4

votes

Lowest glycemic ways to get glucose

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 05, 2012 at 2:20 AM

PHD recommends 200 - 600 calories of glucose (ie starches) a day. What's the lowest glycemic way to get these calories? I see mixed results on carrots. Zucchini looks safe. Unclear on Jicama. What else?

Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on January 06, 2012
at 06:01 PM

Yes I agree. I've cut down on the sweet potatoes + butter. Plain has been pretty delicious too!

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on January 06, 2012
at 05:46 PM

HMMM i could live off that menu but i gotta admit its prolly TO ME the most rewarding set of foods

3a567c1637db69f1455ce35e78201a2c

(1054)

on January 05, 2012
at 04:25 PM

Haven't seen any patient of Rosedale who think he is a quack...but I suspose there are some. Only clinicians who rely on RCTs and are conventional wisdom and who are incapable of keeping up with current literature of the last 6 months, view him as a quack.

7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on January 05, 2012
at 02:40 PM

I will just point out that other clinicians think Rosedale is a quack. Without some science you don’t really know which clinician to choose from (be him an MD, chiropractor, homeopath, shaman, or faith healer.) Their observations are just random data.

7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on January 05, 2012
at 02:19 PM

You can make just about anything lower glycemic by adding protein, fat, and/or fiber. Glycemic measures are kind of pointless unless you are diabetic.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 05, 2012
at 11:51 AM

I like celeriac at the moment. It's my staple. Celeriac fries are awesome.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 05, 2012
at 11:45 AM

What is PHD? ...

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5 Answers

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3
Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on January 05, 2012
at 07:45 AM

Cold Okinawan purple sweet potatoes + cinnamon + butter, or coconut butter (coconut cream). Awesome.

Winter Squash is also pretty good. Brussell sprouts, broccoli? A couple of cups of those can get some good glucose in. Saute in lard!

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on January 06, 2012
at 05:46 PM

HMMM i could live off that menu but i gotta admit its prolly TO ME the most rewarding set of foods

Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on January 06, 2012
at 06:01 PM

Yes I agree. I've cut down on the sweet potatoes + butter. Plain has been pretty delicious too!

3
Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on January 05, 2012
at 11:42 AM

glycemic index is not very useful in predicating whether a carb source is healthy or not. a sweet potato or white potato can have a high GI yet be very healthy for you while ice cream can have a low GI. just eat a moderate amount of plain cooked tubers at your meals (potato, s potato, yam, taro, yuca etc). i don't recommend mixing butter/sugar/cinnamon etc with tubers because it'll make them extremely rewarding (they're already high carb) and very easy to overeat/trigger cravings. however, eating them plainly baked/cooked has little risk of overeating

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 05, 2012
at 03:48 AM

Cooked potatoes that have been chilled in the refrigerator overnight. Top with a splash of vinegar and seasonings and a tablespoon of yogurt...very low glycemic response.

2
3a567c1637db69f1455ce35e78201a2c

(1054)

on January 05, 2012
at 03:17 AM

The absolute most primal way to get glucose to operate your body along with your brain is to eat animal protein. Animal protein converts to glucose in enough quantity to feed the brain and muscles and tissues.

People who eat ketogenic diets have slightly higher fasting blood glucose reading because the body is constantly using Gluconeogenesis to make glucose when carbs are not available.

Yams, Sweetpotatoes, turnips, parsnips are all low glycemic.

Dr Ron Rosedale says there are really no safe starches in direct rebuttal to the assertions of Paul Jaminet. I will always take a climician's observations over a researcher who seems to rely on RCTs for validation.

See Jimmy Moore's "There are no safe Starches posting. http://livinlavidalowcarb.com/blog/is-there-any-such-thing-as-safe-starches-on-a-low-carb-diet/11809

3a567c1637db69f1455ce35e78201a2c

(1054)

on January 05, 2012
at 04:25 PM

Haven't seen any patient of Rosedale who think he is a quack...but I suspose there are some. Only clinicians who rely on RCTs and are conventional wisdom and who are incapable of keeping up with current literature of the last 6 months, view him as a quack.

7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on January 05, 2012
at 02:40 PM

I will just point out that other clinicians think Rosedale is a quack. Without some science you don’t really know which clinician to choose from (be him an MD, chiropractor, homeopath, shaman, or faith healer.) Their observations are just random data.

1
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on January 05, 2012
at 01:38 PM

I'm with DH. If you have a reasonably normal ability to metabolize glucose and you're eating paleo foods or PHD safe starches like rice (as opposed to sugar bombs like many SAD foods), you probably don't need to worry about glycemic index.

But Paul Jaminet provides some useful tips for minimizing the impact of starches on blood sugar levels like eat starches with meals that contain fats and an acid like vinegar or lemon juice.

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