4

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Could Simple Steak Marinades Release Excessive Quantities of Excitatory Amino Acids?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 24, 2011 at 4:36 PM

I have for some time now been plagued with intermittent bouts of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). For the uninitiated, it's a pronounced feeling of a "skipped" beat that is really difficult to ignore when the frequency is high and the heart rate is elevated (i.e. during activity).

Doing some research, I've found that MSG and aspartame are known triggers of PVCs. It's tempting to think of these as strange chemicals, but they're really just delivery devices of the ubiquitous glutamic and aspartic amino acids, respectively. We use these amino acids as transmitters in the body and those two are known to have an excitatory effect. There's a lot of talk lately about "excitotoxins" but the primary two are these simple amino acids that we consume in fairly large amounts any time we eat most protein sources.

Now, obviously this isn't an argument against necessarily avoiding even those protein sources which contain the most glutamic acid for example (casein) because the total excitatory load is roughly the same as beef and the liberation of these amino acids would be just as slow during normal digestion. What I'm wondering is if predigesting meat with a marinade is capable of creating a flood of these amino acids when it's eaten that is much faster than would normally occur.

I've been on a fool's errand lately trying to correct this problem with electrolyte-balancing, but on a recent trip I got PVCs first following the flight (ran out of gum and had to use the standard aspartame-laden type) and again after eating a steak at a restaurant. I assumed that the steak had actual MSG added to it, but since I experienced this problem last night and today from eating a steak with a homemade marinade that consisted only of macadamia nut oil, vinegar and spices, I'm beginning to think that homemade marinades are able to simulate the effect of MSG or aspartame added to foods. I'm no taste-expert, but the palatibility of marinaded steaks is in my opinion far beyond what the constituent ingredients should be able to offer.

I can't really fathom how soaking meat in acetic acid overnight would not be able to liberate all sorts of amino acids, and if the amino acid proportion of beef (by weight) as glutamic acid is 15% and aspartic acid is 9.1%, there should be a significant amount of these hitting the bloodstream far more rapidly than would occur with normally cooked meat.

It may be tempting to dismiss this if one doesn't experience any such symptoms, but perhaps susceptible individuals such as myself are canaries in the coal mine, as it were. Perhaps all of us experience the overloading and death of neurons as a result of the excitotoxic effects of frequently eating predigested meat in large quantities. I, for one, am not going to use marinades anymore.

Something to think about anyway.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 25, 2011
at 04:47 AM

My triggers are exercise, chocolate, lack of sleep, akward situations, coconut. (On top of the food other food things).

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 25, 2011
at 04:45 AM

If you are having PVCs. This might be worth a n=1 or investigating: http://www.lifeextensionvitamins.com/cadico11thh.html

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 25, 2011
at 04:31 AM

I think it's unlikely unless you are marinading meat or fermenting proteins.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on October 25, 2011
at 02:33 AM

Is it possible/probable to get an excess of glutamic acid on a protein-rich, whole foods diet?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 24, 2011
at 10:09 PM

I'd like to see some in vivo experiment that show this.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 24, 2011
at 09:02 PM

That neuronal apoptosis occurs as a result of excess glutamic acid is not controversial; it's a well-documented phenomenon. A "healthy individual" may not notice it, but that doesn't mean it's not happening.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 24, 2011
at 08:07 PM

It's pretty funny because the lasted WAPF Wise Traditions newsletter basically says pork WITHOUT marinades is bad for you.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 24, 2011
at 08:07 PM

There is no evidence I've ever seen that excitotoxins harm healthy individuals.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 24, 2011
at 08:02 PM

Same goes for potassium and sodium for me. I feel a lot better without any added salt in my diet. I think the K:Na ratio in meat (roughly 4:1) is as low as it should go.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 24, 2011
at 08:01 PM

I too get it from too much calcium in relation to magnesium, but I have triggers outside of that.

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3 Answers

2
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 24, 2011
at 07:27 PM

I also have heart rythm issues and they occur most often when my mag is low or sodium overpowers potassium. Eating out causes me issues. I cook without any marinades etc unless they are from scratch. Also too much calcium causes issues for me. This is all cellular health that would benefit anyone.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 25, 2011
at 04:47 AM

My triggers are exercise, chocolate, lack of sleep, akward situations, coconut. (On top of the food other food things).

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 25, 2011
at 04:45 AM

If you are having PVCs. This might be worth a n=1 or investigating: http://www.lifeextensionvitamins.com/cadico11thh.html

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 24, 2011
at 08:02 PM

Same goes for potassium and sodium for me. I feel a lot better without any added salt in my diet. I think the K:Na ratio in meat (roughly 4:1) is as low as it should go.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 24, 2011
at 08:01 PM

I too get it from too much calcium in relation to magnesium, but I have triggers outside of that.

0
2763c992f2faee803eddcfd0b69f5141

on February 02, 2012
at 02:07 AM

Lots of good information in your posting, I would like to tweet your blog post so I can visit again in the near future.

0
4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on October 24, 2011
at 07:44 PM

I used to experience those "heart skips a beat" moments all the time when my diet was junk. I never knew what caused them (other than the thought that it was a symptom of slowly killing myself with food).

I had one the other day and realized it was the first time it had happened in a long time. Not-so-coincidentally I had just broken down and ate some junk food, and now I can figure the connection was probably the msg. Good to know. Thanks for the info. Sorry I can't offer an answer to your question.

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