2

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Concerned with elevated fasting blood sugar on Paleo

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 10, 2013 at 5:10 PM

I've been following the Jaminet's Perfect Health Diet the last month. Breakfast consists of Bulletproof Coffee (coffee+2 tablespoons butter+ 1 tablespoon MCT Oil + 1 tablespoon coconut oil). Lunch and Dinner are paleo meals; with dinner I alternate between eating a medium sized sweet potato or regular potato. I don't have hunger pangs between meals and don't snack. Also I follow the intermittent fasting protocal where my last meal is at 9 pm and first meal is at 2 pm (drink the Bulletproof coffee around 9 am).

That said, you can imagine my surprise when I measured my fasting blood sugar 30 minutes after waking and before eating anything. 98 yesterday and 93 today. Is this normal on paleo as the body's adaptation response for low carb/intermittent fasting? If not, any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting blood sugar? Life Extension just came out with a big article this month on how having a fasting blood sugar above 85 leads to a lot of maladies down the road (diabetes, weight gain, cardiovascular). I should add I'm 38 years old, 6'1" and 165 lbs. Ectomorph body type, have some fat around the abdomen that I'm trying to get rid of, hence starting paleo.

Thanks!

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on January 11, 2013
at 06:25 AM

Home glucose meters often give numbers that are very inaccurate. I wouldn't assume 98 and 93 are close to the real numbers. The cheapest device that can give you accurate numbers at home is a HemoCue 210. It costs about $400.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 11:34 PM

The first row of this table shows normal preprandial (fasting) blood glucose values in healthy subjects: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769652/table/tbl3/

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 09:41 PM

http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/16422495.php "A truly normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is Between 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) and 92 mg/dl (5.0 mmol/L). Doctors consider any fasting blood sugar between 70 mg/dl (3.9 mg/dl) and 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) to be normal. But several studies suggest that people whose fasting blood sugar is over 92 mg/dl (5.1 mmol/L) are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes over the next decade."

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 09:12 PM

98 is indeed below 100 but it still isn't normal. That's the reality.

B2634bf90fa31b48a60e7c4f06761200

(694)

on January 10, 2013
at 09:12 PM

Do you have the link to that Life Extension article?

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 09:07 PM

You are just plain wrong: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawn_phenomenon "Dawn phenomenon, sometimes called the dawn effect, is an early-morning (usually between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m.) increase in blood sugar (glucose) RELEVANT TO PEOPLE WITH DIABETES"

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 10, 2013
at 08:41 PM

No, it can affect anyone with a liver. Also, try to read for understanding...I said BELOW 100.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 07:52 PM

...and "Dawn Phenomenon" only affects people with diabetes.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 07:47 PM

A fasting BG of 100 mg/dl is not normal and probably isn't optimal. Most healthy non-diabetics test in the 80-85 mg/dl range.

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6 Answers

best answer

3
7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2030)

on January 11, 2013
at 04:21 AM

This happens to some people with a high fat diet, not sure why. Kaitlin's answer here suggests some things you could try and also this question discusses it in some detail. Peter at the hyperlipid did a post on this not too long ago:

http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.ca/search/label/Physiological%20insulin%20resistance%20%281%29

You can always just try upping your carb intake if your not a diabetic and your concerned about it.

best answer

3
D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on January 11, 2013
at 04:44 AM

This happens a lot and you shouldn't worry as long as your A1c is normal. That is, say between 4.0 and 5.5. Above that and you may be prediabetic and on the road to diabetes. It's due to lowered sensitivity to glucose, since you've been fat-adapted. If you take an OGTT test after low-carbing, you could fail. But as soon as you start eating normal amounts of carbs, your insulin sensitivity should return. This has been observed by umpteen people in the Paleosphere. From Peter D to Jenny Ruhl. Physiological insulin resistance. It's only temporary and is not a bad thing in itself. I certainly remember my FBG was never in the 80s when I was eating 50g of carbs. It was always between 90 and 100. Sometimes around 105. I know some people who have it even higher. The only way to check that your BG control is normal is to get your A1c reading, unless there's something wrong with your Hemoglobin (in that case, maybe check your fructosamine or try OGTT after eating 150 grams of carbs for a few days). Now that I eat 100-150g of carbs, my FBG is normally between 80 and 90.

1
Fdcd74757bc2e10f26aa1e881e2caf54

on January 10, 2013
at 07:25 PM

I would be happy with 98 & 93.

I also would like advice on what would be good paleo to eat at night. The thing to do is eat the most carbs at night, then during the night your blood sugar (bs) won't go too low.

IF you don't have enough carbs, you go really low, then your body says you need more glucose and so it sends that out spiking your bs. THEN when you wake in the morning your bs is high (higher than 100).

I am thinking fruit & nuts might be a good thing to eat before bedtime.

1
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 10, 2013
at 05:20 PM

Fasting below 100 is considered normal. Also, look up "Dawn Phenomenon."

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 07:52 PM

...and "Dawn Phenomenon" only affects people with diabetes.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 09:12 PM

98 is indeed below 100 but it still isn't normal. That's the reality.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 10, 2013
at 08:41 PM

No, it can affect anyone with a liver. Also, try to read for understanding...I said BELOW 100.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 09:41 PM

http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/16422495.php "A truly normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is Between 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) and 92 mg/dl (5.0 mmol/L). Doctors consider any fasting blood sugar between 70 mg/dl (3.9 mg/dl) and 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) to be normal. But several studies suggest that people whose fasting blood sugar is over 92 mg/dl (5.1 mmol/L) are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes over the next decade."

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 07:47 PM

A fasting BG of 100 mg/dl is not normal and probably isn't optimal. Most healthy non-diabetics test in the 80-85 mg/dl range.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 09:07 PM

You are just plain wrong: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawn_phenomenon "Dawn phenomenon, sometimes called the dawn effect, is an early-morning (usually between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m.) increase in blood sugar (glucose) RELEVANT TO PEOPLE WITH DIABETES"

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on January 10, 2013
at 11:34 PM

The first row of this table shows normal preprandial (fasting) blood glucose values in healthy subjects: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769652/table/tbl3/

0
B2634bf90fa31b48a60e7c4f06761200

on January 10, 2013
at 08:18 PM

My background, today is Day 30 for me following a low carb, high fat diet to achieve nutritional ketosis. I've been tracking my blood ketones and blood sugars as rigorously as possible...

and was dismayed when I noticed that my normal fasting blood sugars (even while previously following the 4 hour body slow carb diet) was in the high 90s, low 100s. I even had an HBA1c test that showed 5.7 which is the highest limit of normal possible! Needless to say this was very surprising.

According to Volek and Phinney.. this probably means I have some degree of carbohydrate intolerance.

When I started the ketosis experiment, I noticed that once I entered ketosis, as confirmed with the blood tests... my fasting blood sugars dropped into the 70s and 80s. After another 30 days I intend to do a followup HBA1c check to confirm that these changes persisted through out the course of the days.. You can check out my daily log on my website here

So in your case... I think you may be similar in having some degree of carbohydrate intolerance. Perhaps limiting your overall carb consumption would help.. or at least eating them on days when you exercise (used as post exercise meal/snack) would help lower your sugars.

Best of luck!

0
35deaf0f101526bb113ea69f79934f2b

(436)

on January 10, 2013
at 08:11 PM

Mine is about the same as yours and it has also worried me. I am 22 and have always been a healthy eater and very active so there isn't really a reason why mine should be high.

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