1

votes

Is slow cooking "paleo"

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 16, 2012 at 6:05 AM

Braising, Roasing, slow cooking for 12-36 hours in a slow cooker... divine oh yes.. but paleo? Primal? Did our hunter/gatherer ancestors regularly practice extracting flavor and nutrition via long slow cooking?

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 16, 2012
at 04:54 PM

I bet there are ^

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 16, 2012
at 04:53 PM

Exactly ^......

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on October 16, 2012
at 04:51 PM

it is the only way to cut cheaper and tougher cuts of meat. cooking on coals under leaves has been going on since man started cooking.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on October 16, 2012
at 02:54 PM

Well doesn't that depend on the degree to which the cooking process influences the nutritional profile of the meal?

Ae79a4cc9f9b155ded65f10ab8395a6d

(229)

on October 16, 2012
at 06:50 AM

I have wondered if there were extremists out there. Like an Amish Paleo type thing :)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on October 16, 2012
at 06:46 AM

Exactly, hot rocks, leaves, buried in the ground, is very common in paleo archeaology and more recent tribal cultures. Often this was more common than direct fire. So yes, slow cooking is very paleo.

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9 Answers

5
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on October 16, 2012
at 06:53 AM

I think of Hawaii and the various polynesian cultures cooking their pork in this fashion (hole in the ground, lava rocks). Having a ceremony to dig up your food from the "ground oven" is about as paleo as it gets!!

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

4
42cd0feeeda5fa2e2fe1c4fd8255073a

on October 16, 2012
at 06:31 AM

I think you'll find a lot of native tribes actually used this 'slow-cook' method by virtue of their underground ovens. Technology is a blessing of the modern age (depending of course) and so whilst the slow cooker may not replicate this method, I'd say it's more primal than the microwave at least in its method and in the sense it's far more economical to power up.

If you are that hardcore, by all means though, go dig a hole. You'll have my admiration!

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on October 16, 2012
at 06:46 AM

Exactly, hot rocks, leaves, buried in the ground, is very common in paleo archeaology and more recent tribal cultures. Often this was more common than direct fire. So yes, slow cooking is very paleo.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 16, 2012
at 04:54 PM

I bet there are ^

Ae79a4cc9f9b155ded65f10ab8395a6d

(229)

on October 16, 2012
at 06:50 AM

I have wondered if there were extremists out there. Like an Amish Paleo type thing :)

2
Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 16, 2012
at 06:24 AM

What we are interested in, is the end nutrition, not the cooking process

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 16, 2012
at 04:53 PM

Exactly ^......

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on October 16, 2012
at 02:54 PM

Well doesn't that depend on the degree to which the cooking process influences the nutritional profile of the meal?

1
3bc294cb7745a5e99612ff886ca00101

(1186)

on October 16, 2012
at 03:10 PM

I agree, not only is slow-cooking used by hunter-gatherers and known to be an ancient cooking technique, but in terms of end nutrition it is beneficial to use a slow moist heat method over charring on a direct fire-- which is said to destroy nutrients and create carcinogens... mmm, delicious flame-broiled carcinogens. I don't worry too much about that, I just think it is better to eat more of your meats moist-heat cooked rather than high-heat fried, broiled, BBQed, etc.

Or just plain raw....

0
F57eeb5680b8d265fe9555e2f4fdefee

on February 23, 2014
at 03:39 PM

I use the slow cooker for a lot of my meals, i definitely recommend it - cook tasty paleo meals in batch saves time

0
8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on January 13, 2014
at 07:07 AM

Of course. There is lots and lots of paleolithic evidence of cooking with hot rocks and leaves. Heaps. Europe particularly. And there's spit roasting. I tend to think this was more common that fast cooking.

0
D6a797f8af9da19ef45bb285c1eed42e

on January 13, 2014
at 06:44 AM

@Alvaro @MasterVycen

I'm interested in this topic too as I've been using a lot of paleo slow cooker recipes.

tl;dr

Slow cooking for long periods even at low temperatures will probably cause some nutrient loss, but level of nutrient loss depends on the specific nutrient. On the plus side, because the slow cooker is a closed container, much or some nutrients lost from food will be trapped into the surrounding liquid.

So sounds like as long as we drink the broth / juices from the slow cooked foods along with everything else, it should be mostly fine (given that the benefits are greater than the losses, at least imho).

0
Af9e23fd927bacc1ad31e83db69f454e

on January 12, 2014
at 09:57 PM

does anyone know of any science showing how much nutrition is lost when cooking on low heat for like 9 hours? Sure, high heat destroys many nutrients, but I've heard heat for extended periods of time might destroy nutrients even more.

0
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on October 16, 2012
at 04:50 PM

We are nothing like our ancestors, if the food is real, go for it.

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