2

votes

Type 2 Diabetes After Three years of Statins?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 07, 2012 at 3:52 PM

I just finished reading about statins causing Type 2 diabetes.I think it is very interesting that I was on a statin before I had a heart attack, and then I was put on more statins for two years after the heart attack. Over the last two years, one of the most common questions asked by medical staff was about a history of diabetes. Five months ago I found out I have Type 2 diabetes which prompted me to research diets and I found Paleo! I started the Paleo diet. I felt great,lost weight, and kept my sugars controlled much to the amazement of the dietitian who recommends healthy whole grains and wants me to increase my carb intake. So is this a chicken and egg question.

691e7096ed20fa1c62810068383bc28a

(95)

on November 12, 2012
at 09:07 PM

I did go off the statins for two months. My blood work came back with LDL of 4.17 and my cardiologist was furious. I am now back on the statins. I have not yet achieved my ideal weight, and I gather until I do, my LDL will be high.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 10, 2012
at 12:30 AM

My N=1 is that high carb diets eaten in excess of daily total caloric needs are not healthy, whole grain or not. My T2 diabetes was caused by overeating white rice, frosted miniwheats and raisin bran (flakes & raisins = double trouble). The "heart healthy" fiber content and vitamins of the two cereals convinced me that eating lots of them would be good for me. Big mistake, now corrected.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 10, 2012
at 12:26 AM

My N=1 is that high carb diets eaten in excess of daily total caloric needs are not heart healthy, whole grain or not. My problems were caused by white rice and raisin bran (flakes & raisins = double trouble).

E253f8ac1d139bf4d0bfb44debd1db21

on November 09, 2012
at 07:48 AM

Are you off the statins now?

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6 Answers

3
Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 09, 2012
at 07:09 PM

My Type 2 was caused by obesity and eating lots of carbs, and was cured by weight loss and drastic carb reduction. I took statins throughout that period. I don't think that they had anything to do with either causing or curing the diabetes.

2
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on November 23, 2012
at 08:57 PM

As far as the correlation to statins, most likely what I suspect is that they didn't recognize that you may have had "pre-diabetes" in the first place. When you were first put on statins, did they check your HbA1C and FBG, or how about insulin levels??? Probably not. They just saw your total cholesterol and probably decided you needed statins, yet the highest correlation to heart attacks and strokes is HYPERGLYCEMIA, a far better predictor than total cholesterol or LDL-C levels. However, this is not checked by most physicians unless you present with other blaringly obvious risk factors for diabetes.

And as far as preventing heart attacks, looks like the statin didn't do a very good job there.

1
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on November 09, 2012
at 08:00 PM

Studies are showing an increase in diabetes with statin therapy, but it's not the only cause of diabetes. "Heart healthy" high carb, whole grain diets are also a contributing factor.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 10, 2012
at 12:30 AM

My N=1 is that high carb diets eaten in excess of daily total caloric needs are not healthy, whole grain or not. My T2 diabetes was caused by overeating white rice, frosted miniwheats and raisin bran (flakes & raisins = double trouble). The "heart healthy" fiber content and vitamins of the two cereals convinced me that eating lots of them would be good for me. Big mistake, now corrected.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 10, 2012
at 12:26 AM

My N=1 is that high carb diets eaten in excess of daily total caloric needs are not heart healthy, whole grain or not. My problems were caused by white rice and raisin bran (flakes & raisins = double trouble).

0
D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on November 24, 2012
at 07:17 AM

Statins have been implicated in causing diabetes. But at fairly high doses and for stronger statins like Crestor and Lipitor. This is one of those longer-term side effects of statins which did not come to fore when doing short-term clinical trials. Only muscle and liver damage were documented as side effects of taking statins short-term.

Then came anecdotal accounts of memory lapses and the increased incidence of T2 diabetes. These came after patients had been on statins for umpteen years. Ever wonder why Big Pharma, when doing its own trials, often cuts them short than originally planned? Lock in your gain. Shield the drug from longer-term side effects.

According to the NYT, "The cause and effect was unequivocal because the multiple large trials of the more potent statins had a consistent excess of diabetes."

0
10f6f47a7cfd16e24b9ba5d6bb44ec64

on November 09, 2012
at 07:02 PM

Statins are terrible for everyone!!!! If I were you, I would get offf of them ASAP. You don't need yourgood cholesterol lowered with a statin!

0
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on November 07, 2012
at 04:15 PM

It is a chicken and egg question. I don't think it has been proven that statins cause diabetes, though I may be mistaken. It is my guess that there are likely studies suggesting a positive correlation between statins and diabetes, and this would be suspected. THere are also likely studies suggesting a positive correlations between statins and incidence of heart attacks.

THe facts of the matter explaining such findings are that people on statins are not in good health to begin with, and merely taking statins does not preclude one's health from deteriorating further. The key is to remember that correlation is not causation, and that there are potentially many confounding factors that would implicate negative complications from statin use. Here's a similar story: There is an inverse association between socio-economic status and diabetes incidence. However, being of a lower income does not cause diabetes. People of lower incomes also consume more soda-pop and exercise less (to name just two of the confounds).

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