2

votes

How long can I slow cook beef?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 20, 2013 at 11:44 PM

Does there come a point where you can overslowcook beef? I've heard of people running a crockpot for days but will there come a point where the monounsaturated or saturated fats in beef will go rancid? Could you in theory safe slow cook beef for several days? What about a week, when is too much and why?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 21, 2013
at 06:02 PM

bacteria grows between 40°F and 140°F -- Beef fat oxidizes near 400°F. So if you keep it between 140°F and 400°F you should be fine. But the meat will dry out and get stringy.

0775549e75987e08e0ca18585a757433

(168)

on May 21, 2013
at 11:10 AM

I just want to make sure I don't get sick or something from slow cooking my food for too long.

Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

(7370)

on May 21, 2013
at 03:13 AM

If you boil it for a long time, it will burn. If it simmers, the chances of it burning will greatly reduce. With stews, soup, broths, it's better a long slow simmer.

0775549e75987e08e0ca18585a757433

(168)

on May 21, 2013
at 01:09 AM

Thank you crowbar. You said "As long as it simmers (not a rapid boil) it should be fine". Why did you make that distinction? Would your advice change if the water was boiling, like in a big pot on a stove for instance?

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5 Answers

2
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on May 21, 2013
at 12:47 AM

As long as it simmers (not a rapid boil) it should be fine, although I don't like the taste of beef boiled that long. When I make bone broth, I don't cook beef in it, but rather use smaller amounts of it afterwards to make small amounts of beef and veggies. But, no, you could keep a broth going indefintely, adding water and ingredients as you eat it to replace it. At a simmer, (low on a crock pot) no bacteria would grow.

0775549e75987e08e0ca18585a757433

(168)

on May 21, 2013
at 01:09 AM

Thank you crowbar. You said "As long as it simmers (not a rapid boil) it should be fine". Why did you make that distinction? Would your advice change if the water was boiling, like in a big pot on a stove for instance?

Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

(7370)

on May 21, 2013
at 03:13 AM

If you boil it for a long time, it will burn. If it simmers, the chances of it burning will greatly reduce. With stews, soup, broths, it's better a long slow simmer.

1
705e66484ed64fe8e188123de398413e

on May 21, 2013
at 04:40 PM

As long as the beef remains at a warm enough temperature that bacteria don't start growing, you can cook it forever. There is a point of diminishing returns though if you want it to taste good. At a certain point (depends on cut of meat and temperature) you're just making broth instead of slow-cooked beef.

The leaner the cut of meat, the sooner it hits the point of diminishing returns.

0
F895470b4e6e0bc7e54707ce32aa033d

on May 21, 2013
at 03:12 PM

Have you looked into SousVide cooking? This is a process where you vacuum pack the meat and place it into a water oven at 150 to 180 way below boil for many hours. Some professional chefs will let it cook for 12 hours or more.

0
C6032b723b12cf0073ec6d22c5f4e7ae

on May 21, 2013
at 02:59 PM

I only slow cook beef for 6 hours, at which point I remove the meat and return the bones to the pot... I'm unsure why you'd want to go longer.

0
34a31e6e59ee73ac7ddfd96c3e653919

on May 21, 2013
at 03:46 AM

whats your reasoning behind wanting to do this?

0775549e75987e08e0ca18585a757433

(168)

on May 21, 2013
at 11:10 AM

I just want to make sure I don't get sick or something from slow cooking my food for too long.

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