2

votes

Do you season your eggs?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 22, 2011 at 7:32 PM

Lately, my family has found ourselves going through a lot of eggs. About 3doz/wk. We generally eat all of them Hard Boiled. After dealing with difficulties peeling, we discovered, the fresher the egg the harder to peel.

So, we have started "seasoning" eggs. We will usually buy 4doz and leave them in the fridge for about a week, while we are going through the previous weeks eggs. This "seasoning" makes eggs a lot easier to peel.

I just thought it was weird that I have become so much of an egghead, that I must now have a backstock of eggs, which are maturing until they reach a proper cooking state.

Does any one else do this???

On a side note, what do you eat your Hard Boiled Eggs with?

For me its Sriracha, nothing else pairs as well with a creamy yolk.

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on December 23, 2011
at 12:49 PM

I "age" them too, but by leaving them out at room temperature for a day or two. It's absolutely necessary when you have your own chickens and the eggs were just laid yesterday. Boil a truly *fresh* egg and you'll be picking bits of shell off it for an hour. I suspect that most of the tricks like putting them in an ice bath "work" as often as they do because eggs from the store may be weeks old already when bought. Eggs keep so well that refrigerating them isn't necessary for safety; it just allows them to keep for months instead of weeks.

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on December 23, 2011
at 12:41 PM

Up-voted for actual science.

F074daf8ee19a4c101c533b7fdab708a

(284)

on December 23, 2011
at 06:15 AM

Seriously, has anyone looked at this? It shows you how to blow the shell off your eggs! Looks like great fun to me.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on December 23, 2011
at 01:02 AM

Peeling hack: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2008/07/02/how-to-peel-hard-boiled-eggs-without-peeling/

83d6a06c93bb3490dbca339cbbb63385

(526)

on December 22, 2011
at 11:43 PM

I do this all the time, but not on purpose.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on December 22, 2011
at 11:22 PM

That's some crazy egg voodoo right there with the avocado/cayenne/bacon mix. Must try!

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on December 22, 2011
at 09:50 PM

that sounds good, the avocado deviled egg version. I'm going to try it!

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12 Answers

best answer

3
7b7ebe08c25d5a911f9c15c5e50092b9

(337)

on December 22, 2011
at 09:58 PM

My fifth grade science experiment was on the "peelability of hard-boiled eggs"! I tried all possible combinations of:

Cooking method:

  1. Boil for a certain amount of time.
  2. Bring to a boil and let sit for a certain amount of time.

Cooling method:

  1. Let them cool to room temperature.
  2. Use an ice bath to cool them quickly.

Egg freshness (before cooking):

  1. Eggs fresh from the fridge.
  2. Eggs that had sat out of the fridge for a day.
  3. Eggs that had sat out of the fridge for 2 days.

Neither the cooking nor cooling method made any difference (though the ice bath does prevent the yolks from turning green). What did make a big difference was how fresh the eggs were. The fresher the eggs, the harder they were to peel. After two days on the counter, the shells came right off. If you're worried about leaving your eggs at room temperature for a day or two, you can always leave them in the fridge for a week or two as the OP suggests.

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on December 23, 2011
at 12:41 PM

Up-voted for actual science.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on December 23, 2011
at 01:02 AM

Peeling hack: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2008/07/02/how-to-peel-hard-boiled-eggs-without-peeling/

4
Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on December 22, 2011
at 08:03 PM

As egg quality deterioration occurs, the albumen (the white part of the egg) begins to thin out, which allows the yolk/embryo to "approach" the shell. You can hold a candlelight, or light source to a fresh egg, versus an old, expired egg. The yolk would be easier to see in the old, expired egg, due to the thinning of the albumen. The thinning of the albumen is normal "development" of the egg, as its alkalinity increases. As thinning occurs, the strength of the membranes within the egg are also weaker, which may account for easier peeling for non-fresh eggs.

I find that regardless of freshness, if I dunk my eggs in ice water straight from post-boil, and leave them for about 10 minutes, they peel very well, since the cold-shock will allow the egg inside to shrink away from the shell.

Favorite way to eat hard-boiled eggs: Split in half, mix yolk with creamy avocado. Touch of salt, pepper, and cayenne pepper. Scoop into halved whites, top with crispy bacon, and go.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on December 22, 2011
at 09:50 PM

that sounds good, the avocado deviled egg version. I'm going to try it!

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on December 22, 2011
at 11:22 PM

That's some crazy egg voodoo right there with the avocado/cayenne/bacon mix. Must try!

1
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on December 22, 2011
at 07:39 PM

Same experience here. To peel well,have to be slightly aged. We keep chickens. I just throw some Himalayan salt on the hard boiled eggs. Actually they are nice in combination with other foods as well. I will have to get braver and do that. (Sometimes in salads)

0
164ed7cd8d84c926bc66f366619bf853

(495)

on December 23, 2011
at 02:37 AM

If you add salt to the water, it will help the egg peel much easier - fresh or not. Been doing it for years...

0
F074daf8ee19a4c101c533b7fdab708a

(284)

on December 22, 2011
at 10:29 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PN2gYHJNT3Y About to try this for 16 eggs boiled for green devils!

F074daf8ee19a4c101c533b7fdab708a

(284)

on December 23, 2011
at 06:15 AM

Seriously, has anyone looked at this? It shows you how to blow the shell off your eggs! Looks like great fun to me.

0
79085325969c93fe85d45433424c806f

on December 22, 2011
at 08:37 PM

Unlike others who have commented, I find my eggs peel better when they are warm, so I peel what I need right after hard-boiling. Also, if I have to use some that were stored in the fridge for a while, I always warm them up in a bowl of hot water for a few minutes and then peel. Perfect!

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on December 22, 2011
at 08:28 PM

I eat them hardboiled, straight and as fresh as possible. I also place them in cold water for 10 minutes after cooking. However they are often hard to peel. My eggs are very fresh.

0
Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

on December 22, 2011
at 07:47 PM

the fresh laid ones i fry, the store bought ones are pre-seasoned

0
244e1f82efb3fd15d2da39397488fb24

(549)

on December 22, 2011
at 07:44 PM

OMG YES. DEAR GOD, YES.

Salsa. Just salsa. And maybe some cheese if I'm feeling up to it. Oh my god. It is a beautiful thing.

0
Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on December 22, 2011
at 07:42 PM

Are you sure it's not how you're boiling the egg, rather than the egg's age? Maybe you're boiling it too long/short?

I use an egg steamer for making hard-boiled eggs, so the cooking time is pretty consistent. I've done this with newly bought eggs, as well as with eggs that have been in the fridge for a week or two, and there's no noticeable difference in how difficult it is to peel the egg.

As far as condiments, I used to use salt and pepper, but usually don't use anything anymore. I use sriracha from time to time on other foods, but have used it less because it contains sugar (which I find unnecessary).

0
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 22, 2011
at 07:39 PM

Yeah, when I eat eggs, I buy a bunch so I have some that are old enough for easy peeling.

I love making egg salad with olive oil, salt, pepper, and whatever herbs I have on hand.

0
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 22, 2011
at 07:38 PM

Yeah, I nearly always season my eggs, but it's somewhat accidental. I was quite poor as a child and went hungry at times so I always have 2-3 dozen eggs in the fridge (along with at least one backup unit of all other foods/supplies.) By the time I open a dozen, they've been in the fridge for a while.

I also "season" my eggs. My 3 favorites:

  • salsa
  • turmeric
  • black pepper

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