1

votes

sleep consistency

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 06, 2011 at 4:30 AM

With all other 'sleep hygiene' issues sorted out, how important is it to wake up at roughly the same time each day? With my current schedule, I wake up at 6am mondays and wednesdays and 730 on tues/thurs.

I always eat a big breakfast (usually meat) within 30-45 mins of rising so is my internal signaling clock being confused slightly by going back and forth with my rising time?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I haven't found it to be true either. No links handy but just about everything in "Lights out" by TS Wiley will agree,

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 17, 2011
at 02:46 PM

I am very similar to you in this respect

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 20, 2011
at 12:12 PM

If your getting 8 hours of sleep during night time and wake up refreshed my comment holds true imo.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 20, 2011
at 12:08 PM

links? Everything I've seen says the overall amount of time you sleep is the main factor.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 20, 2011
at 12:02 PM

Not true. This ignores the last 50 yrs of sleep research on cicadian clocks.

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5 Answers

1
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 20, 2011
at 11:25 AM

It doesn't matter when you wake up as long as you get ~8 hours of sleep

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 20, 2011
at 12:02 PM

Not true. This ignores the last 50 yrs of sleep research on cicadian clocks.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 20, 2011
at 12:12 PM

If your getting 8 hours of sleep during night time and wake up refreshed my comment holds true imo.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I haven't found it to be true either. No links handy but just about everything in "Lights out" by TS Wiley will agree,

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 20, 2011
at 12:08 PM

links? Everything I've seen says the overall amount of time you sleep is the main factor.

1
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 06, 2011
at 04:39 AM

If you are able to wake up a few minutes before the alarm goes off then you are likely OK. Also make sure you are getting 7.5 hours of sleep or more...

0
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 16, 2011
at 12:12 AM

I agree with Eric that a well-rested person can frequently wake up at the desired time without an alarm.

However, I will also build on Quilt's mention of circadian rhythms. When I was still working, I hated going to bed and I hated getting up. I was always out of sync with the clocks.

Now that I don't work, I get sleepy about 8-9 hours before first light (the time on the clock varies as the lengths of days change) and I wake up spontaneously/gradually as first light begins to come in through the skylight. It took me a while to figure out that the time of my sleepiness relates directly to time of first light; I was puzzled as to why it wasn't the same "time" every night.

It's a totally natural process and I routinely get 7-8 hours of continuous sleep. How many old ladies can say that?

0
Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 15, 2011
at 11:32 PM

With all other 'sleep hygiene' issues sorted out, how important is it to wake up at roughly the same time each day? With my current schedule, I wake up at 6am mondays and wednesdays and 730 on tues/thurs.

How can you wake up at different times if all your sleep hygiene issues are sorted out? I can only assume you're not waking naturally, which, yeah, may be a bit of a drag.

0
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 17, 2011
at 02:26 PM

I can't answer from a scientific basis, but I've found that having relatively regular sleep and wake times helps me maintain better quality sleep. I don't usually use an alarm to wake, and find that I wake, naturally and refreshed, about 5-10 minutes before an alarm would have gone off.

I've noticed, for myself, that ~30 minutes here or there doesn't seem to matter to the overall quality or quantity of my sleep -- but more than a half hour -- and certainly an hour and a half difference does interfere greatly with my ability to sleep well.

I find that, on the days that I end up going to sleep more than 30 minutes after my usual bedtime, I miss my "sleep window" and it takes me longer to fall asleep, as well as having more restless sleep with more waking and tossing and turning. On the days when I have to wake substantially earlier than my usual wake time, regardless of whether I've planned and tried to go to sleep earlier to assure that I have enough sleep time, I am restless and wake often during the night--probably from worrying about whether I'll hear the alarm or will wake up too late or whatever.

After maintaining a consistent sleep pattern for almost 2 years, I have become physically unable to sleep later than my "usual" wake time by more than a few minutes -- my body wakes naturally, and I am -wide- awake... no chance of copping extra snooze, even if I went to sleep after my planned bed-time (on top of the poor sleep from the delayed bedtime), so I tend to mess with my rest as little as possible.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 17, 2011
at 02:46 PM

I am very similar to you in this respect

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