2

votes

Have you tried stinging nettles?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 31, 2012 at 10:35 PM

there's a nature reserve nearby with new growth forest and the ground is covered in them...I'm thinking they could be a good money saving spinach substitute?

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on August 01, 2012
at 08:31 PM

smackles, when you cook them they lose their stingers/stinginess. I've had stinging nettle stew before, it's delicious.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 01, 2012
at 07:58 PM

@ Korion- yes, neither am I. It is common wisdom though, and I really don't know enough to dispute it. That was just the only potential downside I could site for it. But then again, by definition anything is going to have downsides in excess or in deficiency.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 01, 2012
at 05:00 PM

It's still not sure if DHT causes baldness.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 01, 2012
at 04:59 PM

No but they tried stining me

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 01, 2012
at 12:11 PM

I think it's a normal thing. Obviously too much of anything is a bad thing, and so is too little. For this reason I think it's unwise to mess with powerful herbs that impact your enocrine hormones.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 01, 2012
at 12:10 PM

I know that like 5% of T gets converted to DHT, and DHT cannot be aromatized like regular testosterone can (yay!). Everything I've read abotu DHT aside from hair loss sounds great. WHat are the downsides?

B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on August 01, 2012
at 10:49 AM

That would make them easier to digest, yes.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on August 01, 2012
at 10:01 AM

absolutely when they are YOUNG. There is a chemical change that occurs when the plant blooms that makes them not so healthy to eat anymore.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 01, 2012
at 09:03 AM

Reducing DHT is not a bad thing. Testosterone and DHT are not the same thing. Reducing testosterone, however, is not a good idea. Reducing DHT does not mean you will be reducing testosterone.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on August 01, 2012
at 05:20 AM

Oh, and I have eaten them in soups. They have a high vitamin C content.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on August 01, 2012
at 04:39 AM

Fantastic if you get them while they are young. I'd only eat them in the Spring.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on August 01, 2012
at 04:23 AM

It is usually recommended in folk medicine for heavy menstrual bleeding.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:51 AM

P.S. - Use gloves when handling the raw leaves, both in harvesting and in the kitchen!

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:40 AM

Re: #2 - I have mild PCOS and took stinging nettle extract in an attempt to lower my androgen levels. So there you go. Might not want to make it a regular thing, especially if you're male.

Bf2291448a06d573f0fdc87cd514e512

(519)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:35 AM

As a landscapist, I don't know if this is a joke or not. I will never put them near my mouth. Ever. I don't care if cooking them destroys their evil.

0b4326a4949718451a8571b82558dc10

(2349)

on July 31, 2012
at 11:41 PM

*after cooking of course

0b4326a4949718451a8571b82558dc10

(2349)

on July 31, 2012
at 11:41 PM

put them in a blender maybe to make the fiber easier to digest?

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9 Answers

7
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on July 31, 2012
at 11:04 PM

I had some at a restaurant and they were really tasty!

One time I was going swimming at a secret watering hole, and on the way down to it nature called. As I was finishing up I fell over, with my swimsuit bottoms down, and fell on top of a stinging nettle plant. Got the stingers all up my leg and bottom. Now I make a point to eat nettle whenever I can... you know, for revenge.

4
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:20 AM

It makes a great spinach substitute. You have to pick it young. It is not good when the plant is older. Another good edible is wild mustard and wild horseradish. Also good is Plantain elongata. I eat all these things often.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on August 01, 2012
at 10:01 AM

absolutely when they are YOUNG. There is a chemical change that occurs when the plant blooms that makes them not so healthy to eat anymore.

2
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on July 31, 2012
at 10:54 PM

Not really.

  1. You can only consume young stinging nettles without any problems. However, once the plants are mature, the fiber gets too tough and they are difficult to digest.

  2. Stinging nettles have medicinal properties and it is basically like consuming a herb. The plant is not as safe as spinach and has some kind affect on blood etc.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on August 01, 2012
at 04:23 AM

It is usually recommended in folk medicine for heavy menstrual bleeding.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:40 AM

Re: #2 - I have mild PCOS and took stinging nettle extract in an attempt to lower my androgen levels. So there you go. Might not want to make it a regular thing, especially if you're male.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on August 01, 2012
at 05:20 AM

Oh, and I have eaten them in soups. They have a high vitamin C content.

1
F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:51 AM

Yup, gotta get 'em young in the spring, but then yes, a great spinach substitute in soups and stews. Uber nutritious.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on August 01, 2012
at 01:51 AM

P.S. - Use gloves when handling the raw leaves, both in harvesting and in the kitchen!

1
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on July 31, 2012
at 11:47 PM

As a spinach sub, I'd maybe stick to gathering dandelion greens instead if you can find them. (Saute with plenty of fat and add a little acid at the end to counteract the pretty extreme bitterness.)

Young nettles are good in pesto and teas, but I wouldn't want to eat mature nettles. I'm guessing they're pretty fibrous.

1
B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on July 31, 2012
at 11:33 PM

As the fibre is tough to digest it's best to use them in stews/soups or like tinctures. They're very high in calcium, ~430mg per cup, and is lower in oxalates so the calcium is better utilised.

0b4326a4949718451a8571b82558dc10

(2349)

on July 31, 2012
at 11:41 PM

*after cooking of course

0b4326a4949718451a8571b82558dc10

(2349)

on July 31, 2012
at 11:41 PM

put them in a blender maybe to make the fiber easier to digest?

B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on August 01, 2012
at 10:49 AM

That would make them easier to digest, yes.

0
B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on August 01, 2012
at 04:58 PM

I use them in all kinds of ways. Yummy! (A web search for nettle recipes will give you lots of ideas.) When we've had enough of fresh nettle, I dehydrate and powder some for use in stews and such in the winter.

0
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on August 01, 2012
at 03:52 AM

I was just talking to someone about nettles last week! You got to harvest them when they are young, the peak of the season is in March, I think. Use gloves to handle them until after they're cooked. Remove the leaves and blanch them (in a pot of boiling water then immerse in ice water) to inactivate the stingers which contain formic acid and histamine. Wring them out and use in your recipe. MDA has one here for pesto.

0
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on August 01, 2012
at 01:56 AM

No. If you're a guy I'd stay away from them. They are traditionally used to help with Male-pattern-baldness by reducing DHT levels. That is not a good thing if you are a male, as DHT is responsible for many of our characteristically masculine features.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on August 01, 2012
at 05:00 PM

It's still not sure if DHT causes baldness.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 01, 2012
at 12:11 PM

I think it's a normal thing. Obviously too much of anything is a bad thing, and so is too little. For this reason I think it's unwise to mess with powerful herbs that impact your enocrine hormones.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 01, 2012
at 09:03 AM

Reducing DHT is not a bad thing. Testosterone and DHT are not the same thing. Reducing testosterone, however, is not a good idea. Reducing DHT does not mean you will be reducing testosterone.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 01, 2012
at 12:10 PM

I know that like 5% of T gets converted to DHT, and DHT cannot be aromatized like regular testosterone can (yay!). Everything I've read abotu DHT aside from hair loss sounds great. WHat are the downsides?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 01, 2012
at 07:58 PM

@ Korion- yes, neither am I. It is common wisdom though, and I really don't know enough to dispute it. That was just the only potential downside I could site for it. But then again, by definition anything is going to have downsides in excess or in deficiency.

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