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Can we use coconut palm sugar on paleo?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 27, 2012 at 3:41 PM

Can we use coconut palm sugar on paleo?

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on July 16, 2013
at 04:03 AM

Just made some teriyaki chicken tonight with carrots and broccoli using tamari, coconut sugar, and garlic for the sauce. Came out great! The raw sugar has an almost caramel/butterscotch flavor.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 30, 2013
at 01:47 PM

The major component is sucrose ... which is glucose and fructose.

Ffff513ac686cd18c840ee12c79357ed

(1183)

on September 01, 2012
at 06:30 PM

Try www.marksdailyapple.com/the-definitive-guide-to-sugar/

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on September 01, 2012
at 09:14 AM

What I'm interested in is the glucose to fructose ratio. Anyone know? Honey and Maple Syrup have more reasonable ratios, being closer to fruit such as bananas. But Agave has the worst ratio of all syrups, something like 90/10. Anyone know the answer to this?

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on June 27, 2012
at 07:47 PM

If organic, you're definitely getting a product without additives if they are 100% certified organic. Not always the case. Even then, it's still a very refined food. For instance, 100% certified organic Agave Nectar...still awful for you.

Af49bced416926d9f88e47a7e705d99d

(20)

on June 27, 2012
at 06:43 PM

you think even if it's organic they could add other things to it? where does one find out about scams like that? don't products have to list what is in them or am i just naive? i have that organic raw coconut sugar... i forget the brand but they also produce palm nectar. i was actually thinking about that today. i heard that at least in the case of agave nectar the word nectar is just a nice way of saying high fructose, heavily processed. then is this the same case with coconut nectar? i suppose so... please weigh in y'all.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 27, 2012
at 06:23 PM

+1 I'm very skeptical of sweeteners marketed as low glycemic after the whole agave nectar thing. Sure it was technically low glycemic since it's almost totally fructose, but it sure isn't good for you or your liver.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on June 27, 2012
at 05:46 PM

you can do pretty much whatever you want. All of your choices have consequences. Sugar, no matter what kind, is not very nutritious. It also can have negative metabloic effects based on the amount/frequency. If you are talking a teaspoon in one cup of coffee per day, there is nothing wrong with regular sugar (Mark Sisson does this). In fact, regular sugar may be better than the artificial ones.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 27, 2012
at 03:57 PM

I think folks fool themselves into thinking coconut sugar is so much better than refined sugar cane sugar. "But it has minerals!" they say. But how much sugar are you going to eat to get a meaningful amount?

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10 Answers

6
Ffff513ac686cd18c840ee12c79357ed

(1183)

on June 27, 2012
at 03:51 PM

Sugar is sugar. Sugar is not typically considered paleo.

Lots of folks use honey and maple syrup and agave nectar and still call themselves "paleo". Don't stress over specifics. If you are using it to make a special treat, it may be a better choice than refined sugar.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 27, 2012
at 03:57 PM

I think folks fool themselves into thinking coconut sugar is so much better than refined sugar cane sugar. "But it has minerals!" they say. But how much sugar are you going to eat to get a meaningful amount?

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on September 01, 2012
at 09:14 AM

What I'm interested in is the glucose to fructose ratio. Anyone know? Honey and Maple Syrup have more reasonable ratios, being closer to fruit such as bananas. But Agave has the worst ratio of all syrups, something like 90/10. Anyone know the answer to this?

Ffff513ac686cd18c840ee12c79357ed

(1183)

on September 01, 2012
at 06:30 PM

Try www.marksdailyapple.com/the-definitive-guide-to-sugar/

4
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on June 27, 2012
at 05:51 PM

Timely question - In another thread I suggested someone make their own sriracha and what appears to be a very good recipe (including coconut or palm sugar) was posted, so I did research on the product (literally, just this morning).

It is sugar, so if you aren't down with sugar, probably not a good idea. It is also refined which soundly excludes it from my own personal concept of "Paleo". But your opinion may vary.

It supposedly has been tested - confirming considerably less Glycemic load than cane table sugar, turbinado, or any other "refined" sugar. But, the devil is in the details... the contents and glycemic load are said to vary because of differing processing techniques, so I'd advise smart sourcing of your coconut sugar.

Because of this, I figure using some in a condiment (homemade ketchup and homemade sriracha) would be better than eating something that isn't as enjoyable as The Real Thing. A tablespoon in a quart of homemade ketchup or a pint of homemade hot sauce probably won't be terrible. Calling it Paleo and giving yourself an excuse to start drinking sweetened beverages and desserts? Probably not the best route.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 27, 2012
at 06:23 PM

+1 I'm very skeptical of sweeteners marketed as low glycemic after the whole agave nectar thing. Sure it was technically low glycemic since it's almost totally fructose, but it sure isn't good for you or your liver.

3
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on June 27, 2012
at 03:51 PM

Many of us do. I would say it is one of the preferred sweeteners for paleo/primal eaters.

3
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on June 27, 2012
at 03:50 PM

Sugar is sugar.

2
52fd370dcdf28cdf9ab85d41c85cf3ec

(20)

on January 30, 2013
at 02:35 AM

I just googled the same thing - and read this from Sarah Wilson's blog (the sugar free chick):

"As you know, we???re interested in the fructose content ??? it???s the dangerous, fattening bit of sugar. Everyone gets excited about agave, which I???ve written about before. Agave is 90% fructose. So this is what the manufacturers of coconut sugar are saying:

The major component of coconut sugar is sucrose (70-79%) followed by glucose and fructose (3-9%) each. Minor variations will occur, due to differences in primary processing, raw material source, tree age and variety of coconut.

Good, yes? No! This is very tricky wording. Because sucrose ??? or just plain table sugar to you and me ??? is half fructose! So in effect coconut sugar???s between 38% and 48.5% fructose (I did the maths just now). Which???is about the same as sugar and honey. Back to square one???Thought I???d just share???."

Hope this helps :)

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 30, 2013
at 01:47 PM

The major component is sucrose ... which is glucose and fructose.

2
24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on June 27, 2012
at 05:13 PM

I'm cool with using a little bit here & there! As long as it doesn't make you feel bad & you don't find yourself using it as a crutch to keep sugar cravings alive, I'd enjoy it in moderation. Things like coconut sugar & "paleofied" baked goods helped me ease into healthier eating- don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good :)

1
E3029db5b6269d0761ae1e4a723b86bc

on July 15, 2013
at 11:42 PM

I consider myself on a paleo diet. I have no health or weight problems and I eat alot of coconut sugar, honey, all fruit jams, baked goods with coconut flour and coconut sugar, and many other sweet things. Cane sugar has no nutrient value and spikes blood insulin levels toM much higher rates than most other sugars. I also eat alot of meat, green veggies, healthy fats, etc. Whatever you want to call it, just stay away from cane sugar, beet sugar, hydrogenated fats and oils, high fructose corn syrup, dairy, grains, gluten, and anything artificial and you will not have any problems with weight. Exercise too. It really helps.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on July 16, 2013
at 04:03 AM

Just made some teriyaki chicken tonight with carrots and broccoli using tamari, coconut sugar, and garlic for the sauce. Came out great! The raw sugar has an almost caramel/butterscotch flavor.

0
B5141236ad924674a96803ee1ccccaf1

(485)

on April 07, 2013
at 01:02 PM

i work at Coracao raw chocolates http://www.coracaoconfections.com/

As with all things respectful moderation is critical to a healthy relationship with coco sugar. But as sweet vices go, coco sugar is probably the cleanest option

http://sjewelln.wordpress.com/

0
4bc78c83a3260ea68e3d66bae7f764da

on April 07, 2013
at 05:29 AM

I use it in moderation, not on a daily basis and only certified organic. Although not strictly Paleo, if you feel that you need some sugar on occasions, in my opinion it is better than most of the alternatives.

0
68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on June 27, 2012
at 03:53 PM

People still use AOL?

I've never seen an email address in the subject line either.

Read this. http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/coconut_palm_sugar.htm.

I would also be concerned that Coconut Palm Sugar is A) processed/refined and B) very rarely, if EVER packaged as pure. Like many sweeteners, they can get away with listing it as "Coconut Palm Sugar" when a majority of the product make up is other garbage.

If it's pure, I'd say it's better than other things. I'm skeptical of it though.

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on June 27, 2012
at 07:47 PM

If organic, you're definitely getting a product without additives if they are 100% certified organic. Not always the case. Even then, it's still a very refined food. For instance, 100% certified organic Agave Nectar...still awful for you.

Af49bced416926d9f88e47a7e705d99d

(20)

on June 27, 2012
at 06:43 PM

you think even if it's organic they could add other things to it? where does one find out about scams like that? don't products have to list what is in them or am i just naive? i have that organic raw coconut sugar... i forget the brand but they also produce palm nectar. i was actually thinking about that today. i heard that at least in the case of agave nectar the word nectar is just a nice way of saying high fructose, heavily processed. then is this the same case with coconut nectar? i suppose so... please weigh in y'all.

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