7

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Salivary amylase - does this explain 'carb people'

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 27, 2012 at 7:08 AM

We all know some people can tolerate carbs better than others. Is salivary amylase the dominant factor in that?

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/142/5/853.short

Plasma insulin concentrations in the High Amylose group were significantly higher than baseline early in the testing session, whereas insulin concentrations in the Low Amylose group did not increase at this time. Following ingestion of the glucose solution, however, blood glucose and insulin concentrations did not differ between the groups. These observations are interpreted to suggest that HA individuals may be better adapted to ingest starches, whereas LA individuals may be at greater risk for insulin resistance and diabetes if chronically ingesting starch-rich diets.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on June 28, 2012
at 12:24 AM

that's your => causation? If you have more salivary amylase then you'd be breaking down starch into glucose sooner and more substantially, which would strike me as likely to increase the insulin response and potentially cause problems. I mean, they say that the HA group reacted to starch as if it were sugar. Which do you think is actually the healthier position to be in?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 27, 2012
at 03:07 PM

well the fact that some people make more than others would show who can tolerate more carbs

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 27, 2012
at 03:07 PM

yeah I know that, some people make more of it than others though

Medium avatar

(10601)

on June 27, 2012
at 12:36 PM

The word root amyl- connects to the early wheat strain emmer. So amylases are expected to process wheat.

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4 Answers

1
Ce2968ab71119c736ba9d83841c5718a

on September 13, 2012
at 04:40 PM

I think it could. Contrary to the popular belief in the paleo community human evolution did not stop 10,000 years ago. Although I do think that there is a strong case to be made that newer adaptations have not yet globalized.

The best example is lactose tolerance. This adaptation has evolved fairly recently. lactase intolerance ranges from 5% in northern Europe through 71% for Sicily to more than 90% in some African and Asian countries.

In other words, not all human populations are equal.

On the side of common paleo wisdom, recommending only foods that ALL humans have evolved to eat, is a good plan. I for one still eat dairy, as per the above.

Here are some relevant links: A full lecture on human evoulton including the lactose tolerance http://media.hhmi.org/hl/11Lect2.html

A nice demo of how lactose tolerance evolution worked http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/media/lactose_tolerance_selection-sm.wmv

0
E753cf7753e7be889ca68b1a4203483f

on September 23, 2012
at 11:07 PM

Insulin resistance isn't caused by inability to digest starches. Best explanation so far involves cellular energy excess as primary cause.

0
0a0afca93a127c82ec4192a2e99647f4

on June 27, 2012
at 12:22 PM

It seems to me that if a population was in an area with a fair amount of starch available for gathering (This enzyme is really more about breaking down starch than carbs in general) that, over time, natural-selection would increase their amylose producing machinery. So yes, I think folks with higher amounts of it are likely more adapted to high-starch intake.

0
Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

on June 27, 2012
at 11:37 AM

I wouldn't be surprised by a correlation, but I don't see how it would really explain anything, in fact I'd be tempted to think it ought to be the other way round.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on June 28, 2012
at 12:24 AM

that's your => causation? If you have more salivary amylase then you'd be breaking down starch into glucose sooner and more substantially, which would strike me as likely to increase the insulin response and potentially cause problems. I mean, they say that the HA group reacted to starch as if it were sugar. Which do you think is actually the healthier position to be in?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 27, 2012
at 03:07 PM

well the fact that some people make more than others would show who can tolerate more carbs

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