1

votes

How about soy based clothing?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 08, 2012 at 1:31 PM

Hey ya'll,

I'm looking at sustainable/eco-friendly clothing options. Ideally, I want to do a purge of all my useless stuff, give it away to the Salvation Army, and then slowly accumulate higher quality, comfier, better wicking clothing, that's preferably made sweatshop-free. It's not entirely impossible.

On Etsy, and certain clothing shops online, I'm seeing hemp/organic cotton/soy blends. Soy clothing? Srsly?

How healthy is soy clothing? It may sound stupid, but is wearing soy clothing a possible health hazard? I would imagine no, if it's organic.

Thanks :)

74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

(1663)

on December 10, 2012
at 12:17 PM

I like what I've read about merino wool. But holy moley, is it ever expensive! I'm a sucker for layering, and I think I have more long sleeved shirts than any other type of clothing, LOL! Okay, except for maybe t shirts and hoodies. Oh, the hoodies... I'd still like a couple of cents on whether or not soy based clothing is safe for wearing.

  • 74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

    asked by

    (1663)
  • Views
    2.4K
  • Last Activity
    1410D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

2
489497642ad41d4b45db4d07dbe54353

(978)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

Soy is an industrial monocrop. It is one of the plants that they destroyed the prairie to grow. Even organic is intensive and requires a lot of soil disruption. These types of crops remove topsoil, they don't build it.

My favorite materials are wool, linen and hemp. One nice thing about wool is that it does not seem to trap oders as much, so it does not need to be washed as much. Cutting down on the water, the fuel to heat the water, the electricity to run the machine and the soap used, makes for eco friendly clothing for its whole lifetime, not just at point of purchase. That said I have a lot of cotton, it is just easier to find.

The most environmental choice is used clothing, and any of the chemicals used in processing will hopefully have already off-gassed or been washed away.

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 22, 2012
at 04:06 PM

By purchasing this garbage you are voting with your dollars to support an evil industry that destroys land, produces GMOs, sues farmers when their "product" does what it naturally does and grows on the wrong piece of land, are supporting the destruction of many more animals, and the use of tons of pesticides.

In other words, you're being fooled by words such as "eco friendly" and "sustainable" which have been perverted so that you can be fooled into buying them. And this is at the cost of truly sustainable fibers/fabrics that are actually environmentally friendly and don't require tons of pesticides, nor destroying the lives of what few family farm owners are still left.

1
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on December 08, 2012
at 02:15 PM

IMO, merino wool is a more sustainable option. Wool clothing lasts a LOT longer than cotton, bamboo or soy and comes in many weights--I wear it year-round. Check out Icebreaker, Ibex and of course Smartwool. Patagonia has some, too.

74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

(1663)

on December 10, 2012
at 12:17 PM

I like what I've read about merino wool. But holy moley, is it ever expensive! I'm a sucker for layering, and I think I have more long sleeved shirts than any other type of clothing, LOL! Okay, except for maybe t shirts and hoodies. Oh, the hoodies... I'd still like a couple of cents on whether or not soy based clothing is safe for wearing.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!