0

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did I just ruin the chicken stock?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 17, 2012 at 7:02 AM

Here's my sob story.... bought a nice organic free range chicken, using the slow cooker, got the meat off and was making some nice thick stock with the carcass and giblets.... let it simmer for a solid 36 hours.... strained it into some tupperwear and..... LEFT IT ON THE COUNTER OVERNIGHT!!! what an idiot....

So question... to me this sounds like asking for trouble, I feel like room temp stock is practically a bacterial amusement park...

1) what risks am I taking with this? a minor upset stomach or full on poisoning myself? 2)if I boil it will that make it safe? 3)what if I reduce it down to just the fat

thanks in advance! -p

1e58ba5c171a122541d8b4873f604327

(229)

on May 19, 2012
at 04:05 AM

awesome thanks for the info!!

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on May 17, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Forgot the link: http://paleodietlifestyle.com/making-fresh-bone-stock/ When I made chicken stock I'd cook it during the day for chicken soup and eat it fresh. When I now make beef stock for 24-36 hours I cool it fast in the sink/cold water, strain several times and put it straight in the fridge, next day in the freezer after removing top fat layer. If I leave it on the countertop it would use up all space, I just wouldn't forget... Unless you're at the North Pole I think I'd toss it...

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on May 17, 2012
at 05:42 PM

Here's a link on how to make broth the easy, simple, general way. I also have stock sitting in the freezer right now in plastic but after it was in pyrex in the fridge overnight. I just need to get more pyrex so I can also freeze broth (and other foods) in it. And more freezer space... If yours is really spoiled right now I can't say, I'd say if your kitchen is really cold at night and the broth still smells good I'd boil it and taste test. If your kitchen is more like mine and summer warm I think I'd play it safe and toss. Continued...

1e58ba5c171a122541d8b4873f604327

(229)

on May 17, 2012
at 05:01 PM

hm interesting.... that sounds like dhs resturant code, which I agree makes sense if you are serving people food in a business setting.... but when that was written we thought all bacteria was bad and we didn't even know it existed in our gut! The way I understand it, the toxins are what make it smell bad.... so the smell test should be pretty accurate in that? After all we observed a sense of disgust when we smell something thats rotten, I know it's not perfect but this seems to make sense...?

1e58ba5c171a122541d8b4873f604327

(229)

on May 17, 2012
at 04:58 PM

hm... you obviously have way more experience than me.... just a note, I did let the stock cool before pouring into tupperwear, and I did put some in pyrex, but the rest in tupperwear. Do you know if there is any negatives to leaving it longer? Is it just not neccisary to leave it more than a few hours or is it harmful? thanks for the long response!

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7 Answers

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2
4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on May 17, 2012
at 01:28 PM

There are several aspects in your story that differ completely from how I used to make chicken stock (I can't eat chicken anymore but that's a different story, I now make beef stock exclusively). First I think you are not supposed to cook chicken bones for 36 hours, with chicken I think 12 hours is the upper limit, 4-6 hours is the norm. You place the whole chicken without all the innards (that usually come in a bag stuck inside the chicken) with your veggies in a pot and let simmer for 2 hours, then remove all the meat and save in the fridge for later, for the soup. You then let the bones and veggies continue to simmer for another 2-4 hours. That's it. You then cool and strain it by your methods of choice but I would NEVER strain hot or warm fatty broth straight into plastic tupperware, always pots or pyrex glass first!! The temperature and fat content will make the plastic leak into the broth fast and efficiently.
I personally would toss the whole thing because of all the plastic in it, and next time you stick it in the fridge overnight, in a COLD pot (not the one you cooked in) or pyrex, and don't leave it out on the counter. I guess it also depends on the temperature in the kitchen. Chicken stock and soup is more of a winter thing with cool/cold kitchens. Mine is currently at 78 F with A/C blasting and leaving the stove on for hours seems completely off right now.
Chicken stock and soup are made from the old hens that don't lay eggs any longer, they are slaughtered in fall/winter, in the summer they are busy helping raise the new chicks. You then kill the young roosters before they start killing each other, they are the fryers. At least that's the way it's always been where I come from.

1e58ba5c171a122541d8b4873f604327

(229)

on May 17, 2012
at 04:58 PM

hm... you obviously have way more experience than me.... just a note, I did let the stock cool before pouring into tupperwear, and I did put some in pyrex, but the rest in tupperwear. Do you know if there is any negatives to leaving it longer? Is it just not neccisary to leave it more than a few hours or is it harmful? thanks for the long response!

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on May 17, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Forgot the link: http://paleodietlifestyle.com/making-fresh-bone-stock/ When I made chicken stock I'd cook it during the day for chicken soup and eat it fresh. When I now make beef stock for 24-36 hours I cool it fast in the sink/cold water, strain several times and put it straight in the fridge, next day in the freezer after removing top fat layer. If I leave it on the countertop it would use up all space, I just wouldn't forget... Unless you're at the North Pole I think I'd toss it...

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on May 17, 2012
at 05:42 PM

Here's a link on how to make broth the easy, simple, general way. I also have stock sitting in the freezer right now in plastic but after it was in pyrex in the fridge overnight. I just need to get more pyrex so I can also freeze broth (and other foods) in it. And more freezer space... If yours is really spoiled right now I can't say, I'd say if your kitchen is really cold at night and the broth still smells good I'd boil it and taste test. If your kitchen is more like mine and summer warm I think I'd play it safe and toss. Continued...

1e58ba5c171a122541d8b4873f604327

(229)

on May 19, 2012
at 04:05 AM

awesome thanks for the info!!

3
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 17, 2012
at 01:05 PM

Don't eat it. "Leaving food out too long at room temperature can cause bacteria (such as Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Campylobacter) to grow to dangerous levels that can cause illness. Bacteria grow most rapidly in the range of temperatures between 40 ??F and 140 ??F, doubling in number in as little as 20 minutes. This range of temperatures is often called the "Danger Zone."" http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Factsheets/Danger_Zone/index.asp

Reheating won't make it safe. It's not just the bacteria; it's the toxins produced by the bacteria. "Toxigenesis, or the ability to produce toxins, is an underlying mechanism by which many bacterial pathogens produce disease." http://textbookofbacteriology.net/proteintoxins.html

1e58ba5c171a122541d8b4873f604327

(229)

on May 17, 2012
at 05:01 PM

hm interesting.... that sounds like dhs resturant code, which I agree makes sense if you are serving people food in a business setting.... but when that was written we thought all bacteria was bad and we didn't even know it existed in our gut! The way I understand it, the toxins are what make it smell bad.... so the smell test should be pretty accurate in that? After all we observed a sense of disgust when we smell something thats rotten, I know it's not perfect but this seems to make sense...?

2
B97bb053b69b8a1e404c226afced44a0

on May 17, 2012
at 12:31 PM

Lots of people leave their stock on the stove until it's gone, they just boil it before each use. Obviously, if it smells bad, toss it. Otherwise, I'd just bring it to a boil for a few minutes and then use it. I've had mine out all day when I left it to cool and forgot about it, too - no problems once I boiled it and put it in the fridge. Good luck.

2
6ec8d30130a6fb274871314533b5536b

(581)

on May 17, 2012
at 09:10 AM

My mom leaves soups & stocks out on the stove overnight all the time... she'll reboil it in the morning, we eat some, then it gets left out again... repeat the next day. Pretty much until it's gone, or until it's got that gross moldy film on top of it. It's somewhat weird to me now as an adult and I usually try to make sure it's refrigerated by at least day 2~3, but I didn't think anything of it growing up. And honestly? I think we're all stronger & heartier for it. Lol.

Oh, and none of us have ever gotten sick or food poisoning from food we've eaten at home.

0
193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on May 17, 2012
at 01:18 PM

I'd eat it, but we leave stuff out all the time. Only once have I gotten sick from doing that, and it was food from a restaurant. I'd say if you heat it up again it'll kill off all of the bacteria. But I'm old school.

0
Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

on May 17, 2012
at 12:50 PM

This happened to me the other day. I ended up tossing it. My friend got a weird disease from eating pizza left out overnight and I've been very careful ever since. It's probably fine, but I'm just a little paranoid.

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on May 17, 2012
at 07:42 AM

I have done this more than once and I used it to make soup after boiling it. No ill effects! I did add quite a bit of garlic to it though.....

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