch on time to avoid feeling sick. All others are shackled to regular sugar titration.

2
C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on November 09, 2010
at 06:45 AM

I first read about sugar as sweet poison a year ago. I'm still trying to get off it. My record is nine days off it. I've also had 4 days off it. I'm into my second day right now. It's unbelievably frustrating the hold sugar has on me. I can be eating sugar before I even know what I'm doing. I know I'll lose a stack of weight if I can stop eating it and I want that very much, but my brain always says, "just this last once", and it seems it there's nothing I can do. I remember yesterday thinking, all day long, "there's no excuses today." That got me through.

I think it could be the most addictive substance known to man. Ask any random person to give up sugar and see how they react.

3573f7a18ee620179fda184c7d8b7242

(241)

on November 09, 2010
at 07:15 PM

Yeah, I agree. The justifications ("just this little bit") are just like a drug addiction.

C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on November 16, 2010
at 12:37 AM

I'm into day 9 now. woohoo!

C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on January 22, 2011
at 12:10 AM

76 days now. I can't believe it. I've not eaten sugar, wheat, rice potatoes or corn in that time. I went from 93 to 86 kilos in the first two weeks, but haven't lost any since. I don't care I think I've probably lost a lot of fat but added heaps of bone density and muscle.

1
2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

on November 10, 2010
at 07:21 PM

Robb Wolf's direct quote:

It's like crack!

1
D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 09, 2010
at 04:36 AM

For me, sugar was addicting until I pumped up the fat and protein content. Then getting rid of it was breeze. The cookie at lunch just wasn't as tempting. In that sense sugar doesn't seem to be a typical addiction. For me, its necessity was predicated on the lack of a different macronutrient. Plus, eating sugary stuff is just damn easy. I think it's more of the ease that's addicting than the substance itself. You need to know how to live with out sugar which takes some serious lifestyle reprogramming.

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on November 09, 2010
at 07:43 AM

Yes this was the case for me - not only sugar but carbs ( I suppose the same thing anyway)

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