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Why Do I Wake Up Many Times A Night?

Answered on October 10, 2013
Created October 09, 2013 at 9:21 PM

Hi,

After a little help here..

I've always thought it was normal to wake up a few times a night, roll over, and quickly fall back to sleep.

I've learnt that it's not!

Last night was a classic example of this: I woke up, rolled over and went back to sleep around 8-10 times.

What on Earth could be causing this?

I'm a male, 28 years of age, not at all overweight.

A few thoughts of mine:

* I don't snore

* I don't have any of the traits that go with sleep apnea (overweight, smoker, old age, etc)

* Could thyroid hormones be playing a part?

* My room is dark and quiet

* I sleep on my side just as Esther Gokhale recommends

* I've tried eating more carbs for dinner. I try to eat 3 hours before bedtime

* Very occasionally I have a night where I wake up maybe only once.

* I don't feel I'm carrying lots of stress

* I exercise during the day

* I'm tired when I go to bed and fall asleep easily.

* I obviously don't feel refreshed when I wake up!

Any thoughts are appreciated!

Rick

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 10, 2013
at 07:10 PM

Are you sleeping alone?

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 10, 2013
at 04:14 AM

now i come to think about the 'normal' for light sleepers, it could be waking at the end of a sleep cycle. if we say a sleep cycle is approx 90 mins (varies from person to person i think), then worse case might mean waking maybe 4 or 5 times per night at most.

which does not at all match with your experience. and that would tie in with your unrested/unrefreshed feeling the next day, because you could be waking at any point during a sleep cycle & probably not completing many, if any, full sleep cycles.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 10, 2013
at 04:00 AM

good points. if your waking unrested/unrefreshed, then you are...waking unrested/unrefreshed (ie. not good).

4cde0c31df5c3ace8a37cd9732ac9cb2

(0)

on October 10, 2013
at 02:48 AM

Hi Jenjen,

Yeh I'll look into getting a sleep study done.

I'm definitely eating enough calories: 2500-3000+ a day. I got my blood sugar levels checked a few weeks ago, everything came back as fine.

I'll look into LPR too, but I'm pretty sure I don't have that going on.

Thanks for the reply.

4cde0c31df5c3ace8a37cd9732ac9cb2

(0)

on October 10, 2013
at 02:47 AM

Daz, I don't have a link or a ref to reinforce or prove that it is not normal. But I don't really think one needs that. I don't think I should be waking up for no apparent reason when there is no noise or anything like that around (if I was even a 'light sleeper'). Waking up feeling unrested and tired may be 'normal' in that a lot of people feel the same way, but I don't think it is 'natural'.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 09, 2013
at 09:50 PM

What have you learnt that says it is not normal, got a link or a ref etc

I always thought it was normal as well...in 'light sleepers', than again maybe 'light sleepers' are not normal

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5 Answers

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on October 10, 2013
at 10:11 PM

It could be any number of things. One thing that might help is to get an audio recorder, if you have an android phone, there should be one built in; set your phone next to your bed, and record it at the highest quality, then download it on your computer and use something like audacity to look at the audio wave patterns and click on areas where you see silence turn to noise. Maybe you can get a clue of what it is. One thing to look for is periods of silence, then a choking/snoring sound - that would be sleep apnea.

0
Medium avatar

on October 10, 2013
at 07:47 PM

When competing i fitness I sometimes ha to drop calories quite a lot for a few weeks before a competition. When doing so I always woke up a couple of times at night. It's the body's reaction to that you need to go hunt for food. A sign of being too low on calories and staying that low for longer than a short time will slow down your metabolism.

There can of course be a bunch of other reasons as explained by others above. But try to increase the calories a little for a few days and see if it gets better. Otherwise you could try to take a melatonin pill 30 min before bedtime unless you don't prefer having it checked up by a doc right away.

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on October 10, 2013
at 04:49 PM

What happens if you sleep somewhere else? If you sleep better then environment issues, mattress, allergies, etc. can be at fault.

How about trying completely different nutrients during the day or reversing and eating carbs only in the morning, fasting. Run your daily meals through Paleotrack or Cron O Meter to see what you might b missing in terms of vit/minerals.

Exercise before bed, maybe tiring yourself out might be the ticket.

Are you one of those people who goes to bed running the days events and tomorrows plans in your head?

I'd just go crazy and try all sorts of different things, taking notes daily on what you did.

0
7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on October 10, 2013
at 03:39 PM

gonna take a shot at this one, even though i have no idea how to fix this.

like jenjen said if you go hypoglycemic at night it can wake you up, from personal experience you could probably test this by 1. if you wake up your somewhat tired, 2. after you eat upon waking your tired enough to go back to sleep.(may be a good way of testing without glucose tester/strips)

i know there are also apps for your phone that monitor when you toss/turn(move) ie when your in light sleep, if your doing this all night maybe you have sleep apnea/ environmental disturbance thats constantly waking you up.

ive also seen people mention issues like this correcting after they stopped blue light exposure a few hours before sleep, i would imagine this has something to do with melatonin production.... not sure how it would work though.

some things u may try, make sure your room is blacked out.(not even little leds/alarmclock) no external noises, making sure room is cool,(temp drop helps u sleep)on the blood sugar front you may try avoiding carbs close to bed and instead eating fats/proteins(foods that wont spike/drop your blood sugar)(excess insulin)(would like others to weigh in on this one)

the one that seems most likely to me is the bloodsugar/calories, with everything else a distant second.

although like i said this is all speculation and i have no clue about this, hope someone has more info/details as this seems like a pretty common/bad issue.(ZzZzZzzZzzzz)

0
2a6025992746ff6cd4ffb6ccf0aa03fc

on October 10, 2013
at 02:16 AM

Could still be sleep apnea even if you aren't overweight. Maybe get it checked.

Are you eating enough calories? Hunger can keep you awake or wake you up.

Are you hypoglycemic? Low blood sugar can do same as above.

Also GERD or LPR ("silent acid reflux") can wake you up.

4cde0c31df5c3ace8a37cd9732ac9cb2

(0)

on October 10, 2013
at 02:48 AM

Hi Jenjen,

Yeh I'll look into getting a sleep study done.

I'm definitely eating enough calories: 2500-3000+ a day. I got my blood sugar levels checked a few weeks ago, everything came back as fine.

I'll look into LPR too, but I'm pretty sure I don't have that going on.

Thanks for the reply.

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