0

votes

Brush your teeth, improve mental health! Hack this article...

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 21, 2012 at 3:36 PM

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/21/us-dementia-teeth-idUSBRE87K06D20120821

Here is a fine example of our millions of tax dollars going towards public health studies, and this is what they come up with.

How can the medical community be so unscientific with these studies? Are they even doctors or just a bunch of social science bureaucrats?

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on August 21, 2012
at 09:15 PM

Correct on both accounts.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 21, 2012
at 06:34 PM

not correlation -- The study merely opines on coincidence. Coincidence occurs when there is not a theoretic explanation of the connection between two events. Correlation occurs when there is a theoretic explanation. Causality occurs when one event predictably effects the outcome of another event. It may seem subtle, but it's very important to differentiate between the three.

61c3d2c07376ee667da321cc20a1e94b

(466)

on August 21, 2012
at 06:13 PM

Okay, perhaps you're right. I guess I misinterpreted the article as it initially seemed to suggest dental health was the causation of dementia, but reading it again it suggested there is a correlation.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 21, 2012
at 04:38 PM

This study does not suggest correlation or causation. Merely coincidence. Most observational studies try to get their name in the paper by framing the results in correctly. This is not one of those cases.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 21, 2012
at 04:31 PM

read the entire article: Of 78 women who said they brushed their teeth less than once a day in 1992, 21 had dementia by 2010, or about one case per 3.7 women. In comparison, among those who brushed at least once a day, closer to one in every 4.5 women developed dementia which translates to a 65-percent greater chance of dementia among those who brushed less than daily.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on August 21, 2012
at 04:03 PM

It might have to do with an inherent forgetfulness and negligence rather than the actual act of teeth-brushing. Correlation does not imply causation!

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3 Answers

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2
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 21, 2012
at 04:37 PM

I'm not sure what is bad science here. A link between oral health and physical health has been known for years. This is an observational study, observational studies are very powerful tools to help us figure out where to look. They are not saying A causes B or even that there is a correlation. All they are saying is that there is a coincidence of these two factors.

"...it may be that your oral health habits influence whether or not you get dementia," said Annlia Paganini-Hill

Look at the statement "it MAY BE that your oral health habits INFLUENCE whether or not you get dementia".

This is standard, good science to identify potential connections that will require further research to understand. There's a lot of bad science out there, this report is not one of them.

Here's another quote: "Statistically, however, the effect was so small it could have been due to chance, the researchers said." -- imagine that, scientist admitting there is not a statistical correlation -- What bad science.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 21, 2012
at 06:34 PM

not correlation -- The study merely opines on coincidence. Coincidence occurs when there is not a theoretic explanation of the connection between two events. Correlation occurs when there is a theoretic explanation. Causality occurs when one event predictably effects the outcome of another event. It may seem subtle, but it's very important to differentiate between the three.

61c3d2c07376ee667da321cc20a1e94b

(466)

on August 21, 2012
at 06:13 PM

Okay, perhaps you're right. I guess I misinterpreted the article as it initially seemed to suggest dental health was the causation of dementia, but reading it again it suggested there is a correlation.

2
2336245491a87ee15d4fb8f8f8283909

(1173)

on August 21, 2012
at 04:02 PM

BS (bad science) is abundant in medical science....you have to wonder sometimes.

I was under the impression that alzheimer's was type 3 diabetes.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on August 21, 2012
at 09:15 PM

Correct on both accounts.

0
F891e7b1cbbbe3838c9bba9ff78aa3ed

on August 21, 2012
at 04:19 PM

In comparison, among those who brushed at least once a day, closer to one in every 4.5 women developed dementia which translates to a 65-percent greater chance of dementia among those who brushed less than daily.

Can someone explain that to me? I thought the people who brushed at least once a day would have LESS of a chance of developing dementia than the people who brushed less than daily. Or am I reading it wrong??

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 21, 2012
at 04:31 PM

read the entire article: Of 78 women who said they brushed their teeth less than once a day in 1992, 21 had dementia by 2010, or about one case per 3.7 women. In comparison, among those who brushed at least once a day, closer to one in every 4.5 women developed dementia which translates to a 65-percent greater chance of dementia among those who brushed less than daily.

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