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Sprinting and a 5k

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 25, 2013 at 2:04 AM

I hate running long distance but will have to do a 5k soon. Is it possible to ONLY do a sprinting routine an then by 5k day be able to jog a 5k?

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on February 26, 2013
at 02:32 AM

By "run", I mean run continuously without stopping, no walking, no breaks. I could probably run/walk 29 miles but that is not what I am talking about. If the OP was talking about run/walking then I agree, anyone but the most potato of couch potatoes should be able to manage that.

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on February 25, 2013
at 07:20 PM

Exactly. Go out for a jog. See if you can last 30 minutes at a nice easy pace. If so, you just did a 5K. Also, it's not "chronic cardio" to do a 30 min jog twice a week until race day so that you can put in a good performance, if you care about that. It's good to mix it up. Just don't make jogging a habit! (Especially if you care about your knees.)

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 25, 2013
at 05:42 PM

3 KM is not very far at all. I'd imagine almost anyone (lest those with medical conditions or sever obesity) could run/walk 3 KM. Most people could start with 3 x jog 500m walk 500m . Jog 500m walk 500m jog 1000m, walk 500m jog 500m. Then jog 1000m, walk 500m, jog 1000m, walk 500m. then increase the jogs and decrease the walks until you get to jogging 3000m. This would likely take max 2-3 weeks even for someone who has never run before.

59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on February 25, 2013
at 01:12 PM

What you want to do is run as slow as humanly possible for the first 2/3 of the run.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 25, 2013
at 12:58 PM

Agreed, it's not a sprint race. The folks I hang around with are triathletes, marathoners and ultra-marathoners... 5K is their warmup. Their craziness is starting to taint my view a bit.

C68f0b374156e5ce7a9b8358232bfed0

(637)

on February 25, 2013
at 08:45 AM

+1 for the inclusion of different people and their ability to run! Although not sure about running 3k every other day to start. UncleLongHair - how soon is soon?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 25, 2013
at 03:14 AM

not to split hairs -- but technically anything over the mile/1500 is considered long distance. a 5K is definitely long distance, however, it is not "chronic cardio" especially if you mix it up with some sprints and fartleks.

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10 Answers

1
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on February 25, 2013
at 10:23 PM

I do a 10k once a year with absolutely no training other than my normal strength-based-crossfitesque work. I even get better times now (sub 50) than I did when I actually trained the chronic cardio way. A 5k is going to be no more than a half hour. You can do anything for a half hour. If you feel good, move faster, if you feel bad slow down. Running isn't very technical.

1
C68f0b374156e5ce7a9b8358232bfed0

on February 25, 2013
at 08:58 AM

HAve you tried running it already? You might actually already be able to do it! If not then go out and attempt a 5k and see how far off it you are or what your overall time is to complete 5k. There's no harm in not running the 5k continuously, take breaks if you have to. I used to love to run but it didn't love me. I kept getting injured no matter what plans I followed. Nevertheless I completed 5ks, 10ks and a half marathon. My first 5k I was a nervous wreck thinking I didn't know how on earth I was going to run it and what a spoon I am going to look doing it. No one cared. I did it but oh so slowly and no one batted an eyelid. People had many ways to do it. People like me were the proverbial toroise: slow and steady; some were much faster but steady and others actually did it in portions. They ran then walked, ran then walked. Which makes me want to suggest why not attempt that? Why not break up your 5k into sprints and do Tabata style running? It'd be a great sprint workout! :)

See how far you get in your practice 5k and then you'll know how much you have to work on (though bear in mind that whatever you do in your training you'll exceed in race conditions). It all depends on how much time you have to prepare but for training don't do too much the week of it, prepare beforehand. In the few weeks before it, do some sprint work which suits you but also a steady run, a fartlek (speed play where you run and change tempo on how you feel) and a slow jog where you jog the furthest you have jogged before but much slower. It is the slow jog where you help develop the muscles for endurance and not the speed.

If you have some base level of fitness you can be rest assured you won't be the last one across the finish line if that's what you're worried about. Just stick to a pace that is comfortable to you and hit it. Remember, it's the taking part that counts!!

Good luck!

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on February 25, 2013
at 07:20 PM

Exactly. Go out for a jog. See if you can last 30 minutes at a nice easy pace. If so, you just did a 5K. Also, it's not "chronic cardio" to do a 30 min jog twice a week until race day so that you can put in a good performance, if you care about that. It's good to mix it up. Just don't make jogging a habit! (Especially if you care about your knees.)

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 25, 2013
at 02:58 AM

All depends on what time you want. And 5K is not long distance...

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 25, 2013
at 03:14 AM

not to split hairs -- but technically anything over the mile/1500 is considered long distance. a 5K is definitely long distance, however, it is not "chronic cardio" especially if you mix it up with some sprints and fartleks.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 25, 2013
at 12:58 PM

Agreed, it's not a sprint race. The folks I hang around with are triathletes, marathoners and ultra-marathoners... 5K is their warmup. Their craziness is starting to taint my view a bit.

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on February 25, 2013
at 02:51 AM

I don't like to run and am not good at it. I am reasonably fit, I have been doing crossfit 3-4x per week for about 9 months and generally am in the upper 25-50% of each class in terms of time and performance.

However, I can't just hop up and run a 5k at any kind of reasonable pace without specifically training for it. Lots of people can, but not me. For a lot of people, running a few miles doesn't seem any more difficult than walking around the block. I have a friend that ran a half marathon and didn't think it was really a big deal. But I definitely have trouble with a 5k.

If you are going to do a 5k, or do them on the regular, then I would work up to it by first doing 2-3k every other day for a week then work up to a 5k. I agree with other posters that most people can force themselves to run a 5k even with little or no training, but it might be painful or injurious. But there is no shame in working up to it IMHO.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 25, 2013
at 05:42 PM

3 KM is not very far at all. I'd imagine almost anyone (lest those with medical conditions or sever obesity) could run/walk 3 KM. Most people could start with 3 x jog 500m walk 500m . Jog 500m walk 500m jog 1000m, walk 500m jog 500m. Then jog 1000m, walk 500m, jog 1000m, walk 500m. then increase the jogs and decrease the walks until you get to jogging 3000m. This would likely take max 2-3 weeks even for someone who has never run before.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on February 26, 2013
at 02:32 AM

By "run", I mean run continuously without stopping, no walking, no breaks. I could probably run/walk 29 miles but that is not what I am talking about. If the OP was talking about run/walking then I agree, anyone but the most potato of couch potatoes should be able to manage that.

C68f0b374156e5ce7a9b8358232bfed0

(637)

on February 25, 2013
at 08:45 AM

+1 for the inclusion of different people and their ability to run! Although not sure about running 3k every other day to start. UncleLongHair - how soon is soon?

0
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on February 26, 2013
at 02:19 AM

I think it depends. How much sprinting are you doing? (How long is your workout?) If you're doing intervals for 20 minutes, then you'll probably do a 5k okay. On the other hand, if you are running a few hills or a few 100s, then you may want to go out and run a bit more.

A 5k, while not a sprint, isn't really all that far. If you are not confident in your ability to finish a 5k running the entire time, then you may want to look into doing some kind of run/walk program (e.g. couch to 5k), or simply starting out by doing a run/walk 5k a few times a week, gradually increasing your running component. For instance, run 1 min/walk 1 min, gradually progressing to run 2-3 min/walk 30 sec (etc.). If you're planning on trying to go fast, do it faster, or add a couple of runs a week in addition to your sprint workouts.

0
753e1b824fbe0b11c797a244b1a4c7e3

on February 25, 2013
at 07:38 PM

I would check out Couch to 5k plan if I were you-- it's not too instensive or time consuming, and is a good way to build up to it.

Could you out of nowhere just run a 5K? Maybe, depends on a lot of factors!

However, this brings me back to my track and cross country days--I remember NOT trying to train and build up before jumping into the season and winding up with shin splints once the season began... from the perspective of injury prevention, I definitely recommended something like Couch to 5k. An injury could end up preventing you from doing the exercise you actually enjoy!

0
9712e4ce885436e557751cfa6ffedd5a

(488)

on February 25, 2013
at 12:12 PM

Sprinting is glycolitic, long distance running much less so.

You need to train your slow twitch muscles in order to hope to do moderately well at a 5k.

Could You run a 5k with just sprinting training? Sure, but not well.

And what's the point of running in a race if you don't try to do well?

0
42b521ef768a229136f3debd8cdbe682

on February 25, 2013
at 06:16 AM

Thanks for the input. The 5k isn't for time per se. I just have friends that do them for fun and I wanted to join in. Just wondering how much actual 5k training I would have to do. From the sound of it is based on the individual.

59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on February 25, 2013
at 01:12 PM

What you want to do is run as slow as humanly possible for the first 2/3 of the run.

0
39311794c054f89a226f33e1afd08721

on February 25, 2013
at 02:41 AM

When I was younger, I could take off on a 5K jog even if I hadn't worked out in a long time. It's a distance a human being is well designed for and only requires someone who's reasonably healthy.

When I would have those fast-twitch muscles developed well, I think it did slow me down a tad for a distance run. My stride was terrible for running no matter the distance, but my stride was really bad and it was hard to control my pacing and there was a little something not right for it about my muscles when I'd been doing those explosive work-outs.

If you need to make decent time, you should be able to shake out the biggest flaws in your pacing with just a couple practice 5K's. You probably wouldn't make your best time without conditioning your muscles for a longer run, but your time won't be terrible as long as you're in reasonably good shape.

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 25, 2013
at 02:18 AM

Is it possible? Sure. A 5K is only like 16-24 minutes. You can certainly jog that long if you ware sprinting three times a week.

The question is, What is your goal. If you want to PR and you want to focus on sprinting (which is similar to my style), I would do something along the lines of this:

http://running.competitor.com/files/2011/06/Mile-Page-1.pdf

http://running.competitor.com/files/2011/06/Mile-Page-2.pdf

I modified it a bit to make the Sundays the same as Thursdays (although I will stretch to 45 minutes if I am feeling good). I lift Mondays and Fridays and take Wednesday off lest a 10 minute bike and some stretching.

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