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Pork Rinds Problem

Commented on December 16, 2013
Created December 08, 2013 at 10:57 PM

Pork rinds aka cracklins have become a weekend "cheat" snack of mine (though they're perfectly paleo, they're still kinda empty from a nutrient-dense standpoint), but I've been having trouble making them homemade because the only way to buy pork skins in my area is to buy them in bulk (15 pounds for $30), which requires freezing, cuz who the hell is gonna spend their day cooking 15 pounds' worth of batches of pork rinds?

*** Quick note: I left the store with them already frozen because the delivery came on a day I was unavailable to pick them up.***

Not only are they increidbly hard to cut/separate into strips from frozen, but I've made 5 batches, & none of them have really even been edible. The only recipes I've found have been for FRESH pork skins instead of frozen, and It's been impossible up til now to find the proper cooking temp & duration to get them to be crispy-yet-fragile.

Any tips?

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on December 16, 2013
at 03:42 AM

Thanks for the follow up post......

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7 Answers

best answer

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9819f58fdfdd481fa5d3b5f83b5f65a6

on December 10, 2013
at 01:40 PM

You should definitely defrost first. And, thinner is always better. Let us know how it turns out.

best answer

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Medium avatar

(238)

on December 10, 2013
at 06:47 PM

Just had my first pork skins the other day, I'm somewhat baffled by the concept - they tasted like eating a spoon of salt. I wonder if homemade is better?

To the point, to get crisp baked food you need to cook from a defrosted and dried state. So defrost and then dry with towels, might want to salt and let sit for a bit then dry the moisture off.

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44346732e08b2ad72648534d333c4ed3

on December 15, 2013
at 08:39 PM

Yesterday, I thawed the skins for about an hour or so, patted them dry, cut into inch-wide strips, then baked at 325 for 30 mins. Transferred to a warm oven for an hour, & that's when I got a bit worried, & thought I'd test a couple (it's hard to tell just by lookin at em what the texture's gonna be). They turned out just about perfect. I left the rest of em in the warm oven for about another hour, testing out more & more a few at a time every 20 minutes. The ones that stayed in the longest began to get quite hard, but still edible, which still makes this batch BY FAR the best one I've made to date.

Thanks for all your guys' advice.

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on December 16, 2013
at 03:42 AM

Thanks for the follow up post......

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A6b7afacdb512b861716bca9e9226ad3

(333)

on December 11, 2013
at 07:07 PM

Re: nutrition, I believe they are high in choline

http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/nutrition/a/choline.htm

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F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on December 11, 2013
at 05:47 AM

@samc supplied you with a good piece of advice

"To the point, to get crisp baked food you need to cook from a defrosted and dried state. So defrost and then dry with towels, might want to salt and let sit for a bit then dry the moisture off."

Frozen or wet meat put into the oven won't crisp or crust.... there are competing processes. The item won't crisp until the moisture on the surface is driven off and if the item is too wet or contains too much moisture it'll probably never crisp up.

I'm guessing most "commercial" pork rinds are deep fired in a pressure frier... frying is faster & time is money.

If you do decide to deep fry, it'll be much safer if there's no surface moisture. Experiment with a few at a time so your oil doesn't boil over.

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44346732e08b2ad72648534d333c4ed3

on December 10, 2013
at 01:34 PM

I haven't been. And technically I'm not frying them. Everything I've read has suggested putting them in the oven at a somewhat low heat (350 or lower) for 1-3 hours, and they're supposesed to kinda "fry" themselves that way in their own fat.

The best batch I've made so far has been at 325 for 45 minutes, then left to "cool" for an hour in another oven that had been baking at 400, but was turned off & still warm. This seemed to allow them to dry out while still slowly cooking a bit more.

I'm going to try defrosting them and perhaps I'll cut them into thinner strips.

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9819f58fdfdd481fa5d3b5f83b5f65a6

on December 10, 2013
at 11:46 AM

Are you defrosting them before frying them?

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