6

votes

Advice on quitting smoking

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 22, 2011 at 12:41 AM

Anyone out there who has successfully quit smoking tobacco after going paleo,could you please give me some tips?Obviously the standard methods of hard candy,lollipops,gum ect don't apply anymore..need some new ideas. My biggest concern is the blood sugar crashes the first few weeks.Is there something in particular I can supplement to help this? UPDATE:Been using an electronic cigarette for two months now, and it works like a charm.I smoked it constantly at first,then found myself wanting it less and less.Now I might use it twice a day,mainly in the car.Thanks for the advice everyone!

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 06, 2011
at 11:52 AM

Chantix Doc? The side effects reported with this are somewhat scary. I also don't get the notion that you shouldn't improve your nutrition while still smoking. I would think it would increase chances of success if anything.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on November 05, 2011
at 06:36 PM

Stopping smoking is more important for your health than eating paleo. Just don't let yourself go completely. Realize that nicotine hits the dopamine receptors, so coming off of it will lead to increased hunger. Have a look at wellbutrin/bupropion. Other than that, do whatever you have to do to quit.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on November 05, 2011
at 01:01 PM

Congrats! Keep it up!

1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

(1600)

on February 25, 2011
at 12:29 AM

And now, not only do I have the flu,I got my period on top of that and nicotine withdrawal.LOL.Been trying to keep moving as much as I can,but letting myself have some sweets for this week.Just chocolate and fruit,though.

1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

(1600)

on February 23, 2011
at 09:24 PM

Weird,but my worst cravings hit after 9 weeks.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on February 22, 2011
at 06:15 PM

My mom smoked heavily since her teens- had the best results with hypnosis! She did end up relapsing, but quit for several months; longer than any other attempt.

65660697ed243c7980725fd014eb00e0

(494)

on February 22, 2011
at 04:52 PM

I always smoked less when I was sick, so perhaps it's a blessing in disguise. Good luck with the quitting and the flu!

8d7eb02fef2eca1a2c418d5f6ed02d8e

(240)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:49 PM

I have to agree with Chris, the gum can definitely work. I used the gum for at least 6 months, slowly tapered and then switched to regular gum for quite some time. When I started strictly paleo is when I found time to remove all gum. Good luck, if you want to do it - you can.

1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

(1600)

on February 22, 2011
at 01:44 PM

Ha and now God gave me the flu on top of it..life is cruel

Cb2415c2aef964ab499a09dc92ae7e01

(783)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:47 AM

Definitely! It is the cigs. Actually I went to the emergency room in a panic when I timed my resting pulse at 130-140. That was at half a pack for less for a few days (my 'max') usually less than that. Anyway, everything will calm down very quickly once you stop putting more nicotine in your system.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:27 AM

willpower has nothing to do with the oxidative damage done to the reward/addiction centers in the VM hypothalamus.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:54 AM

Good Luck. and to make it clear.....all this is laid out in handouts and give to patients in verbal and written forms......and they are told they will go get labs today and comeback to see me for the results of the labs and to prove to them that there is metabolic changes reflected in their labs to prove my point. It gets their attn fast and many PCPs send patients to me to get them off tobacco because of how effective it is. Diet and supplementation are the missing link for most smokers who fail. Its because we as docs have not gone far enough to correct the oxidative damage quickly.

1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

(1600)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:50 AM

The raised heart rate,along with dizzy spells,are a big reason I want to quit.My co worker had to pick me up off the floor at work one morning(I had knelt down to pick something up and suddenly had horrible vertigo).It only happens after a cigarette,so there has to be a connection.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:50 AM

The recs usually shock the smoker because they have never had this explained in detail......but I will not perform the service they wanted until the smoking stops. And that means no surgery. I have had this policy for over ten yrs. And there are only a few medical conditions where I back off that. If there is a true emergency or that something else could damage them immediately from non treatment. That is precisely how I do it.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:48 AM

in the nasophayngeal and cardiopulonary tree and the carotid body and sinus receptors and in the liver. 4. Addresses the mitochondria. The powerplant of the cell. The engine. And the liver is the controler of our metabolism. Not the thyroid or the gut or the brain. It is the major detoxifier that is under constant assault and needs to be in optimal condition to deal with the constant damage from the portal vein and not from the tobacco. I use baseline labs to assess the severity of the oxidative load. I also directly assess the anti oxiditive fuel tank.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:45 AM

That protects the mitochondria. Namely the glutiathione system. Now discussing the 4 key points above. 1. Chantix blocks the physiologic addiction by blocking nictine recpetors in the hypothalmus. 2. Smoking cessation helps with the behavior issues around smoking.....for example why do you smoke post coffee, food and sex? This solves the behavioral component. 3. The dietary change address several issues....one the severe antioxident deficits itself but also the leaky gut and complete loss of the immune system

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:40 AM

to quit while changing your lifestyle is counterproductive. You must go after the issue that hurts your mitochondria the most. You have to make your mitochindria less leaky and less suspetible to any oxidation. To do that requires 4 key steps. Those steps in order are 1. Use of Chantix. 2. Going to a smoking cessation program 3. concurrent use of massive dietary anti oxident foods. 4. supplementation with supranormal doses of specific anti oxidents to offset the current oxidative onslaught. You must realize that when you smoke you are overutilizing the bodies antioxident system.......

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:36 AM

The smoker constantly oxidizes their body and all organ systems....some at very very fast rates. The obese do the same thing.....but it takes decades to get to the same levels of disease......think of an obese persons skin and a smokers skin.....smokers age internally as fast as their skin looks. The obese skin does not. But after 40 yrs their entire body does wind up fully oxidized and they sucumb to the SAME diseases as the smokers do. The smokers however are more effected by the oxidation because of how rapid the oxidation occurs in them. Moreover, there successes rate of trying....

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:31 AM

Using an analogy. Smoking and being obese cause the same overall factors to our mitochondria which is the source of our health or disease state boiled down. So think of it like this. If youre in NYC and you and your partner need to get to LA....You are the smoker and your partner is the obese person. You the smoker take a flight and get there in 4 hrs but your partner drove on I-80 and got there in one week. The issue now is both of you are in LA now. One got to LA fast....the other slow. Now take that reality and think about health.......

7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:25 AM

Although not my path, definitely good advice. I was helped by the fact that I had started a new job around the time that I firmly decided to quit...the job just sucked in all of my attneton and energy, leaving very little space for smoking.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:24 AM

This is an area I have alot of experience in and a lot of success. Mixing it with Paleo however is wrong. Infact the smoking needs to stop before you optimize your nutrition. Controversial on PaleoHacks? Maybe....but its based on good medicine. I will explain.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on February 22, 2011
at 01:42 AM

I don't have any advice, but just wanted to say good luck. You can do it!

  • 1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

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20 Answers

11
Fac1af832cc3c6a20059c41411fd0f6b

(1548)

on February 22, 2011
at 01:56 AM

I have successfully quit twice, and failed 20+ times. This is the experiences with my 2 successful quits, the first time for 4.5 years (I started up as revenge to the ex...stupidity I know), this time for 3 years so far and no inclination to start again.

1) Just quit. Quit programs, etc are made by people who are trying to sell you products.
2) deep breaths. They are the secret to quitting and getting over the pangs. You feel the need to smoke, take a deep breath and let it out sloooooow. It is more effective than any gum, mint etc. Do not set a date, do not set a time, do not pick an easy day or a weekend or a vacation. Quit mid work week. The only exception to this is possibly quitting when suffering a nasty cold etc, but that is a stressful time. 3) avoid replacements. Replacements set you up for failure because when you run out where are you going? You are going to get more replacements at the local mart that also sells smokes and you are as likely to buy smokes as another candy bar.
4) Do not keep track. Keeping track of days reminds you about smoking. Being reminded about smoking is bad. The same sort of mentality applies to replacements. You must tell yourself that you are not a smoker. Not an ex smoker, not "quit for 3 days", but that you are not a smoker and do not have any desire to do so. 5) BE ready to hack up crap for a long time, and them when you do heavy exercise, to cough up more crap. Hock loogies and be proud that your body is fixing itself and do not be embarrassed about it, but also get that crap out away from you. Enjoy the extra range you will develop when expectorating, but mainly it is sick nasty stuff that the body trying really hard to get rid of, so, uh, get rid of it. The thought of decades worth of carcinogens running through the digestive tract is not pleasant. 6) Test yourself prior: Put yourself in trigger situations and enjoy them without a cig. Set yourself up prior to actually quitting by not driving with a cig or having one after dinner. I noticed that the sooner I smoked after I woke up the more I smoked the rest of the day. Wait until evening. Maybe smoke only outside. Adapting how and when you smoke will give you the evidence and confidence to just go without later.
7) my biggest worry was "what will I do with out the breaks?" The answer is that I did not need breaks. My time is filled with my life and is much more enjoyable without an extra urge to feed. You don't need the breaks either.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:27 AM

willpower has nothing to do with the oxidative damage done to the reward/addiction centers in the VM hypothalamus.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:36 AM

The smoker constantly oxidizes their body and all organ systems....some at very very fast rates. The obese do the same thing.....but it takes decades to get to the same levels of disease......think of an obese persons skin and a smokers skin.....smokers age internally as fast as their skin looks. The obese skin does not. But after 40 yrs their entire body does wind up fully oxidized and they sucumb to the SAME diseases as the smokers do. The smokers however are more effected by the oxidation because of how rapid the oxidation occurs in them. Moreover, there successes rate of trying....

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:40 AM

to quit while changing your lifestyle is counterproductive. You must go after the issue that hurts your mitochondria the most. You have to make your mitochindria less leaky and less suspetible to any oxidation. To do that requires 4 key steps. Those steps in order are 1. Use of Chantix. 2. Going to a smoking cessation program 3. concurrent use of massive dietary anti oxident foods. 4. supplementation with supranormal doses of specific anti oxidents to offset the current oxidative onslaught. You must realize that when you smoke you are overutilizing the bodies antioxident system.......

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:24 AM

This is an area I have alot of experience in and a lot of success. Mixing it with Paleo however is wrong. Infact the smoking needs to stop before you optimize your nutrition. Controversial on PaleoHacks? Maybe....but its based on good medicine. I will explain.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:31 AM

Using an analogy. Smoking and being obese cause the same overall factors to our mitochondria which is the source of our health or disease state boiled down. So think of it like this. If youre in NYC and you and your partner need to get to LA....You are the smoker and your partner is the obese person. You the smoker take a flight and get there in 4 hrs but your partner drove on I-80 and got there in one week. The issue now is both of you are in LA now. One got to LA fast....the other slow. Now take that reality and think about health.......

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:45 AM

That protects the mitochondria. Namely the glutiathione system. Now discussing the 4 key points above. 1. Chantix blocks the physiologic addiction by blocking nictine recpetors in the hypothalmus. 2. Smoking cessation helps with the behavior issues around smoking.....for example why do you smoke post coffee, food and sex? This solves the behavioral component. 3. The dietary change address several issues....one the severe antioxident deficits itself but also the leaky gut and complete loss of the immune system

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:48 AM

in the nasophayngeal and cardiopulonary tree and the carotid body and sinus receptors and in the liver. 4. Addresses the mitochondria. The powerplant of the cell. The engine. And the liver is the controler of our metabolism. Not the thyroid or the gut or the brain. It is the major detoxifier that is under constant assault and needs to be in optimal condition to deal with the constant damage from the portal vein and not from the tobacco. I use baseline labs to assess the severity of the oxidative load. I also directly assess the anti oxiditive fuel tank.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:50 AM

The recs usually shock the smoker because they have never had this explained in detail......but I will not perform the service they wanted until the smoking stops. And that means no surgery. I have had this policy for over ten yrs. And there are only a few medical conditions where I back off that. If there is a true emergency or that something else could damage them immediately from non treatment. That is precisely how I do it.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:54 AM

Good Luck. and to make it clear.....all this is laid out in handouts and give to patients in verbal and written forms......and they are told they will go get labs today and comeback to see me for the results of the labs and to prove to them that there is metabolic changes reflected in their labs to prove my point. It gets their attn fast and many PCPs send patients to me to get them off tobacco because of how effective it is. Diet and supplementation are the missing link for most smokers who fail. Its because we as docs have not gone far enough to correct the oxidative damage quickly.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 06, 2011
at 11:52 AM

Chantix Doc? The side effects reported with this are somewhat scary. I also don't get the notion that you shouldn't improve your nutrition while still smoking. I would think it would increase chances of success if anything.

6
807ea18498bcc5474b249a184f4d1ad6

on February 22, 2011
at 01:05 AM

I don't know if this helps, but I went cold turkey, and when I had a craving I did 5 push ups, or drank a glass of water. The biggest trick is to refocus that craving towards something more productive. Even writing in a journal what you are feeling can be positive.

7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:25 AM

Although not my path, definitely good advice. I was helped by the fact that I had started a new job around the time that I firmly decided to quit...the job just sucked in all of my attneton and energy, leaving very little space for smoking.

5
74d0407ca99061cab2512ed83683b498

on February 22, 2011
at 01:20 AM

Deep breathing. Seriously. Do some pranayama style breaths where you breathe out through one nostril and then in again, and then switch and repeat, holding alternating nostrils closed with either the pinky or thumb of one hand. Close your eyes and focus on your breath and the craving will pass. Severe cravings usually only last about 5 minutes. If you can get through 5 minutes, that's another cigarette you don't smoke.

Also, if you need something to chew on, try these tea tree oil toothpicks:

http://www.iherb.com/tea-tree-therapy-tea-tree-toothpicks-100-approx/14157?at=0

More fun than your average toothpick.

And if you don't make it one day, or one hour, try again the next hour or the next day or the next week. The important thing is to keep trying. Good luck -- at some point in the future you will just be grossed out by them.

4
7a1d67d93f254b982e0be4e54086cb4a

(415)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:07 AM

I found the nicotine gum very helpful. It took me about 100,000 attempts to quit before I found the method that would succeed. I think the gum helps you break all of the habits associated with the smoking.

Substitute the gum for smoking as long as you need to then cut down very slowly once you are ready...this process took me about 6 months to a year, but it worked...it is a bit expensive, but much better than the altermative, which is smoking.

I forgot to mention...I haven't smoked since 8/2005 (so this has been a succcessful, long term quit without terrible cravings), and I started my process with the gum around 2/2005...so you have to hang in there and slowly taper...I did the cold turkey thing at one point (and that can work for some folks), but found that very disagreeable.

Very slowly tapering the gum works (and slowly means just that)...remember: it took awhile for you to become a cigarette addict, it will take awhile to break the habit.

Good luck and don't give up.

8d7eb02fef2eca1a2c418d5f6ed02d8e

(240)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:49 PM

I have to agree with Chris, the gum can definitely work. I used the gum for at least 6 months, slowly tapered and then switched to regular gum for quite some time. When I started strictly paleo is when I found time to remove all gum. Good luck, if you want to do it - you can.

3
84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 22, 2011
at 05:51 PM

Many people (know one personally) recommend Allen Carr's material.

3
D05728a0613658cb5b2f652eb6f36783

(125)

on February 22, 2011
at 05:05 PM

I've been smoke free for 23 days now. My tips include:

1) Sleep as much as you can. Staying up late and feeling tired during the day definately gave me urges. 2) Join a recreational sports league (flag football, soccer, etc). 3) Tell your friends you're quitting, especially the ones who don't believe you can quit. 4) Avoid social drinking for a few weeks. 5) When you get a craving, think about how long you've already quit, and the negative feeling you'll get soon after breaking your streak.

For me, the First three days were the worse. Cravings peaked around then. Cravings gradually subsided over next two weeks. Currently, I occasionally get an urge, but I can easily stand around while my friends smoke after meals.

1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

(1600)

on February 23, 2011
at 09:24 PM

Weird,but my worst cravings hit after 9 weeks.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on November 05, 2011
at 01:01 PM

Congrats! Keep it up!

2
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on November 05, 2011
at 01:12 PM

I quit cigarettes for good about 11 years ago, and it took me a bazillion tries. What finally worked for me:

1) adopt a hobby that is incompatible with smoking. For me I started somewhat serious bike riding. Riding 20-30 miles is hard enough, but doing it after a half pack of cigarettes is downright painful. The riding made me more reluctant to smoke since I knew i would really pay for it later.

2) change your peer pressure. If you hang out with smokers, stop hanging out with them (a difficult proposition perhaps, but important. BTW Ozzy Osbourne gives the same advice to people trying to kick more serious drugs). If you have other friends that are non smokers, tell them you are trying to quit so they will nag you when you fall off the wagon, so they can apply peer pressure to help you quit.

In my case, I sought out friends through bike riding and they of course were all non smokers, and that helped me to both continue with the bike riding and stop the smoking.

This was back when smoking was allowed in bars and restaurants. I found it nearly impossible to go into a bar and not smoke, because the place was full of smoke. This is probably one of the main reasons I kept failing. These days, most places are smoke free, so I would start frequenting places that don't allow smoking.

Eventually, after falling off the wagon eleventeen times, I was embarking on a 6+ backpacking trip with my best friend, and made a bet with him. The first time I had a cigarette, I had to give him a dollar, the next time, two dollars, the next time, four dollars... We spent every day together for 6 weeks so this was effective. I think we got up to 32 dollars and I finally quit, and that has stuck to this day. Months later he gave me the money back and I spent it on a restaurant / bar tab for the two of us.

1
1f6840fcc4c21357e0e3a5a31a039b09

on February 22, 2011
at 07:25 PM

I quit smoking in 2008 after 20 years of smoking a pack a day. I never smoked more than a pack but I started on Marlboro Lights and after 20 years I was smoking pall mall filterless (more nicotine per cig).

I quit by reading Allen Carr's book "The Easy Way to Quit Smoking." A friend turned me on to the book and I have had three friends quit by reading it. Get it used on Amazon, You dont have to buy anything else. I tried to quit many times before ("quitting is easy, I did it a thousand times") but the book helped me to quit for good.

1
D072e15aaeac3a4357762cf516ec1313

(10)

on February 22, 2011
at 06:52 PM

I stopped in Aug 2010 and went Paleo in Sept( although I have been intuitively Paleo since reading Yudkin's Pure White and Deadly in the early 70's. Sorry but I have quit numerous times by different methods. I have spent a small cottage on fags. You may not be able to avoid deep depression and misery for 2 weeks after. You may be hateful to your loved ones and even imagine they hate you. Sleep a lot and spoil yourself. GOOD LUCK WITH THIS ..........Fred

1
Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

on February 22, 2011
at 07:01 AM

Sort of piggy-backing on what DS said above, the thing that really helped me to get over a 20 year Copenhagen habit, was shame. Once I truly decided to quit for real and for good, I told everyone that is important to me about what I was doing. Not only did I get a lot of positive support, which obviously helps quite a bit. I also had the nagging in the back of my head knowing that if I slipped up, I would have to tell everyone close and important to me, with my tail between my legs, that I failed, again. You can call it pride or shame or whatever, but it worked wonders for me.

1
1f96ce108240f19345c05704c7709dad

(1061)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:48 AM

You might try hypnosis, bittykitty.

I have known a number of former, long-term, heavy smokers who gave it up after ONE hypnosis session - from a good hypnotist who specialized in getting his clients to stop smoking.

None of these folks had withdrawal symptoms and did not miss the smokes.

Hypnosis may seem expensive; but just compare that cost to the cost of cigarettes for a month or two, or a year.

Some people also find it easier to have a buddy who is also quitting smoking at the same time - they lean on each other, encourage, etc.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on February 22, 2011
at 06:15 PM

My mom smoked heavily since her teens- had the best results with hypnosis! She did end up relapsing, but quit for several months; longer than any other attempt.

1
5a9f0a4f2d5e59ad1b7768028d91ab88

(10)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:28 AM

I am a physician and have arrived at the following method for getting my patients to quit smoking. Forget about Champix, nicorette gum, nicotine patches, zyban, etc. Nothing you have to pay for is going to work. All you are doing is contributing to the bottom line of the companies who produce this stuff.

You need the following: one ziplock bag which goes in the fridge and one empty cardboard box which goes in the most popular room in your abode(eg kitchen, tv room, living room). The place where you enjoy spending the most time.

There is only one rule and that is "you can never go back".

So let us start with the assumption that you are a pack a day smoker. A pack contains 25 cigarettes. You commence by removing one cigarette from the pack which you then place in the ziplock bag in the fridge. You smoke the other twenty-four cigarettes that day. You can never go back to twenty-five cigarettes once you have reduced your consumption to twenty-four. After twenty-four days you will have twenty-four cigarettes in the ziplock bag. On that day you will remove the bag from the fridge and you will then smoke all your cigarettes from the bag that day and replace it in the fridge at the end of the day. You can decrease your consumption as quickly as you like but you can never go back to a larger number of cigarettes smoked. For example, once you remove 2 cigarettes from the pack (you can never return to smoking twenty four cigs per day), it will take only twelve days to fill the ziplock bag to your chosen number number of cigarettes. Wash, rinse, repeat until you finally decide to quit.

Oh, by the way here is the kicker. You do not throw away your cigarette packs. At the end of the day the pack is deposited into the empty cardboard box where all family members and visitors can stare in awe at the number of packs you are going through. Oh, I forgot (not really); You don't get to throw away the box until you have quit smoking for eighteen months. The largest number of packs it has taken any patient in my practice to quit is "900"(2pk/day smoker). Think about that for a minute. 900 packs of cigarettes in your living room for eighteen months.

You don't just get to freak out your family members. You get to freak yourself out.
Lastly, I have had several patients wait up to 6 months before deciding to go ahead with this. That's the kind of negative feedback this method is capable of creating.

Finally, several of my patients have added a twist to the above by not throwing out the packs all at once, but rather removing the packs from the box at the same rate they were initially placed. Just to make sure that they were not tempted. By the time you get to eighteen months of no smoking, you're usually good to go. Of course, if you relapse it's another eighteen months of the box occupying your favourite room.

1
34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:27 AM

Watching my mom die of lung cancer over the course of about 3 months from diagnosis to death pretty much did it for me. One of her lungs collapsed and she had a really hard time breathing which happens to be my biggest fear, to die of suffocation. I quit 9 years ago with patches and gum - I chewed that gum for probably a year but it works. Do whatever you have to do to quit, I convinced myself that if I did not stop smoking I would die and that helped motivate me as well.

1
C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:04 AM

Carry something round and thin like a pencil and suck on it. When you realise how ridiculous that is, you might be encouraged to stop smoking. (That's what I did, true story) (but not after paleo, many years ago.)

1
Cb2415c2aef964ab499a09dc92ae7e01

(783)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:46 AM

I smoked Native Spirits (not heavy, but still) for a few years and totally quit at the end of 2010. Still going strong. Maybe this is not long enough to give advice, but here are some of the factors that helped me quit.

  • My heart rate was getting uncomfortably high at times. Point here is to try to develop some natural revulsion to help overcome the addiction and images/feelings for your willpower to remember when you get a craving. If you don't have anything like this maybe make a point to look at a pic of a diseased lung or something.
  • This helped me just decide to not be a smoker anymore, and that was that. I'm not really having too many cravings these days, but just tonight had a very upsetting conversation with someone and the thought was there for a few seconds. But I didn't want to mess up 7 weeks clean and I can come back to that fundamental decision - 'not smoking!'
  • The first cig after a break is calming, but after that it is just addiction/habit. Developing other habits and ways to calm down are essential. As others have mentioned deep breathing is key. Here is another variation: http://www.themessenger.info/content/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1110:the-relaxing-breath&catid=179:healing&Itemid=100069
    Instead of a cig break, just go for an air break, water break, whatever.
  • Work out! This has probably been the most important for me. I'm doing a mix of barbells, kettlebells and and rowing machine. You want something to get you breathing. Barbells help with confidence for men and probably women also. Conditioning workouts give you endorphins and both help the body have a natural revulsion for smoke. Kettlebells in particular really get those endorphins happening very quickly. I like the push-up idea that someone mentioned too. Or burpees. Whatever you like.
  • Know in advance that you are likely to have some cravings if you do an IF. When the body goes into autophagy ie cleaning up mode it will deal with some of the toxins in the lungs.

1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

(1600)

on February 22, 2011
at 02:50 AM

The raised heart rate,along with dizzy spells,are a big reason I want to quit.My co worker had to pick me up off the floor at work one morning(I had knelt down to pick something up and suddenly had horrible vertigo).It only happens after a cigarette,so there has to be a connection.

Cb2415c2aef964ab499a09dc92ae7e01

(783)

on February 22, 2011
at 03:47 AM

Definitely! It is the cigs. Actually I went to the emergency room in a panic when I timed my resting pulse at 130-140. That was at half a pack for less for a few days (my 'max') usually less than that. Anyway, everything will calm down very quickly once you stop putting more nicotine in your system.

1
5672b2d190891342389e764cc4056ca9

(1304)

on February 22, 2011
at 01:35 AM

Very tough to do both things: quit smoking and eat paleo! But the first is so important that you shuold do everything it takes (and I would allow some candies and gums here and there), and then go back on track with the rest of your life, including avoiding eating crap.

This being said, of course the ideal is to quit AND eat well. If you are ready for this, at least don't do LC. So, eat your normal "paleo" food, maybe allow more frequent meals (IF would be so difficult!), and keep clean raw veggies at hand to munch on when you have cravings for a smoke: cucumbers, carrots, romaine lettuce, peppers, celery, olives, you name it.

If you can, when the cravings kick in, go for a walk or a run or do any kind of physical activity.

Go on a trip for a few days, in the outdoors, i.e. backpacking: it helps a lot with breaking the "habit" of smoking, with all those little daily rituals that make it so damn difficult to quit.

1
64242a1130eb51f4852f78beed38b3d5

(1343)

on February 22, 2011
at 01:06 AM

Chantix. Willpower.

0
F3920b85be76a5d8cf466d805bfb99e4

(638)

on November 06, 2011
at 04:45 AM

Even if there is a relapse, don't stop trying. Those who end up quitting, kept trying to quit before they finally succeeded.

I used Chantix, for about 3 weeks. Build up the amount in your system while continuing to smoke, then continue taking it for a week or two after giving up the smokes. It took most of my cravings away. I still had some cravings, but they weren't too strong and didn't last long. Warning: do not take it on an empty stomach! it may cause wild dreams.

Change your environment or your routine. I went on a vacation for a week, got out of my normal surroundings that had all the triggers. After coming home, I started a 1000 pc. jigsaw puzzle that stayed on the table for weeks, whenever I got an urge, I went and worked on the puzzle - redirected the mind.

Be Prepared. Think about all the triggers, and what you will do instead of smoke. Anger, boredom, stress are normal triggers, how will you minimize these?

Find oral and olfactory diversions: I found some ceramic filters that felt like a cigarette in my fingers. I would "puff" on these, but of course, they only delivered air. A small stir straw works well too. As does flavored toothpicks. Always have something handy. Carry baggies of lemon wedges, fresh mint or herbs.

Good luck!

0
2f61c841a2834c23f15e6134cf733bff

on November 05, 2011
at 06:38 PM

Acupuncture worked for me. But that was years before I switched to this paleo lifestyle.

0
3f3236d1f951d4b4c25eff387699a905

(554)

on November 05, 2011
at 09:44 AM

I found that high protein kills my food cravings, and with it went my cravings for smoking as well. It's almost strange how I don't think about it anymore, so I forget that I've smoked for 7 years sometimes and think I've always been smoke free.

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