8

votes

Sleeping in a hammock?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 26, 2010 at 3:13 PM

Since I move a lot, getting a bed is always an annoyance. Getting a huge mattress delivered is expensive...clearly people were able to survive without such things for millions of years. I was thinking of buying something more portable...like a hammock. Has anyone ever tried sleeping on one long-term? I know they are used often in the Amazon and were also used by many on tall ships, historically.

25329057c9d5f6364a74787c8c2302e7

(806)

on June 14, 2011
at 06:04 PM

I have a 'mayan hammock' and it is very comfortable to sleep at the diagonal. You look like dracula in his coffin and there isn't much ability to shift and move, but it is comfortable nonetheless. Biggest problem is temperature- you lose a good deal of heat out the bottom. Considering all the benefits of cold therapy though, that may be more a feature for some!

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 13, 2011
at 06:02 PM

funny, I bought a fold-up portable cot so I can sleep at the office and I sleep better on that than my expensive home mattress.

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on January 18, 2011
at 01:51 PM

This sounds amazingly comforting.

B289fd8670257e77badb0c77709f8572

(10)

on June 27, 2010
at 02:03 AM

I sleep in one like this when I'm backpacking: http://hennessyhammock.com/specs-explorerUL.html

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8 Answers

7
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 26, 2010
at 11:20 PM

Don't know about a hammock but if this is all because you move a lot why not get a futon? Or just do like they do in japan: get a thin cushion mat (think yoga mat) and then put your bed sheet on top and presto, bed. This is all on the floor of course. I slept like this in japan for 5 years with no problems. In fact, reading this thread is making me question beds in general. I'm not a paleo re-enactor but none the less I'm sure we've spent more time as a species sans-bed than with-bed.

5
59c5bdfff68fa6827c3294d7715de37e

on June 26, 2010
at 03:42 PM

I slept on one in the Amazon for a few sleepless nights. I generally sleep on my stomach, which does not work at all in a hammock. I didn't find sleeping on my side comfortable at all either. Everyone else (the back sleepers) slept fine. Interestingly, proper hammock-sleeping technique is sleeping at a diagonal across the hammock -- it reduces the C-curve that you get with your body parallel to the hammock.

25329057c9d5f6364a74787c8c2302e7

(806)

on June 14, 2011
at 06:04 PM

I have a 'mayan hammock' and it is very comfortable to sleep at the diagonal. You look like dracula in his coffin and there isn't much ability to shift and move, but it is comfortable nonetheless. Biggest problem is temperature- you lose a good deal of heat out the bottom. Considering all the benefits of cold therapy though, that may be more a feature for some!

4
D8691a1cee39ea420a36b163d4a4042b

(404)

on June 27, 2010
at 04:17 PM

I slept in a hammock for three months. For me the key is to use a large yucatan hammock. It should be large enough to lie In sideways with enough extra to come up and over head and toes and meet in the middle. In yucatan it's called tamano matrimonial

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on January 18, 2011
at 01:51 PM

This sounds amazingly comforting.

2
145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

on June 26, 2010
at 08:25 PM

I slept for some years on a Coleman air mattress (the kind you take camping). NOTHING, not even my thousand-dollar-plus memory foam mattress even comes close. Ever so often it will need to be replaced because it will eventually spring a leak. But you can certainly let the air out of it and move it around without much trouble at all.

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 13, 2011
at 06:02 PM

funny, I bought a fold-up portable cot so I can sleep at the office and I sleep better on that than my expensive home mattress.

1
Medium avatar

on January 18, 2011
at 04:43 AM

look into getting an Eagle's Nest Outfitters or Hennessey hammock, preferably one that hold two people so you have more room. These hammocks pack really small, don't weight much, hold lots of weight, come with warranties, dry quickly and are soft so you could sleep in them without a pad under you and not get marks on your skin like from a rope hammock.

The important thing about sleeping in a hammock is to set up the hammock so that it is taught and stretches downward when you get into it. Then, situate yourself at an angle, like 45 degrees to the hammock. This way you lay as flat as possible. Hammocks don't work that well for stomach sleepers but I've slept on my side in one.

1
D5db204527668aa712504995c0f8f96f

(551)

on June 26, 2010
at 10:20 PM

While i love being in a hammock on a summer day because it's just relaxing, i would not be able to sleep in it. I could sleep on the ground (did it quite often in the past) or on a thin mattress/camping air mattress tho.

You would have to try it out and see for yourself.

1
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on June 26, 2010
at 09:11 PM

Wow- where are the guys (crashed on the sofa?) I don't cook in a kettle over an open fire- so I will choice a good bed. I have a hammock in the backyard and bring one on camping trips to nap in but curling up in bed with my lady is worth including in my 20 per cent if I have too.

1
A231170e329756974c79cd8d2116351c

(103)

on June 26, 2010
at 04:24 PM

I always found hammocks uncomfortable myself (really). Maybe it just takes some getting used to. Weirdly enough I find sleeping on a mat on the floor comfortable if I leave a pillow under my knees.

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