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Saturated fat and marriage

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 25, 2012 at 9:42 PM

Anyone see this study? The study isn't finished yet but there was a press release. My guess is this study isn't going to be interesting. Thoughts? The article mentions that fast food and take-out is often high in saturated fat. Later it says that two meals were served and blood samples were taken, with one higher in saturated fat. Are they serving fast food for one and a healthy salad for the other and if so then are they accounting for all the other differences between those meals? At the end of the press release is a statement about the release of cytokines from adipose cells. Why are they testing dietary intake of fats then?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:37 PM

Yeah, that's not good science to announce your hypothesis is correct even before you start, but I'm sure they thought this was a groundbreaking, emergency finding that could not wait for the data. Yes, we all thought fast food was sooo healthy, thank goodness these people are here to show us the light.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:20 PM

Based on their publicity so far it seems like there's a real risk of confirmation bias here. They've nearly announced the conclusion before they even have the data from the study!

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:32 AM

I think we just hacked the studies?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:31 AM

That sounds reasonable! It might be why some fitness types recommend eating protein and fat meals OR protein and carb meals, not combining carbs and fats. Both are used as alternative sources of energy, so it would make sense the eating both at once might make your body prioritize with the glucose leaving some FFAs in the bloodstream and inhibiting vasodilation.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:26 AM

Just had another thought about this, as to whether the vasoconstriction still happens in someone who is in ketosis, I think it would be a given most test subjects are glucose burners. I'm just thinking about when I've been in deep ketosis, and am pretty much only eating animal products, I don't get that slowed down feeling after a meal. Maybe it is trying to digest a mixture of foods that takes some extra down time for the body to separate and file away properly.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 25, 2012
at 11:43 PM

haha, thanks for the heads up HN (no pun intended, lol). I usually do stick to sushi or seafood!

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 25, 2012
at 11:12 PM

I read some of the pubmed studies about that. I need to do more research to get you something definitive, but in the meantime if you are on a date that might be going somewhere maybe stick to sushi instead of a porterhouse. I suspect that digesting fat specifically takes more work, I know it needs a lot of effort on the part of the gal bladder. Could be a built in "don't over hunt" fail-safe switch, because sprinting after a heavy meal just isn't going to happen.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 25, 2012
at 11:07 PM

PS not being snippy just genuinely curious.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 25, 2012
at 11:04 PM

You're smart :) From what I understand in studies meals that don't contain added fat to them do not reduce vasodilation, even though the meals are still being digested. Why is this?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 25, 2012
at 10:56 PM

As I understand it that is a transient effect following meals to aid in digestion. Limp noodle should not be a problem once a meal is full digested unless the individual has some serious liver problems and can't digest the fat properly leaving excessive ffa's in the bloodstream.

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2 Answers

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6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 25, 2012
at 10:51 PM

Yeah, I saw that, looks.....lacking.

Sure you can test whether saturated fat makes couples more likely to argue or feel more stress, but unless they are also testing for the other differences between fast food and whatever their control healthy meal is, I doubt the whole thing means much. Using fast food vs. "a healthy meal" isn't really the way I'd go about this, too many variables. Fast food is full of craaaaazy chemicals, people are likely to order a HFCS filled beverage to go with that burger, the fries are full of trans fats and fried in oil with additional silicone additives to keep the oil from foaming. Not to mention, when families resort to fast food, they are likely to already be in the midst of a stressful time-crunched day. I kind of like where I think they are going with this study, to try and steer people towards home cooking, but I doubt their hypothesis is going to hold up unless they don't differentiate between trans fats and saturated fats. In some past studies trans fats have been shown to increase aggression and stress hormones, saturated fat has been shown to reduce it. But you know, the easiest way to get funding for a nutritional study in the last 30 years in the US has been to say you are studying some negative side effect of saturated fat, so I can't really blame them for wanting to stay employed.

I also think it comes across as an annoying blame the victim, "stupid poor people" study, which frankly I've had just about enough of. If we really want to shift people away from relying on fast food for the bulk of their meals we have to a) actually have grocery stores in every neighborhood, and b) restructure society so that the working poor and lower middle class don't have to work 2-4 full time jobs per household just to pay the rent, and rely on fast cheap food because there isn't the time, energy, or funds for healthy food.

My N=1 is that we tend to have the most stressful arguments when we are hungry, and the cure is a nice fatty meal. After sharing a cheese plate, osso bucco, a lovely chunk of meat, and dessert (all high fat foods) we are much more likely to just sit there and smile contentedly at each other, even if we had been quite snippy and arguing before dinner.

If someone served me liver and onions for one meal, and then a plate of steamed vegetables and rice for another meal, I think I'd feel much more argumentative after the latter if only because of the blood sugar dysregulation.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 26, 2012
at 05:37 PM

Yeah, that's not good science to announce your hypothesis is correct even before you start, but I'm sure they thought this was a groundbreaking, emergency finding that could not wait for the data. Yes, we all thought fast food was sooo healthy, thank goodness these people are here to show us the light.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:20 PM

Based on their publicity so far it seems like there's a real risk of confirmation bias here. They've nearly announced the conclusion before they even have the data from the study!

0
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on April 25, 2012
at 10:19 PM

Well, fat decreases vosodilaiation, thereby reducing blood flow throughout the body. This would be bad for one's sexual health, and thereby bad for a marriage.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 25, 2012
at 11:07 PM

PS not being snippy just genuinely curious.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 25, 2012
at 11:12 PM

I read some of the pubmed studies about that. I need to do more research to get you something definitive, but in the meantime if you are on a date that might be going somewhere maybe stick to sushi instead of a porterhouse. I suspect that digesting fat specifically takes more work, I know it needs a lot of effort on the part of the gal bladder. Could be a built in "don't over hunt" fail-safe switch, because sprinting after a heavy meal just isn't going to happen.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:31 AM

That sounds reasonable! It might be why some fitness types recommend eating protein and fat meals OR protein and carb meals, not combining carbs and fats. Both are used as alternative sources of energy, so it would make sense the eating both at once might make your body prioritize with the glucose leaving some FFAs in the bloodstream and inhibiting vasodilation.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 25, 2012
at 11:04 PM

You're smart :) From what I understand in studies meals that don't contain added fat to them do not reduce vasodilation, even though the meals are still being digested. Why is this?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:32 AM

I think we just hacked the studies?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 25, 2012
at 11:43 PM

haha, thanks for the heads up HN (no pun intended, lol). I usually do stick to sushi or seafood!

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 26, 2012
at 03:26 AM

Just had another thought about this, as to whether the vasoconstriction still happens in someone who is in ketosis, I think it would be a given most test subjects are glucose burners. I'm just thinking about when I've been in deep ketosis, and am pretty much only eating animal products, I don't get that slowed down feeling after a meal. Maybe it is trying to digest a mixture of foods that takes some extra down time for the body to separate and file away properly.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 25, 2012
at 10:56 PM

As I understand it that is a transient effect following meals to aid in digestion. Limp noodle should not be a problem once a meal is full digested unless the individual has some serious liver problems and can't digest the fat properly leaving excessive ffa's in the bloodstream.

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