1

votes

is there an addictive quality to HFCS besides just sugar content?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 11, 2013 at 10:54 PM

I'm wondering because we switched my father-in-laws soda from regular coke to an organic 'real sugar' version of soda and he's drinking allot less... Like, from 12 a week to about 8 a week, with no nagging from us. It's also caffeine free, mmaybe that's it?

Medium avatar

(1097)

on August 14, 2013
at 02:38 AM

The astrummortis name is from my phone, PH won't let me sign in on it for some reason. Anyway, there's actually 9 grams more sugar in the things, LOL. No winning there.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 12, 2013
at 05:32 PM

Congratulations, you have an opinion. Come back when you have evidence. In the meantime, feel free to propose why sugar sweetened water seems to carry a taste threshold, a point where it eventually gets so sweet that it's less and less preferable: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/20/1/31.full.pdf How do the metabolic effects of fructose explain that?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 12, 2013
at 10:23 AM

The question wasn't about sweetness, but about whether it is addictive. Both sugar and HFCS are addictive because of the fructose content, not whether it's bonded to glucose, not due to its glucose levels - IMO, the addictive quality of fructose isn't due to it being sweeter, but rather due to its influence on satiety.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 12, 2013
at 01:24 AM

I'll go with the caffeine. For the real sugar soda - how many calories? They might have cut the sugar concentration compared to coke, which would also make it less sweet.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 12, 2013
at 12:21 AM

Where are you taste buds? Mine are in my mouth, not my stomach.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 12, 2013
at 12:15 AM

That doesn't make much difference. We have a very nice enzyme in our saliva called sucrase, that splits glucose and fructose when it hits the acid in our stomachs.

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4 Answers

1
4bd4e2fe6a095663f80c69656936e487

(744)

on August 12, 2013
at 01:15 AM

Yes, it suppresses your sense of feeling satiated.

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 12, 2013
at 12:13 AM

Yes, there is. The manufactures have found that adding it to things like bread makes you eat more.

There's an interesting article here: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-05/cafn-atu051613.php

It sort of makes sense at an evolutionary level. At the end of the summer, when fruit is ripe, we tended to eat more of it, even gorge on it, so we'd fatten up for winter. The mechanism is quite useful for survival.

Remember that table sugar is 50% fructose, so this applies to sugar as well as HFCS. It's not that much more evil. Of course, it comes from GMO corn and all that, and there were cases of mercury contamination in there, but white sugar has its own problems.

1
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 12, 2013
at 12:05 AM

HFCS and sucrose are slightly different because in sucrose the glucose and fructose are bonded together while in HFCS they're rolling solo. Free sugars are generally sweeter than bonded sugars, which is why "invert sugar", which is just sucrose treated with an enzyme to free up the glucose and fructose, is sweeter than regular sucrose.

People often enjoy sweet tastes. It's possible switching to sucrose sweetened sodas may cause someone to drink less because the taste is less sweet and thus less rewarding.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 12, 2013
at 05:32 PM

Congratulations, you have an opinion. Come back when you have evidence. In the meantime, feel free to propose why sugar sweetened water seems to carry a taste threshold, a point where it eventually gets so sweet that it's less and less preferable: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/20/1/31.full.pdf How do the metabolic effects of fructose explain that?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 12, 2013
at 12:21 AM

Where are you taste buds? Mine are in my mouth, not my stomach.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 12, 2013
at 10:23 AM

The question wasn't about sweetness, but about whether it is addictive. Both sugar and HFCS are addictive because of the fructose content, not whether it's bonded to glucose, not due to its glucose levels - IMO, the addictive quality of fructose isn't due to it being sweeter, but rather due to its influence on satiety.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 12, 2013
at 12:15 AM

That doesn't make much difference. We have a very nice enzyme in our saliva called sucrase, that splits glucose and fructose when it hits the acid in our stomachs.

1
C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on August 11, 2013
at 11:52 PM

Probably the caffeine, not the HFCS. Sugar is 50/50 glucose/fructose, whereas HFCS is 45/55 glucose/fructose. Not a big difference metabolically.

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