5

votes

Is it lots of fat- sans carbs and starch? Or carbs and starch-sans fat? (for weight-control).

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 17, 2012 at 12:27 AM

If you fuel your body with a lot of fat, say a stick of butter, or a half cup of coconut oil per day, then throw a sweet potato and rice on top of that, doesn't your body burn the potato and rice first, storing the fat? So, if you choose the sweet potato or rice, should you limit additional fat? Eating high fat and any amount of starch has resulted in instant weight-gain for many a primal-eating person. Which is it?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 17, 2012
at 01:20 AM

I don't really have a set schedule. I just wing it each day depending on how I'm feeling/looking and what my workout is/was. Eating carbs after a workout makes me feel really good, so I like to include a Japanese sweet potato and some berries in my post workout meal. My apartment is literally a couple blocks from WF, and I typically stop in there all sweaty and gross and grab lunch/dinner materials on my way back from the gym. If it was a particularly demanding workout, I'll choose a larger JSP, and if it was an easier workout, I'll grab a smaller one.

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on August 17, 2012
at 01:06 AM

Do you alternate between starch/carb up weeks with low-fat, and higher fat/protein/lower starch-carb weeks?

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on August 17, 2012
at 12:31 AM

Also, is it protein and veg, sans additional fat and starch?

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5 Answers

6
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on August 17, 2012
at 12:57 AM

If you are choosing sweet potato or rice, then yes you should limit the amount of fat otherwise you'll eat too many calories. You can't be simultaneously "high starch and high fat" or else you'll just end up overeating on cals. You can be high carb, and moderate/low fat, moderate/low protein OR high fat, moderate/low carb, moderate/low protein OR high protein, moderate/low carb, moderate/low fat.

It's like saying you can pick three numbers between 1 and 10, where the sum total of the numbers must be <= 10. You can't pick three high numbers because you'll overshoot, and hit say 22. But you can choose combos like two low and one high or three medium or two very low and one very high, etc. For instance 1+3+6 or 2+2+6 or 4+3+3, etc.

If you go with more than 1 high, your other macros have to medium to low in order to not gain weight from overshooting calories.

Personally, I like higher protein, and the remainder roughly even between carbs and fat for when trying to lean up, otherwise I don't even bother keeping track and just eat the combos that are most satisfying. Typically I eat the majority of carbs in my first post workout meal. Eating carbs according to activity level seems to work best.

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on August 17, 2012
at 01:06 AM

Do you alternate between starch/carb up weeks with low-fat, and higher fat/protein/lower starch-carb weeks?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on August 17, 2012
at 01:20 AM

I don't really have a set schedule. I just wing it each day depending on how I'm feeling/looking and what my workout is/was. Eating carbs after a workout makes me feel really good, so I like to include a Japanese sweet potato and some berries in my post workout meal. My apartment is literally a couple blocks from WF, and I typically stop in there all sweaty and gross and grab lunch/dinner materials on my way back from the gym. If it was a particularly demanding workout, I'll choose a larger JSP, and if it was an easier workout, I'll grab a smaller one.

4
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on August 17, 2012
at 12:50 AM

Eat protein and fat for health and to sustain life. Eat carbs to the level that you can tolerate for your age and activity level. Least that is how I see it. I'm not concerned with weight though. I'm concerned with the metabolic processes that may or may not involve weight.

1
3ab5e1b9eba22a071f653330b7fc9579

on August 17, 2012
at 11:27 AM

It isnt quite as simple as that, there are other factors you have to consider, like refilling glycogen after a workout and caloric needs. I eat high-fat and enjoy eating sweet potatos, bananas, and even white potatos and the occasional sushi roll without gaining weight. If you want to add the starchy foods in but are concerned about weight gain, eat them on a hard training day. Your body will burn through them pretty quick.

1
Ef26f888ed248de197c37a4cb04ef4a7

on August 17, 2012
at 09:33 AM

It doesn't matter as long as you stay within your caloric needs. The problems with high fat high carb/sugar is that it's by default low protein and generally really palatable therefore easy to overeat. Foods like biscuits, chips, cakes, pastries are high fat-high sugar-low protein and are easy to over consume.

0
Fdf101349c397fbe1ecb98b310fb3737

(358)

on August 17, 2012
at 02:27 PM

Your initial question did not really say high fat and high carb. It was more like high fat with some carbs thrown in (I am assuming you get adequate protein as well). I am also assuming a reasonably healthy sugar metabolism.

Immediately after eating (post-prandial) in general, your body will metabolize as much of the sugar as it can. It will burn what it can, store some in the muscles and liver as glycogen, and in some cases it can convert excess sugars to fats (this is believed to not normally be a significant pathway). Because the sugar has a tendency to increase insulin, the fat in the meal will go into fat cells while the body disposes of the excess sugar.

Once your body reaches a normal blood sugar level, your insulin goes down and you are again able to use the fat that had previously been stored. There's no magical weight gain or loss associated with eating carbs and fats together, as long as you do not go far above your calorie needs.

People who do gain weight from eating a high starch load, might have been a little low on glycogen to start with. So sometimes, the act of refilling glycogen stores can put on some water weight. Typically around 5 lbss of water weight swing can occur from going low carb vs high carb.

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