2

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Does Sugar help Fungal Issues?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 20, 2012 at 7:23 PM

Every health store I go to seems to be populated with people that believe sugar feeds yeast. I often hear conversations about it. Now, if there's anyone familiar with yeast, I am. I've had fungal issues (tons of tinea etc.) several times in my life, was diagnosed with a mold allergy, and had numerous bacterial issues (acne, sinus infections, ...).

But the one thing that made it all worse was cutting out sugar completely. Is the theory that you need to eat sugar so that yeast doesn't become angry a valid one, or is there an other theory of why sugar helps against fungal problems?

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on April 23, 2012
at 05:19 AM

You could also try rosemary oil or neem oil, both of which have some antifungal properties. Plus, oil makes it difficult for oxygen and water to penetrate. Toes are tough to keep free from moisture, though. I've also found some success with peroxide followed by an oil-based antifungal.

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on April 23, 2012
at 05:13 AM

While it's true that many (not all) antifungals work better in the fed state, this is in part because many antifungals work by inhibition metabolic processes like cell wall formation. Metabolic activity ramps up when there is food available, thus these drugs have more metabolically active targets in the fed state. Penicillins work the same way, but they tend to work better without food because food impairs the absorption of the drug.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on April 22, 2012
at 06:06 PM

Huh. Funny you mention it but since I started this thing two years ago the toenail fungus that was in just one toe (forever, seemingly, as a bout of oral Lamisil knocked it out of the rest of them) is now back in about eight of em. Gross. I know, tinea does not need sugar. Trying topical tea tree oil for now...

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on April 20, 2012
at 08:42 PM

I can't remember where I saw this (and I don't have the time to look it up right now), but I remember reading something about candida making leaky gut/intestinal problems worse because without sugar to keep the candida happy, the candida $#%^s things up in search of sugar. But (please!) don't take my word on this because I don't remember it all. I mention it only as potential keywords for successful googling :)

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3 Answers

3
5ea8f17252dad5376000af72cf5a75be

(128)

on April 20, 2012
at 08:26 PM

Yes there is some validity in low carb diets and fungal infections. Check out what Dr. Paul Jaminet said about ketosis and candida:

As far as low-carb ketosis goes, this is a woefully under-researched area. It???s more basic biology, if you think about the biology it has to be this way. Also personal experience, nothing flares my fungal infection like ketogenic dieting.

However, there are papers dealing with diabetics (who experience high levels of ketones, even ketoacidosis) and their vulnerability to fungal infections. ???diabetes Candida??? brings up 704 papers. Here are some papers:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3084140. Neutrophils are less able to kill Candida when ketones are present.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8850487, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2495782, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3123185 Candidiasis in diabetic patients with ketoacidosis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2356851 Obese people develop candida infections when fasting causes ketosis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10981686 Virulent strains of Candida may make and release pyruvate causing neighboring human cells to turn the excess pyruvate into ketones which benefit the Candida.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8067777 Serum drawn from fasting patients is less protective against Candida than serum drawn postprandially, and antifungal drugs work better in the fed state than in a fasted state.fed state than in a fasted state.

link text

This was new info for me, but I always wondered if 'starving' the yeast actually made it more virulent.

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on April 23, 2012
at 05:13 AM

While it's true that many (not all) antifungals work better in the fed state, this is in part because many antifungals work by inhibition metabolic processes like cell wall formation. Metabolic activity ramps up when there is food available, thus these drugs have more metabolically active targets in the fed state. Penicillins work the same way, but they tend to work better without food because food impairs the absorption of the drug.

3
8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

on April 20, 2012
at 08:25 PM

Yeasts (Candida spp., among others) consume sugar. Tinea are fungi, but not yeasts. Molds are not yeasts. Bacteria also tend to feed off sugar, but are not yeasts.

Human yeast infections are invariably Candida spp. They are normal flora, and become pathological in the immunocompetent only in cases of vaginal eradication of protective bacterial flora ("yeast infection") or, rarely, pharyngitis (sore throat from yeast). The latter is far more typical of the severely immunocompromised, as are all other pathological Candida infections. In fact, persistent pathological Candida is one of the infections that defines the transition from HIV+ serology to full-blown AIDS.

So yes: sugar feeds yeast. Tinea, mold, and bacteria are not yeasts. Sugar predisposes to most non-viral infections, however, and is /typically/ an exacerbating factor in both bacterial and tinea infections. Also keep in mind that tinea is a broad term for at least three genera of fungal pathogens, with numerous species within each.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on April 22, 2012
at 06:06 PM

Huh. Funny you mention it but since I started this thing two years ago the toenail fungus that was in just one toe (forever, seemingly, as a bout of oral Lamisil knocked it out of the rest of them) is now back in about eight of em. Gross. I know, tinea does not need sugar. Trying topical tea tree oil for now...

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on April 23, 2012
at 05:19 AM

You could also try rosemary oil or neem oil, both of which have some antifungal properties. Plus, oil makes it difficult for oxygen and water to penetrate. Toes are tough to keep free from moisture, though. I've also found some success with peroxide followed by an oil-based antifungal.

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C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on April 22, 2012
at 06:06 PM

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