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Does Coconut sugar cause tooth decay?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 08, 2011 at 7:26 AM

How does Coconut sugar compare to sugarcane when it comes to tooth decay? Does it also promote it?

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on November 08, 2011
at 05:41 PM

It is sweet but is it really a subset of sugar, which I think is sucrose and fructose?

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 08, 2011
at 12:57 PM

It's still sugar, even with the low GL and such, so oral bacteria is still an issue - just brush and floss as normal, rinse with water after a sweet treat. I treat any kind of sweetener, honey/molasses/coconut nectar, etc. the same way. No cavities!

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3 Answers

4
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 08, 2011
at 11:14 AM

It's sugar. It might not be bleached like white table sugar, but it is sugar. The bacteria on our teeth don't care how sugar was made, as long as they can eat it.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on November 08, 2011
at 05:41 PM

It is sweet but is it really a subset of sugar, which I think is sucrose and fructose?

0
E286e6ba6ef6c4c4a31a749e59aa57e1

on November 08, 2011
at 12:56 PM

I wonder if the slight antibacterial properties of coconut would offset this?

0
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:47 PM

The main advantage of coconut sugar is that it has a very low glycemic index and has impressive vitamin and mineral levels. However, it's still sugar and I've never read anything indicating it would make any difference as far as dental decay is concerned.

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