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How to test the effects of artificial sweeteners on yourself?

Answered on July 16, 2014
Created July 15, 2014 at 2:55 AM

So I eat artificial sweeteners in small amounts about 2-3 times per day. I eat fairly low carb the rest of the time, and absolutely nothing with added sugars. So stevia and occasionally splenda really help me with my sweet tooth.

I'm just wondering if there's a way I can find out of these things are bad for me and if so how bad. I'm wondering what I can do to explore this issue.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 15, 2014
at 04:30 PM

I have done virtually no research into xylitol -- so I have no idea from a health status. But I would consider xylitol a sugar substitute, but not an artificial sweetener.

5b9a25a1a676397a25579dfad59e1d7b

(2318)

on July 15, 2014
at 04:19 PM

would xylitol be considered an artificial or natural sweetener?

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2 Answers

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on July 16, 2014
at 10:25 AM

Why would you want to? Even if the cancer-aspertame study wasn't accepted, who knows whether the reason for it was actual flaws in the study or monied interests? It's still an excitotoxin, it can still convert to formaldehyde depending on how it was stored.

Even stuff like splenda which is two sugar molecules bonded by chlorine shows that it's only partially eliminted, so the rest must be absorbed by the body and who knows where it winds up and what the effect is?

At least with stevia (the pure stuff), we know what the side effects are. With sugar alcohols at most, you'll cause GI upset, and at worse it's not going to be much more harmful than alcohol.

But the real question is, why do you need to artificially sweeten your food? The answer is that on a typical SAD, your senses were so previously overwhelmed by hyperpalatable, hypersweetened foods that your taste buds are no longer reacting normally. If you go cold turkey instead, you'll find that things that you though were bland and not sweet will seem sweet, and your old pre-paleo foods will seem incredibly sweet.

For example, if you buy an unsweetened coconut water, you'll find it bland. Once your taste buds return to normal, you'll find even coconut water to be very sweet.

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 15, 2014
at 12:31 PM

stevia is a natural, zero calorie sweetener. it is not an artificial sweetener.

The question about artificial sweeteners is harder. Personally, I do not consume them because I believe that it's better to break the habit of consuming sweets than it is to try to find a hack. But here's the current state of the research as I know it:

1) Artificial sweeteners (in particular aspartame) does not cause cancer:

- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?Db=pubmed&Cmd=S...

- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20835749

- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19661082

2) Even the famous, Cancer in Rats, study is no longer an accepted result:

- http://www.efsa.europa.eu/EFSA/Scientific_Opinion/...

3) People who choose to consume drink sweetened with aspartame, typically consume more calories in their daily diet than they would if they choose drinks sweetened with sugar. However, substituting aspartame for sugar in a blinded fashion show that calories are reduced, contributing to weight loss.

- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC289276...

5b9a25a1a676397a25579dfad59e1d7b

(2318)

on July 15, 2014
at 04:19 PM

would xylitol be considered an artificial or natural sweetener?

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