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Does a glucose spike increase blood coagulation?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 14, 2012 at 1:39 AM

Hi, I'm sort of slipping into doing paleo due to health problems but do have the odd treat, especially popcorn. My question is: does the blood get sticky when we have a sugar spike after a high GI load food?

The reason for asking is that I have venous reflux in my leg due to an old DVT and when I eat a big tub of popcorn the vein is more painful than usual for a couple of hours afterwards. I have now experimented for a few days with strict adherence to no sugar of any sort. I'm also having complex carbs and low GI foods and the vein symptoms are better than they have been for months. Practically no pain. If I knew there was a link it would keep me focussed on keeping strict about it.

Extra info: I'm not diabetic- I was tested recently. I realise that if the blood does get sticky it wouldn't affect ordinary people so much- it's just that with me it's fighting its way thru a damaged vein. Also, I don't need advice on DVT, it's the sugar/blood coagulation thing that I'm intrigued about. I know popcorn is mostly starch but it has quite a high GI index (60-80)and I have 100 grammes at a time.

I did do some googling on this. There was one result that mentioned excess glucose dehydrated the blood leading to greater stickiness; another said it coats the platelets like sugar glazing! That would be interesting. Both sources didn't look too reliable though.

Thanks

Db20e80aec9abf291a7f685d2b0ed42e

(55)

on December 14, 2012
at 04:01 PM

Thank you Mscott for taking the time to look up those links. I read all four abstracts and it seems I'm on the right track. I don't know why my search didn't throw up some scientific papers too. As an aside, when I went to the hospital (UK) to see the vascular specialist I mentioned that I was eating healthily for general health and was there anything specific I could do with my diet to reduce the periodic clotting and inflammation. He said, in a disdainful tone, "Your ever-so-healthy diet won't do anything."

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on December 14, 2012
at 06:23 AM

Funny, the day I got a DVT in my arm a year and a half ago (mainly streunous exercise, plus an anatomical flaw), I'd eaten potato pancakes (oil, potatoes and wheat flour) the night before. Didn't have a meter at the time and havn't eat that sort of thing when I've tested, but Who knows if blood sugar was a factor? Thanks for the post

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A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 14, 2012
at 03:51 AM

The idea that hyperglycemia increases coagulation seems pretty well supported:

  1. "Hyperglycemia Stimulates Coagulation, Whereas Hyperinsulinemia Impairs Fibrinolysis in Healthy Humans".

  2. "Activation of the tissue factor pathway of blood coagulation during prolonged hyperglycemia in young healthy men".

  3. "Loss of Endothelial Glycocalyx During Acute Hyperglycemia Coincides With Endothelial Dysfunction and Coagulation Activation In Vivo".

  4. "Hyperglycemia-Induced Thrombin Formation in Diabetes: The Possible Role of Oxidative Stress".

Does this mean a hefty glucose spike in a non-diabetic person eating high GI carbs is going to increase coagulation? It may actually. In that last paper the researchers used non diabetic subjects as a control group and measured levels of "Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1+2), which represents a reliable marker of the amount of thrombin released in the circulation". After an oral glucose tolerance test (which often means eating about 75 grams of glucose) "F1+2 significantly increased in both diabetic and healthy subjects".

Perhaps this is why your leg feels painful? I don't know much about DVT myself, so I'll just leave this information here.

Db20e80aec9abf291a7f685d2b0ed42e

(55)

on December 14, 2012
at 04:01 PM

Thank you Mscott for taking the time to look up those links. I read all four abstracts and it seems I'm on the right track. I don't know why my search didn't throw up some scientific papers too. As an aside, when I went to the hospital (UK) to see the vascular specialist I mentioned that I was eating healthily for general health and was there anything specific I could do with my diet to reduce the periodic clotting and inflammation. He said, in a disdainful tone, "Your ever-so-healthy diet won't do anything."

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on December 14, 2012
at 06:23 AM

Funny, the day I got a DVT in my arm a year and a half ago (mainly streunous exercise, plus an anatomical flaw), I'd eaten potato pancakes (oil, potatoes and wheat flour) the night before. Didn't have a meter at the time and havn't eat that sort of thing when I've tested, but Who knows if blood sugar was a factor? Thanks for the post

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