2

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Does carbonated water damage teeth? What about carbs?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 18, 2012 at 10:40 PM

Maybe it's just more conventional wisdom, but I remember a friend back then swearing off all carbonated drinks because it was supposedly damaging to teeth because of its acidity or something. Is there any truth in this? Or is it really the sugar in most carbonated drinks?

Related to that last question, I used to be LC but I've tried adding starches back in without any immediately noticeable effect on weight or other things (I don't have glucose monitors or anything like that), but one thing I've wondered is what effect, if any it would have on dental health in the long-term, given that carbs supposedly give food for the bacteria on the teeth (but then, is that assuming there are no bacteria that eats fat/protein in food? or do they function differently?)?

2fd566cefde2de38e75e1bc13a966e16

(662)

on April 19, 2012
at 04:37 AM

Interesting, but that's mineral water. If OP is drinking soda water it may be worse given that it doesn't have all those minerals already in solution (which the paper is suggesting might impact the dissolution equilibria of the minerals in enamel). I'm having trouble finding good data on the acidity of carbonated water, but it looks to be around pH ~3-4 according to Wikipedia, which I would think is definitely acidic enough to erode enamel. Definitely not as bad as Coke or Pepsi which sit at pH 2.5.

2fd566cefde2de38e75e1bc13a966e16

(662)

on April 19, 2012
at 04:37 AM

Interesting, but that's mineral water. Not sure if OP is drinking soda water water it may be worse given that it doesn't have all those minerals already in solution (which the paper is suggesting might impact the dissolution equilibria of the minerals in enamel). I'm having trouble finding good data on the acidity of carbonated water, but it looks to be around pH ~3-4 according to Wikipedia, which I would think is definitely acidic enough to erode enamel. Definitely not as bad as Coke or Pepsi which sit at pH 2.5.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 19, 2012
at 12:34 AM

Good to know, thanks!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 18, 2012
at 10:54 PM

Hmm. I can't give an educated answer. I make home-made carbonated water so I know there aren't any additives. I only drink a glass every couple of days. I also eat lots of crunchy vegetables, which seem to exercise my gums and clean my teeth naturally. I also dry-brush my teeth and gums. No problems observed by me or my dentist.

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4 Answers

best answer

11
2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on April 19, 2012
at 12:27 AM

Hi Dracil, I am a dentist,

Carbonated water is slightly acidic. As long as you are drinking it and not holding it in your mouth for long periods of time it is not a problem. It is the sugar in the lower pH environment that seems to be the problem here. Lemons are much more acidic and people who suck on them habitually for long periods seem to be the only ones who lose tooth enamel this way. This is called erosion, not decay.
Any fermentable carbohydrate can cause tooth decay to progress. So yes starches can cause some decay. The amylase in your saliva can break them into sugar. Remember to brush your teeth, hope this helped.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 19, 2012
at 12:34 AM

Good to know, thanks!

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2012
at 06:45 AM

HI, Carbonated water gets it's carbonation from carbonic acid. Any acid is bad for your teeth. But like anything else, if you do it in moderation, there shouldn't be a problem. Just make sure you take good care of your teeth by brushing and flossing.


Taps and dies

0
5b5abb28f3cacf4f5a01497f2895d072

(238)

on April 19, 2012
at 04:23 AM

There's a summary of an article here suggesting that fizzy water is fine. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11556958

2fd566cefde2de38e75e1bc13a966e16

(662)

on April 19, 2012
at 04:37 AM

Interesting, but that's mineral water. Not sure if OP is drinking soda water water it may be worse given that it doesn't have all those minerals already in solution (which the paper is suggesting might impact the dissolution equilibria of the minerals in enamel). I'm having trouble finding good data on the acidity of carbonated water, but it looks to be around pH ~3-4 according to Wikipedia, which I would think is definitely acidic enough to erode enamel. Definitely not as bad as Coke or Pepsi which sit at pH 2.5.

2fd566cefde2de38e75e1bc13a966e16

(662)

on April 19, 2012
at 04:37 AM

Interesting, but that's mineral water. If OP is drinking soda water it may be worse given that it doesn't have all those minerals already in solution (which the paper is suggesting might impact the dissolution equilibria of the minerals in enamel). I'm having trouble finding good data on the acidity of carbonated water, but it looks to be around pH ~3-4 according to Wikipedia, which I would think is definitely acidic enough to erode enamel. Definitely not as bad as Coke or Pepsi which sit at pH 2.5.

0
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on April 19, 2012
at 12:33 AM

If I remember my chemistry correctly, "carbonic acid" is a name that was sometimes given to a carbon dioxide solution in water, and that's exactly what carbonated water is.

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