1

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Weird sleep problem

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 26, 2010 at 5:39 PM

I tried searching for this problem but couldn't really get to anything, so posting here. Whenever I am very excited or go to a new place, I cannot fall asleep. But that sounds normal, however sometimes, when I am very much involved in doing something and do it for several hours, and when I sleep, I can fall asleep but I keep getting in dreams what I have been doing. For example, if I play a computer game, that keeps repeating in the dreams. Some times I end up getting facebook or even math in my dreams. The same thing just repeats on and on and on and its very frustrating. As a result I keep waking up many times.

I never got it diagnosed (never saw a point) but I feel like I have symptoms of ADD. Most of the time I cannot concentrate well, keep switching around and stuff like that but when I am into something, the concentration is intense. That may be great, but I can't sleep well that night. Yesterday was one of them.

I know drinking chamomile tea or relaxing might help, but I never know when this thing is going to happen.

A18481e4b0edc283d5a84a2321001c79

(50)

on February 18, 2011
at 11:30 PM

That happens to me as well. Its like my brain just won't shut off. Most of the time though, I can't even calm down (mentally) enough to even get to sleep. I've started taking melatonin or valerian an hour or so before bedtime and that has helped me a lot.

A18481e4b0edc283d5a84a2321001c79

(50)

on February 18, 2011
at 11:29 PM

That happens to me as well. Its like my brain just won't shut off.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on December 27, 2010
at 01:58 PM

I hate that feeling of deja vu! It's like I just *did* that!

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on December 27, 2010
at 01:56 PM

I don't get the excited about something and can't sleep thing, but I very much dream about the last thing I've been doing quite often. Or if I have been watching a lot of a particular television program, my dreams will be of that program, like I'm inserted in it. Sometimes it's fun. Sometimes, it's not.

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on December 27, 2010
at 03:20 AM

I am completely gluten-free.

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on December 27, 2010
at 01:38 AM

ha, yeah sometimes I get too excited and can't sleep many days. Sux sometimes..

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on December 27, 2010
at 01:37 AM

I now feel its pretty tough to keep traveling! Good luck!!

E46d4f7e35e46ee4e8211ab4bc852023

(1510)

on December 27, 2010
at 12:51 AM

Wow... it's like you just looked into my brain and described everything you saw. I always assumed the inability to sleep in a new place is from an adrenaline high. I can go an entire week of not being able to sleep if I'm traveling for an extended period of time.

A0b8c4cc369f93ee987ce15b1bf323fe

on December 26, 2010
at 06:50 PM

i've experienced similar dreams. at times they almost seem like an anxiety attack. i don't have them frequently, and i'm not sure what provokes them, but i am interested to hear more about this

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12 Answers

3
5f0158c23fcb5636e57b4ce097784da0

(1386)

on December 26, 2010
at 08:42 PM

magnesium orotate, glycinate or citrate plus GABA never fail to get me in a nice relaxed and sleepy state and i never wake up during the night. give it a try.

(btw, it's completely normal that your brain "rehearses" challenging stuff during the night - that's how your brain develops and improves)

2
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on December 26, 2010
at 11:43 PM

What you are describing is so normal and common, I don't think it's a problem at all. Try to stop doing things that get you wound up for a few hours before bed. Regarding nights before big-days, there's nothing really to do. As you get older, there will be fewer big-days as some of the newness of life wears off a bit.

2
25ed4acfb632d928507f8673bcb0923a

(650)

on December 26, 2010
at 10:31 PM

Memories for the day's events, sometimes called day-residue, like playing video games are probably stored in the brain differently than more consciously learned material. Robert Stickgold, a sleep researcher at Harvard, once had anterograde amnesics (they can't form new explicit memories) play Tetris for 4 hours a day. Even though they never explicitly recalled having played Tetris, when they were asked about their dreams (especially the hypnagogic imagery during pre-sleep) they recalled a lot of Tetris-like imagery.

2
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on December 26, 2010
at 10:00 PM

You may want to try a melatonin supplement to help you fall asleep. I travel across the country and have to use it to fall asleep when the time zone changes.

i too dream about whatever I've been doing. I've had some interesting dreams about The Office.

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on December 27, 2010
at 01:37 AM

I now feel its pretty tough to keep traveling! Good luck!!

2
04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

on December 26, 2010
at 06:01 PM

I think all things electronic or mind stimulating like math, are not helpful before bed. The author of "Lights Out, Sleep, Sugar and Survival," by T.S. Wiley does a pretty good job in explaining why. I found that book fascinating.

I have added F.lux to my computer. F.lux fixes this: it makes the color of your computer's display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day which changes the. http://www.stereopsis.com/flux/ (Might help with late night internet use)

I have had sleep problems for a long time so I am always researching this, but sounds like this is not a chronic problem.

Last night I watched on TV (against my better judgement) a show called "Container Wars," and all my dreams were relating to thrift store junk. errrr! Didn't help my sleep and I woke up a lot.

It doesn't hurt to drink the chamomile tea before bed just in case, I do!

1
Fb17c9dcae8790443cc5fb85f47d10a7

(118)

on December 31, 2010
at 09:53 PM

Yes, you need to relax before bed.

The new place/anticipation thing is normal, I think. If I have to get up specially early for something, I always sleep badly (in fits and starts!) the night before.

Sleep specialists all recommend not doing things that are stimulating for the last couple of hours before bed. I usually have dinner, do some crosswords or puzzles (I find it relaxing), and go to bed with my last decaff and cream with 1/4 teaspoon honey in it. And my daily treat of 1 square of 70% dark chocolate is eaten then too. I read (no horror or thrillers - defeats the purpose) until I feel sleepy and usually have no trouble dropping off.

1
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on December 26, 2010
at 09:43 PM

I've had this happen. When I had some boring stressful task at work, I've sometimes come home and dreamt that I was still doing it. Ick! Or sometimes in the morning, I'd dream I got up, took a shower, got ready for work, etc. Only to later wake up and realize I had to do it all over gain for real! GAH!

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on December 27, 2010
at 01:58 PM

I hate that feeling of deja vu! It's like I just *did* that!

1
76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on December 26, 2010
at 06:41 PM

Try meditation before you go to bed. Like, really learn how to meditate for relaxation. Focus just on your breath - inhaling and exhaling. Try counting each breath. The goal with meditation is to eventually just focus on "nothing", letting your conscious mind's thoughts of math and facebook just pass without dwelling on them.

Might sound a tad too Buddhist at first, but it really helps. I try to meditate every night before I sleep, especially if I've had a day filled with craziness.

Good luck!

0
Fe87afa634afe26f4f6fd956abe0b46a

(565)

on April 20, 2011
at 01:26 PM

Ditch the internet before bed! The type of light emitted from the screen disrupts the body's circadian rhythm. It pretty much destroys normal melatonin production and thus, normal sleep patterns. Cut out the TV, and especially the computer an hour before bed and things will vasty improve.

A melatonin supplement can also help immensely. You can start with 1mg. Just take it and read a good book, or just lay back and relax.

0
B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on January 02, 2011
at 12:36 AM

This sounds very similar to hypnagogia, except that it's as you're falling alseep not during sleep. Read this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnagogia#Tetris_effect

0
03d5a967b935e1e8ef202f313467878f

(485)

on January 01, 2011
at 08:04 PM

Well, in a sense your brain is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. Part of the reason we sleep is so the brain can work on things for us that we devoted a lot of attention to during the day. Tetris is the perfect example...if you play Tetris a lot (because we all get sucked in and spend hours doing it) then your brain assumes it's important and your dreams at night are a time when your brain practices for you. That's why you "sleep on it" and are best at certain tasks or more certain about an idea after sleeping. There have been studies done on rats that proved that they were dreaming about going through a maze that they had been placed in during the day. Your brain does the same. But your brain is doing it more than needed and about things that don't really matter. You have to control for that by avoiding the TV/computer, etc. before bed. Or just get really good at Facebook math games. :)

0
93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on December 27, 2010
at 03:19 AM

Ivan,

Have you removed any and all gluten or gluten-like substances from your diet? It is likely doing so will help specifically with your sleep issues. They certainly did for me, which was very similar.

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on December 27, 2010
at 03:20 AM

I am completely gluten-free.

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