16

votes

Identifying and fixing personal odors after no-poo no-soap no-deodorant

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 24, 2011 at 1:47 AM

I stopped using shampoo and conditioners about three years ago, excepting a small period of time when I tried some fancy detergent-free hair "cleanser" salon product for a few months last year, but for at least six months I've been once again no-'poo, water only. Likewise, for almost a year I've been using minimal soap in the shower, only in the (ahem) areas and that's a goat milk soap which I've thought has always smelled extremely mild and neutral. And for almost five years I've used only the crystal stick type of deodorant. Obviously I'm going for the "neutral scent" effect, which seems to be a pretty common result among paleo-folk who've made similar lifestyle changes.

But today I was told that I stink. I feel really bad about it, because now I am starting to worry that I've never smelled "neutral" and have only thought I was getting away with paleo-bathing habits on the basis of other people's politeness. It's made me reconsider all the various ways I might be acquiring a stench.

Unfortunately I don't have a lot of specific data to work with, but my best guess at the moment is that this is a recent phenomenon, and there have been some recent (minor) changes I've noticed. For one, my digestion has not been so good for the past couple of months: I've been having more rumbling stomach noises and more gas throughout the day, as well as being less "regular". Also, my sinuses have been worse for the same time period, and I've been more "mucusy" in general. Neither of these changes are obviously related to any changes in diet or exercise or any other obvious state of health; whatever is causing these changes is mostly invisible to me (so far).

I'm starting to wonder if this all might be related to having a diet high in saturated fats. I know that there is the phenomenon of the "ethnic smell" that people don't talk about in polite company - whereby folks who eat a particular ethnic (in contrast to mainstream America) cuisine regularly are thought to smell different than others, and presumably this is due to large concentrations of certain foods "working their way out" of the person's system. It occurs to me that perhaps this is what is happening here; perhaps the daily bacon breakfasts have caught up with me and I've crossed some biochemical fat saturation threshold and now I'm paying the price. I have no idea if this makes any scientific sense, but it's all I can think of, and I wanted to know if anyone else here has had anything similar happen in terms of symptoms and smell.

Also, how the hell do you correct your body odor if you don't notice it? Is there someplace I can go where someone will smell me over a period of time so I can make adjustments and find out if they're working? Aaaargh!

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Theoretically, that's what the crystal stick is supposed to do as well. And likewise, I can't tell if it's effective or if people were just too polite to say anything. But thank you, I will add isopropyl alcohol to my options.

E7adfe31507efb7c935f618a829f56d6

(1507)

on June 28, 2012
at 07:32 PM

Just want to add that I started using this recipe after reading it here and it has been AMAZING. i LOVE it and it lasts forever and i do not smell. hooray! and thanks. (I use lavender for the essential oil). oNe thing i noticed is that I sometimes get oily, discolored stains under the armpits on certain materials, anyone else? Do i need to tweak the recipe?

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 03, 2011
at 01:28 PM

Also beware of mineral deficiencies: Zinc plays a role in many body functions including taste, protection of the teeth, restoration of enzyme function of the immune system and skin, antiseptic, protection of the nervous system, sexual functions, reduction of perspiration and sweaty feet, and cleansing and repair of the lymphatic system. Lymphatic system removes waste and toxins from the body.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 03, 2011
at 01:24 PM

yes... and why does the bacteria proliferate and not remain in balance on the surface of the skin? The kind of bacteria that *should be* on the skin is lactobacillus. Research the lymph.

691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on March 01, 2011
at 04:56 PM

hehe, hagan dasz five is not paleo... id cut out that sugar before i cut out deodorant

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on March 01, 2011
at 04:39 PM

This is silly. Human body odor is caused by bacteria proliferating on the surface of the skin. Everyone sweats and sheds skin, which this bacteria lives on as it produces it's smelly waste. Different people host different bacteria.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 01, 2011
at 04:21 PM

really good recommendations!

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on February 27, 2011
at 04:05 PM

Thank you, DAC!

6a4fd73b4ae4761eefec8e0d38e6f224

(1008)

on February 26, 2011
at 02:28 AM

p.s., I remember reading something - on this thread or another one - about synthetic fabrics, and how they can really make you stink. I have definitely found this to be true. So what you're wearing could be a factor.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:43 PM

Ironically, everyone at my workplace smells like acrylic monomer to everyone else in the world as soon as we leave, and none of us notice it because we're so used to being contaminated!

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:41 PM

No, not really. I prefer natural fibers, too.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:40 PM

Thanks, L.S. It was very politely said by my boss. One thing I am still trying to figure out is when and how this crossed the line from simply being my own smell to being too much of it.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:35 PM

NB&S: no, that's precisely what the crystal stick is meant to do - create an environment where the odor=causing bacteria cannot live while leaving the sweating mechanism unaffected.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:33 PM

Thanks, DAC. I'll experiment with this.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:32 PM

Theresa, I agree, and in fact I deliberately don't complain about my co-worker's body odors whether natural or artificial. But I've had feedback from other people during this time period who have told me that I generally smell "like nothing". And also the fact that my supervisor at work flirted shamelessly with me for my first six months there... I am inclined to take that as feedback and implicit acceptance that I didn't smell *too* bad.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:27 PM

The main reason I moved away from conventional deodorizing anti-perspirants was that they left me sweating and smelly more than before I'd put them on.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on February 25, 2011
at 06:29 PM

Perhaps, but that hasn't happened to me yet and I've been doing this every day for the past 7-8 years now.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 25, 2011
at 04:45 AM

It seems like we come from different places, Wozza. I still maintain that the intent behind the vocalization is of import -- randomly flinging around insults is one thing; delicately remarking in private is another. We, too, refer to this as "helpful and friendly" as well as a little thing called "tactful". :)

C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on February 25, 2011
at 03:53 AM

Where I come from that called being honest and is considered helpful and friendly.

6a4fd73b4ae4761eefec8e0d38e6f224

(1008)

on February 25, 2011
at 12:51 AM

Ok - here is what I recorded the last time I made the deodorant: *4 Tbsp baking soda *2 Tbsp melted coconut oil *1 Tbsp cornstarch *[I added 1 Tbsp of an antibacterial pharmaceutical, which you would probably want to leave out and/or replace with extra oil or water.] *essential oil(s) of your choice, if you choose. I can't recall how much I used. Just keep adding drops until it smells nice. :) Blend well and store in a jar or other airtight container. This made enough to last for months. If you ever find it's not spreadable, just wet your finger before you apply it. A little dab'll do ya.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on February 25, 2011
at 12:17 AM

I agree, however most people don't seem to be aware of that.

07ad8e05f734cb1deec5479dc0e4a194

(315)

on February 25, 2011
at 12:12 AM

Oh, duh, to my recipe please add 1 tablespoon of baking soda. sorree!

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on February 24, 2011
at 08:45 PM

I also definitely need deodorant, and sometimes that doesn't even work.

Ef4c5b09fdccf73be575d3a0c267fdd9

(2539)

on February 24, 2011
at 08:42 PM

Not to mention that layering your pits with 70% alcohol is going to cause some skin/rash issues in the future.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on February 24, 2011
at 08:23 PM

I'm not sure I agree. Rubbing alcohol only kills odor-causing bacteria; it's not an anti-perspirant. You'll still sweat but you won't stink.

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:56 PM

Supposedly there's a difference; aluminum chlorohydrate and/or aluminum zirconium are what's in most deodorants, and that's where the link to Alzheimer's is present. Potassium aluminum sulfate occurs naturally, and it seems that the molecules are too large to be absorbed through the skin. Further, ammonium alum blocks are synthetic, and may warrant further investigation. The consensus seems to be that potassium aluminium sulphate-based alum blocks are okay, however.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:55 PM

Not all baking soda is equal. I have had some Arm & Hammer that is a little rough. My solution was to put it in a blender and make a powder. I buy a 13.5 pound bag at Sams for around $6.00.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:50 PM

Not all baking soda is equal. I have had some Arm & Hammer that is a little rough. My solution was to put it in a blender and make a powder. I buy a 13.5 pound bag at Sams.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:12 PM

I am always slightly amused when people switch to alum crystal to avoid the aluninium in regular deodorants. Alum is potassium aluminium sulfate.

Cd2ff8c68dd1f1d539ad7f0ee94b0421

(1061)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:57 PM

I use Tom's of Maine, an "all-natural" non aluminum deodorant. No 'poo or soap for me, just water. Tried no deodorant, too ... but that won't work for me. I've had no complaints.

9e2180e7bfd688eb52d4f0c536172024

(2004)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:26 PM

Baking soda is too irritating for me to use on my pits. It feels like tiny shards of glass.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:21 PM

I agree, "worried about [your] personal hygiene" is extremely vague. That can range from gossip-mongering to genuine concern. One last thing I can think of is cooking. I know when I cook heavily-scented foods, the odor can get trapped in my hair and clothes, and when I return to work, I may be redolent of bacon or garlic or something. =P Either way, I'm going to maintain that you don't probably do not stink, but it wouldn't hurt to get a second opinion from a trusted friend.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:09 PM

I'd like to see the recipe!

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on February 24, 2011
at 01:59 PM

Not all deodorants/anti-perspirants contain aluminum, though.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 12:56 PM

If you had actually read my post before responding, you should have seen that I do shower, and I do in fact use something which deodorizes me, although not a typical perfumed deodorant.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 12:51 PM

Thanks, Robin, that is a really good point. It would confuse me though, since this is the first complaint I've had since making these changes.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 12:48 PM

Thanks, Dexter. I've been using one of those net sponges for my skin, and I used baking soda on my head initially but had to stop since it made my scalp itchy and flaky.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 12:45 PM

@Robin: Agreed. @Hope: I've concluded that I need more details, too. Is it a recent complaint, what do I smell like, etc? @Kaz: Thank you. The context was the owner of my company took me aside and told me that some people at work were "worried about my personal hygiene". You're right about the cultural influence, and I had considered it, but it was too vague for me to know at this point.

7e038ec055ccb5ddea05e307f8121e4f

on February 24, 2011
at 10:46 AM

I think the context is important as it also shows the real nature of the problem. Children accuse each other of stinking but that can be ignored. Unfortunately some adults say you stink with the motivation of a child and it's hard to know if they can be safely ignored. If a friend tells us with kindness then we can usually assume it's worth paying attention to. A friend told me one time I smelled and it turned out I needed dental work doing. If it was me, I'd ask the friend for more details. If it wasn't a friend then I'd ignore them... or find a friend I could ask about the subject.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on February 24, 2011
at 04:43 AM

For me, the stress of worrying about smelling isn't worth the marginal risk posed by a tiny amount of aluminum in antiperspirant.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:37 AM

"Stinky" is subjective. There are tactful ways to break it to somebody, and then there is remarking on somebody's odor out of malice. I asked the context of the remark, since the intent may vary depending on who said it. By all means, tell me if I smell bad, but don't do it in a hostile manner in order to hurt my feelings. The OP said they "felt really bad" by the comment, so I was sympathizing with them.

E7dc4f2e3998906dd3213973a3c10d50

on February 24, 2011
at 03:26 AM

That's an excellent idea. I have been thinking about trying the no-soap approach. I don't need to do a no-shampoo approach because I have no hair. :D

7e65e7c3794834b3526b77f92cabee55

(214)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:52 AM

If someone really does smell, it can be hard to let them know without causing offense. But isn't it better to find out than carry on in ignorance?

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:33 AM

I use butter regularly, and indulge in ice cream (Hagen-Dasz Five - it's practically paleo!) for dessert fairly often. But I don't drink milk and rarely have yogurt. My detergent is Biokleen, unscented allergen-free stuff @http://biokleenhome.com/products/household/laundry.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:27 AM

I was afraid of being stinky, too. but after so much time without comments I'm inclined to think it couldn't have been that bad. I'm biologically male, and in my early thirties. However I am a little... "gender ambivalent" so perhaps there is a hormonal reason behind that.

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:02 AM

Bravo for posting this. I have not been able to kick antiperspirant/deodorant because I fear this exact thing. One question - are you perhaps female, and perhaps of an age where your hormonal makeup might be changing?

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17 Answers

6
74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:46 AM

I'm sorry that somebody insulted you. That must've been very painful, and it makes me sad that somebody was so tactless to say something like that to you.

What was the context of their remark? Did you ask if you smelled bad, and it was a friend phrasing it delicately? Or was it some boor who used it as an epithet against you? I wouldn't put too much stock in some angry passerby's remark, which is why I ask.

Another consideration is the possibility that if you don't smell like a magazine (full of inserts proffering various colognes) then you must smell offensive to some noses. Our society has a strange tendency to want to pretend that biology doesn't occur, and we're expected to smell like an explosion at a Chanel factory. I'd reckon that if you do a daily rinse to wash off fermenting sweat and oil build-up, you probably do smell fine, and somebody may well have been striking out at you based on some other irritation. (For instance, were you standing nearby on a bus, and they lashed out, feeling claustrophobic?)

Lastly, perhaps it's not YOU that smells, but whatever is going on in your tummy that stinks. You've reported an increase in rumblings and gas; are you flatulent? When was the last time you've been to the dentist? Dental caries may produce an unpleasant odor. Or, maybe, ketosis, which I hear is detectable upon one's breath?

Again, I'm sorry somebody said something hurtful to you, and I commend you for making a switch to a more natural lifestyle. I hope you're able to get things sorted out!

7e65e7c3794834b3526b77f92cabee55

(214)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:52 AM

If someone really does smell, it can be hard to let them know without causing offense. But isn't it better to find out than carry on in ignorance?

7e038ec055ccb5ddea05e307f8121e4f

on February 24, 2011
at 10:46 AM

I think the context is important as it also shows the real nature of the problem. Children accuse each other of stinking but that can be ignored. Unfortunately some adults say you stink with the motivation of a child and it's hard to know if they can be safely ignored. If a friend tells us with kindness then we can usually assume it's worth paying attention to. A friend told me one time I smelled and it turned out I needed dental work doing. If it was me, I'd ask the friend for more details. If it wasn't a friend then I'd ignore them... or find a friend I could ask about the subject.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:37 AM

"Stinky" is subjective. There are tactful ways to break it to somebody, and then there is remarking on somebody's odor out of malice. I asked the context of the remark, since the intent may vary depending on who said it. By all means, tell me if I smell bad, but don't do it in a hostile manner in order to hurt my feelings. The OP said they "felt really bad" by the comment, so I was sympathizing with them.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:21 PM

I agree, "worried about [your] personal hygiene" is extremely vague. That can range from gossip-mongering to genuine concern. One last thing I can think of is cooking. I know when I cook heavily-scented foods, the odor can get trapped in my hair and clothes, and when I return to work, I may be redolent of bacon or garlic or something. =P Either way, I'm going to maintain that you don't probably do not stink, but it wouldn't hurt to get a second opinion from a trusted friend.

C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on February 25, 2011
at 03:53 AM

Where I come from that called being honest and is considered helpful and friendly.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 25, 2011
at 04:45 AM

It seems like we come from different places, Wozza. I still maintain that the intent behind the vocalization is of import -- randomly flinging around insults is one thing; delicately remarking in private is another. We, too, refer to this as "helpful and friendly" as well as a little thing called "tactful". :)

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 12:45 PM

@Robin: Agreed. @Hope: I've concluded that I need more details, too. Is it a recent complaint, what do I smell like, etc? @Kaz: Thank you. The context was the owner of my company took me aside and told me that some people at work were "worried about my personal hygiene". You're right about the cultural influence, and I had considered it, but it was too vague for me to know at this point.

5
07ad8e05f734cb1deec5479dc0e4a194

(315)

on February 25, 2011
at 12:10 AM

OMG Rook, you rock for posting this! First of all, we are all human so on some basic level, no worries about any of this. I'll bet it was just a fluke thing. And, one person may think someone is a bit odiferous, while another person will take a deep sniff and say, "mmmmm, yes, please!"

What happened? Was it a co-worker who said this politely? Or a frenemy who said it meanly? We'll kick their As$.

But, just in case, I'll share some info that may be helpful. I know of a man who showers ever other day or so, and tends to sweat easily just in a normal day to day working environment. He also hates doing laundry, so will try to get at least two wears out his shirts and pants. Some days, this was okay. But other days, there was some body odor. He uses the crystal deodorant and armpits were not a problem. So, if he just launders everything he wears after one time, and showers daily, it is all good. And some days, even if he doesn't it is fine, too. Depending on how warm it is, what we have eaten and so on--every day can be a little different.

It will boost your confidence and assuage your worries if you use your goat milk soap every day, use deodorant every day, launder your clothes after one wear, and sprinkle lavender blossoms and buds in your bureau drawers. Chew on fennel and cloves. Beware of all the flirting that will come your way! Here's my recipe for deodorant: 1/4 cup coconut oil, 1-2 tablespoons of cornstarch, a few drops of aromatic oil, I used cardamom. Blend and apply like a creme.

: )

07ad8e05f734cb1deec5479dc0e4a194

(315)

on February 25, 2011
at 12:12 AM

Oh, duh, to my recipe please add 1 tablespoon of baking soda. sorree!

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:40 PM

Thanks, L.S. It was very politely said by my boss. One thing I am still trying to figure out is when and how this crossed the line from simply being my own smell to being too much of it.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 01, 2011
at 04:21 PM

really good recommendations!

5
Ab19df3ededa28f7bf7daeba8435b205

on February 24, 2011
at 01:54 PM

Rook, this may be the first complaint but think back to your prepaleo days, was there every anyone that stunk...did you tell them? I think people smell all the time but I am around truck drivers and yard workers, they are bound to be sweaty. I dont think I have ever told anyone the have an offending odor but have gone to a Manager (i worked in a Pharmacy for years) before in two different scenerios to have it discussed with the employee because our customers were reporting their smell. Theirs was a lack of hygiene though, not brushing teeth, not cleaning roll under neck and being sweaty in Florida...whew, it was awful and we had to take it daily but I drew the line at the customer noticing.

I would take this as a opportunity to speak with your best friend and look them in the eye and say, BE BRUTAL, I have to know...Please tell me if you can smell my pits, general sweaty smell or what...If you have shared your paleo-ness with others do the same with 3-4...but to be fair to them you really have to stress that they need to be totally and brutally honest in order to help you.

Theresa

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:32 PM

Theresa, I agree, and in fact I deliberately don't complain about my co-worker's body odors whether natural or artificial. But I've had feedback from other people during this time period who have told me that I generally smell "like nothing". And also the fact that my supervisor at work flirted shamelessly with me for my first six months there... I am inclined to take that as feedback and implicit acceptance that I didn't smell *too* bad.

5
6a4fd73b4ae4761eefec8e0d38e6f224

(1008)

on February 24, 2011
at 12:52 PM

For a while now I've been using a homemade deodorant that really does the trick: I can't recall the precise ratios but if you make a paste out of melted coconut oil and baking soda, and a few drops of your favorite essential oil if you like (I used lavender and lemon together), then spread a thin layer on your armpits in morning and maybe dust with baby powder/cornstarch to finish, you will be golden all day. Let me know if you're interested and I'll dig up the "recipe," which I wrote down and stuffed somewhere in my medicine cabinet. :)

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:09 PM

I'd like to see the recipe!

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:33 PM

Thanks, DAC. I'll experiment with this.

6a4fd73b4ae4761eefec8e0d38e6f224

(1008)

on February 25, 2011
at 12:51 AM

Ok - here is what I recorded the last time I made the deodorant: *4 Tbsp baking soda *2 Tbsp melted coconut oil *1 Tbsp cornstarch *[I added 1 Tbsp of an antibacterial pharmaceutical, which you would probably want to leave out and/or replace with extra oil or water.] *essential oil(s) of your choice, if you choose. I can't recall how much I used. Just keep adding drops until it smells nice. :) Blend well and store in a jar or other airtight container. This made enough to last for months. If you ever find it's not spreadable, just wet your finger before you apply it. A little dab'll do ya.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on February 27, 2011
at 04:05 PM

Thank you, DAC!

6a4fd73b4ae4761eefec8e0d38e6f224

(1008)

on February 26, 2011
at 02:28 AM

p.s., I remember reading something - on this thread or another one - about synthetic fabrics, and how they can really make you stink. I have definitely found this to be true. So what you're wearing could be a factor.

E7adfe31507efb7c935f618a829f56d6

(1507)

on June 28, 2012
at 07:32 PM

Just want to add that I started using this recipe after reading it here and it has been AMAZING. i LOVE it and it lasts forever and i do not smell. hooray! and thanks. (I use lavender for the essential oil). oNe thing i noticed is that I sometimes get oily, discolored stains under the armpits on certain materials, anyone else? Do i need to tweak the recipe?

4
7e65e7c3794834b3526b77f92cabee55

(214)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:05 AM

I knew two women - a couple - who went down the same hygiene route as you. One was of Chinese decent. The other was Palestinian.

The Chinese woman had no problem on this regime. Having fewer apocrine glands, she smelled fine. Her partner, on the other hand, ended up with a strong body odor (she didn't have one previously). Her friends begged her to go back to conventional soap.

I don't know what diet they followed other than that they were vegetarians. But the point is simply that different people can respond differently to the same protocols for reasons beyond their control.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 12:51 PM

Thanks, Robin, that is a really good point. It would confuse me though, since this is the first complaint I've had since making these changes.

3
211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on February 24, 2011
at 04:33 AM

In lieu of deodorant, I apply 70% isopropyl alcohol to my armpits every day to kill the germs that cause B.O.

I've been doing this for years and have never received any complaints. Either it's an effective deodorant or everyone's been super polite to me.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on February 24, 2011
at 08:23 PM

I'm not sure I agree. Rubbing alcohol only kills odor-causing bacteria; it's not an anti-perspirant. You'll still sweat but you won't stink.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on February 25, 2011
at 06:29 PM

Perhaps, but that hasn't happened to me yet and I've been doing this every day for the past 7-8 years now.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Theoretically, that's what the crystal stick is supposed to do as well. And likewise, I can't tell if it's effective or if people were just too polite to say anything. But thank you, I will add isopropyl alcohol to my options.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:35 PM

NB&S: no, that's precisely what the crystal stick is meant to do - create an environment where the odor=causing bacteria cannot live while leaving the sweating mechanism unaffected.

Ef4c5b09fdccf73be575d3a0c267fdd9

(2539)

on February 24, 2011
at 08:42 PM

Not to mention that layering your pits with 70% alcohol is going to cause some skin/rash issues in the future.

3
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:09 AM

Generally when someone says stink, they are referring to body odor rather than flatulance. If you are not using a washcloth to scrub your skin to get rid of old dead skin cells...that may be the problem.

I use only baking soda on a coarse washcloth to exfolliate my body while in the shower. When I first went no soap, no shampoo I was in a bathtub and I scrubbed with the washcloth and was absolutely amazed at how much dead skin cells were floating on the water. Baking soda for the hair also.

I use a little baking soda as a natural deodorant in my armpit...which does the trick. I have to use something because after a half day, I begin to reek in my pits, if I go sodaless.

Try the baking soda.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:55 PM

Not all baking soda is equal. I have had some Arm & Hammer that is a little rough. My solution was to put it in a blender and make a powder. I buy a 13.5 pound bag at Sams for around $6.00.

E7dc4f2e3998906dd3213973a3c10d50

on February 24, 2011
at 03:26 AM

That's an excellent idea. I have been thinking about trying the no-soap approach. I don't need to do a no-shampoo approach because I have no hair. :D

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 12:48 PM

Thanks, Dexter. I've been using one of those net sponges for my skin, and I used baking soda on my head initially but had to stop since it made my scalp itchy and flaky.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:50 PM

Not all baking soda is equal. I have had some Arm & Hammer that is a little rough. My solution was to put it in a blender and make a powder. I buy a 13.5 pound bag at Sams.

9e2180e7bfd688eb52d4f0c536172024

(2004)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:26 PM

Baking soda is too irritating for me to use on my pits. It feels like tiny shards of glass.

2
Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 01, 2011
at 04:20 PM

If your body is smelly -- then your lymph system is clogged, period. Cleanse your lymph and keep it clean. This has to do with how your body metabolizes and evacuates what your eat. If you smell at all -- then there is an imbalance in the body. You may not be absorbing or eliminating your foods correctly.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on March 01, 2011
at 04:39 PM

This is silly. Human body odor is caused by bacteria proliferating on the surface of the skin. Everyone sweats and sheds skin, which this bacteria lives on as it produces it's smelly waste. Different people host different bacteria.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 03, 2011
at 01:28 PM

Also beware of mineral deficiencies: Zinc plays a role in many body functions including taste, protection of the teeth, restoration of enzyme function of the immune system and skin, antiseptic, protection of the nervous system, sexual functions, reduction of perspiration and sweaty feet, and cleansing and repair of the lymphatic system. Lymphatic system removes waste and toxins from the body.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 03, 2011
at 01:24 PM

yes... and why does the bacteria proliferate and not remain in balance on the surface of the skin? The kind of bacteria that *should be* on the skin is lactobacillus. Research the lymph.

2
3b5cbb3006f7567b87dd3998ad76ebf8

on February 24, 2011
at 04:36 AM

I've been considering the no poo, no soap route but then, I practically do it anyways. I don't have answers to the causes but I do have some very natural suggestions for smelling better at any time. This works great for everyone, especially women at that time of the month and anyone at anytime who wants an extra something or needs help because they cannot use baking soda (like me). I've practiced aromatherapy for over 20 years so I'm not just blabbing out of school but a drop or two of lavender or peppermint or both rubbed in palms and briskly patted wherever needed can really tone down hormonal times or give you a fresh scent. If your skin is sensitive, add a couple drops of olive oil or jojoba if you have it. There are many other natural scents that can be composed from essential oils (not fragrance oils). I realize this isn't neutral but sometimes I might smell like a skunk. It just isn't my thing. Gorgeous is my thing:) Patch test anything first.

1
C217c925c70a4d1799ff60d10da6a520

on February 25, 2011
at 08:42 PM

I tried a bunch of products, trying to get away from any chemicals, etc. Not much luck in the stink department until I tried Alvera unscented: http://www.iherb.com/Alvera-Aloe-Herbal-All-Natural-Roll-On-Deodorant-3-fl-oz-89-ml/6099?at=1

Works very well for me, and it's cheap.

1
9e2180e7bfd688eb52d4f0c536172024

(2004)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:48 PM

I use mostly baking soda in the shower, with occasional Cetaphil bar soap and hair conditioner. Crystal deoderants don't work for me. Neither do Tom's brand deoderants or milk of magnesia (another 'natural' remedy) or lavendar essential oil. Tried them all. I don't reek using them, but by the end of the day, I'm starting to ripen. Therefore I went back to my conventional deoderant. It's not worth the worry, and it's not convenient for me to wash my pits in the middle of the workday to reapply these less effective products.

You'll get it sorted out. Don't forget about your clothes either -- whatever steps you take, you may want to launder or dry clean any work clothes that have been worn recently. I had a friend in HR who told me she once had to speak with a coworker about an odor problem. It turned out he was showering and dressing for work, then putting coveralls over his work clothes before feeding his goats. His goaty coveralls were contaminating his whole person, but he couldn't smell it.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:43 PM

Ironically, everyone at my workplace smells like acrylic monomer to everyone else in the world as soon as we leave, and none of us notice it because we're so used to being contaminated!

1
Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:10 PM

The "crystal sticks" are overly commercialized, IMO. Yes, they work, but they're overly packaged and expensive. Pick up an alum block from a men's grooming store. Not only does it help tighten the pores on your face after a shave, but it doubles as an unscented deodorant that lasts forever.

Before you apply this types of crystal, though, make sure to run it under cold water first. Simply rubbing it against your skin isn't going to do a thing.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:12 PM

I am always slightly amused when people switch to alum crystal to avoid the aluninium in regular deodorants. Alum is potassium aluminium sulfate.

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on February 24, 2011
at 03:56 PM

Supposedly there's a difference; aluminum chlorohydrate and/or aluminum zirconium are what's in most deodorants, and that's where the link to Alzheimer's is present. Potassium aluminum sulfate occurs naturally, and it seems that the molecules are too large to be absorbed through the skin. Further, ammonium alum blocks are synthetic, and may warrant further investigation. The consensus seems to be that potassium aluminium sulphate-based alum blocks are okay, however.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on February 25, 2011
at 12:17 AM

I agree, however most people don't seem to be aware of that.

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:19 AM

Are you eating any dairy?

Is your laundry detergent Paleo? I mean, are using still using standard laundry products?

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 02:33 AM

I use butter regularly, and indulge in ice cream (Hagen-Dasz Five - it's practically paleo!) for dessert fairly often. But I don't drink milk and rarely have yogurt. My detergent is Biokleen, unscented allergen-free stuff @http://biokleenhome.com/products/household/laundry.

691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on March 01, 2011
at 04:56 PM

hehe, hagan dasz five is not paleo... id cut out that sugar before i cut out deodorant

0
691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on March 01, 2011
at 04:58 PM

I use Aubrey Organics Men's Stock. They have a few other styles like a Calendula based one that smells less 'manly'. It's basically alcohol and some herbs sprayed on. It seems to work all day and even during gym work outs. Has worked way better than Tom's for me and seems to be even more natural.

0
9b1da5c61c41bb93afb668f9ab3bc76a

(422)

on February 27, 2011
at 07:01 AM

Sometimes it also seems to be one persons nose vs. one persons body. If my husband doesn't shower for a few days, I think he smells like unshowered man, but it doesn't smell offensive to me. I've met other guys though that shower, use deodorant, standard hygiene and they just stink to me!

As you said it's someone you're in contact with regularly, I'd suggest one of the Toms of Maine products, at least for work. My mom actually used to buy me their deodorants when I was a kid (my family has always been anti aluminum, this was like 15 years ago!) but I had overactive sweat glands and would get made fun of for how much I perspired, so I went to the anti-perspirant anyway...and look at me now, waiting till mine gets all used up so I can switch back! XD

0
C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on February 25, 2011
at 03:55 AM

I don't rub chemicals into my skin. I'm pretty sure I don't smell. What I do, and I think this is very important, is make sure I only wear natural fibres eg cotton or wool. Have you by any chance started wearing polyester lately?

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 25, 2011
at 08:41 PM

No, not really. I prefer natural fibers, too.

-8
99ac392257e444e014be6d4da6a900e4

(1036)

on February 24, 2011
at 05:12 AM

Take a shower. Use deodorant. Problem solved.

C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on February 24, 2011
at 12:56 PM

If you had actually read my post before responding, you should have seen that I do shower, and I do in fact use something which deodorizes me, although not a typical perfumed deodorant.

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