4

votes

anyone else a smoker, or a quitter since paleo

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 11, 2012 at 10:58 PM

I am a heavy smoker. I do plan on quitting as soon as this semester is over. I tried during spring break but once the classes started again the stress and lack of concentration was too much. I have quit for about a year in the past. I am wondering if Paleo by any chance makes quitting easier to those who have gone this route? I remember always wanting to eat when I quit before, but now I am usually too full and don't know if I could shove more food in me to quiet my mouths need for activity.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 12, 2012
at 02:28 PM

I get the weirdest looks when I smoke a cigar. "You're HEALTHY, why are you SMOKING?" Meh. I probably smoke two a year, often in a celebratory fashion, and ... well, they're tasty. :-)

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 12, 2012
at 01:34 PM

Eating better and losimg weight would be helpful for you, but I tend to think quiting smoking is even more important as you are a heavy smoker. Really, you need to do both. Do what you can. I feel your pain.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on April 12, 2012
at 12:40 PM

Having been the girlfriend of someone who quit smoking (i.e. the girl what suddenly got the brunt of someone's oral fixation and was chewed/nibbled/kissed/licked pretty near incessantly for several months) I have to say, please don't go that route.

59d367d77f4082717bade07508624db8

(1198)

on April 12, 2012
at 04:01 AM

I'm biased because I changed my diet before quitting smoking, which worked for me, but just because smoking cessation in the most important step (it is) doesn't mean it has to be the first. It's one addiction that has the luxury of probably not killing you tomorrow, unlike a serious alcohol or drug addiction, so having "due time" in mind while establishing (for a few months) incentives and dietary habits that will greatly increase one's chance of beating the smoking habit can be a good approach.

A905679417ee71c3f9e2d88964b3b1f0

(368)

on April 12, 2012
at 02:54 AM

lol well for me the point is I am/was about 350 lbs.

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8 Answers

2
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on April 12, 2012
at 01:12 AM

I smoke a pipe or cigar on occasion. I smoked cigarettes for several years and for awhile would even re-imbibe while drinking with friends.

As they quit, I stopped getting my drinky-smoke on, and the last time I tried to have a cigarette I think I would have rather been punched in the taint by an angry gorilla... it was a bowl of suck.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 12, 2012
at 02:28 PM

I get the weirdest looks when I smoke a cigar. "You're HEALTHY, why are you SMOKING?" Meh. I probably smoke two a year, often in a celebratory fashion, and ... well, they're tasty. :-)

2
819edd55fe1231e3f3cc762937e792dc

on April 12, 2012
at 12:21 AM

I was a 22 year smoker and quit after 2 months of eating Paleo. I started power lifting and after 2 weeks decided that lifting was more important than smoking. I used Chantix to quit. For me that stuff was magic and I have almost a year behind me with out smoke. I would find something to focus on while you quit. You need to keep as busy as possible. Good luck Ender!!!

1
Fe6e37f8d4c49de1ecbc926c8900cd54

on April 12, 2012
at 02:51 AM

I feel your pain. I smoked for 7 years, and quit shortly after going paleo. Here are a few things that helped me stay off them:

-Green tea & really dark chocolate (90%). Both have stimulant properties that are similar to nicotine, and help curb cravings (not a ton, but enough to take the edge off).

-New hobbies. Any fun, active things you can do to keep your mind off of cigarettes, and break old habits are helpful. Rock climbing FTW! Also, coming up with new paleo recipes was a great distraction for me, as it was rewarding, it kept healthy habits salient, and it satisfied that good ol oral fixation.

-NO EXCEPTIONS EVER. It took me a long time to finally get it through my head that it's never "just one." Nothing it more frustrating than getting through all the withdrawal, only to slip up a few months later and find yourself back where you started.

-Nicotine lozenges (or whatever, but I prefer them to the nasty gum). These aren't great if you don't want to be addicted to nicotine, but I personally like the psychoactive properties of nicotine, and lozenges actually give you a better buzz than cigarettes. I started using them with the mindset that I was not "quitting smoking," but delivering my nicotine differently. In other words, I intended to become a lozenge addict. However, I found that I used them a lot at first, and then used them less and less without really realizing it, until I wasn't using them much at all. I still suck on one occasionally.

Some people have had luck with Chantix. It does make things easier in the short-term, but I found that it didn't really help me personally in the long term.

Good luck to you. Nothing makes quitting "easy," but paleo provided me with a lot of new experiences and new habits that perhaps made it easier to shake old pairings, and to keep my mind off of cigarettes through the worst part of the withdrawal.

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on April 12, 2012
at 01:42 AM

Hey, yo. I went through a BRIEF smoking stint, but no longer smoke. I quit cold turkey, but someone I used to know said a fast taper works well. Something like as many cigarettes as you want on the weekend, 5 monday, 4 tuesday, 3 wednesday, 2, tuesday, 1 monday, 1 saturday, 1 sunday, and then NONE! You can do it!

If it's an oral fixation thing, which is the case for many smokers; chew gum, carry zip bags of celery stalks to munch on, get a girlfriend if you don't already, do things to/with her using your tongue/mouth.

Hope that helps. You can quit if you really want to.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on April 12, 2012
at 12:40 PM

Having been the girlfriend of someone who quit smoking (i.e. the girl what suddenly got the brunt of someone's oral fixation and was chewed/nibbled/kissed/licked pretty near incessantly for several months) I have to say, please don't go that route.

1
Bbd50c115fa066bea3ac23a4e82447ff

(558)

on April 12, 2012
at 12:47 AM

I would check out Julia Ross's The Mood Cure, which has a lot of helpful information on using amino acids/vitamins/foods to help with quitting. You analyze why you smoke (for example, do you use it as an upper or a downer? To get more energy or to relax?) and then she suggests nutritional support to help with quitting. It can all be done with Paleo foods. I used her book to help with quitting my 2 litre plus habit of diet coke a day. I know diet soda seems trivial compared to smoking but it was surprisingly hard to give up (I had obsessive thoughts about it for three weeks...I would find myself spacing out in conversations because all I could think about was diet coke; luckily I maintained my "listening intently" face so my patients didn't notice wasn't all there!)

Some people may find that doing a very strict Paleo plan for a set period of time, say a Whole30 for a month, is helpful in giving some structure for quitting smoking...while other people may find that having to exert willpower on the food front makes it more difficult to focus on smoking cessation because it's hard to give up so many things at once. It really depends on the individual. But I agree with Dave S.'s comment that smoking cessation is more important (IMHO).

Good luck to you. I think both endeavors are very worthwhile. And if you quit smoking you'll have more money to spend on Paleo food!

59d367d77f4082717bade07508624db8

(1198)

on April 12, 2012
at 04:01 AM

I'm biased because I changed my diet before quitting smoking, which worked for me, but just because smoking cessation in the most important step (it is) doesn't mean it has to be the first. It's one addiction that has the luxury of probably not killing you tomorrow, unlike a serious alcohol or drug addiction, so having "due time" in mind while establishing (for a few months) incentives and dietary habits that will greatly increase one's chance of beating the smoking habit can be a good approach.

1
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 11, 2012
at 11:24 PM

I was a moderate smoker and quit 6 months prior to going paleo. Paleo is good for your health, but quiting smoking is more important IMHO. I doubt that paleo would make quiting easier, in fact, it may make it harder due to the fact that you may find complying to paleo difficult as it is (at least initially).

Smoking and paleo makes me think of putting premium fuel into a Lambourghini and then taking the engine out with a shotgun. I mean, what's the point?

A905679417ee71c3f9e2d88964b3b1f0

(368)

on April 12, 2012
at 02:54 AM

lol well for me the point is I am/was about 350 lbs.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 12, 2012
at 01:34 PM

Eating better and losimg weight would be helpful for you, but I tend to think quiting smoking is even more important as you are a heavy smoker. Really, you need to do both. Do what you can. I feel your pain.

0
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 12, 2012
at 02:34 AM

I was always a "casual smoker"- smoked mostly on weekends, or when I wanted breaks at work. Could stop and start at will for several weeks. I still have the occasional cigarette when out with friends, but those are few and far between.

My mom starting smoking when she was 9 years old and quit in her 30's with sunflower seeds. She used to chew on sunflower seeds for YEARS afterwards because of the oral fixation. She still swears by it as the easiest, cheapest, lowest side effect method of quitting smoking.

0
59d367d77f4082717bade07508624db8

on April 12, 2012
at 01:26 AM

First of all, the "need" for oral activity is 99% physical nicotine addiction. The oral fixation conveniently disappears when I have a stable repletion of nicotine in my bloodstream. It's your mind tricking you into smoking, it's not its own entity.

I quit about 4 months after changing the way I ate. It DID make quitting easier.

Once I got into a groove (and I did need to allow myself the time to get there), I no longer needed to negotiate a tanking mood, energy crashes, disrupted sleep, and depression with cigarettes, because my diet was no longer screwing me up on a daily basis. I used cigarettes like a tool, and diet silenced a good chunk of those variables that constantly needed adjusting with nicotine/coffee/alcohol. I saw a lot of health benefits even when still smoking, and after removing all that "noise", cigarettes became it's own superfluous cycle of nicotine repletion alternating with nicotine withdrawal, used for it's own sake, which wasn't obvious before. If that makes sense. I wanted to start exercising, and couldn't well do it while still smoking, so I quit.

Plus, after I quit, I already had all of these new habits like cooking and exercising up and running in order to substitute the swathes of time and thought formerly dedicated to the smoking habit. It's very hard to quit an addictive substance while keeping everything else the same. I need to to see immediate benefits to quit smoking, it's how an addicts mind works, and I wouldn't have seen them were they buried under a metabolic mess from a bad drug-like diet. Some may see it the other way around. Getting truly healthy, for me, has been a domino effect. I just needed to pick the right one one I want to flip first, and the rest toppled.

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