1

votes

I cannot get out of bed ... what's up?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 23, 2010 at 11:59 AM

I know the easy answer to this question (get more sleep, make it regular, lessen stress), sure. But the inability to get up without hitting snooze 4 times is really bad the last few months. I get around 7.5 hours a night and this has not been such a problem for me in the past - what I mean is, I used to be able to get up even without the right amount of sleep (regardless of whether I should be doing that).

Diet got a little off track after T-giving as I was sick and just kind of got lazy, but it's back up and running again. Am I just more sensitive to the daylight cycles now that I've been paying more attention and living more Paleo? I like to work out in the morning (because I tend to blow it off at night) so I really would like to have an easier time waking up. What gives?

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on March 21, 2011
at 01:57 PM

I love naps. 8)

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on March 21, 2011
at 01:57 PM

Yup, this was my problem. The snooze was just a habit. Set your alarm for the time you KNOW you'll get up. Getting up with the alarm will start to become a habit.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on March 20, 2011
at 09:46 PM

Anonymous downvote. Awesome.

48a30b4022fff51f4a1b817dbb1ebb84

(90)

on January 11, 2011
at 04:51 PM

Great advice. Thanks.

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on December 23, 2010
at 08:06 PM

Exact same problem here, more pronounced in the winter!

21084e275703e9a3909dafa28e5d29b5

(1103)

on December 23, 2010
at 02:10 PM

I agree, I know for me I am more sensative to the dark winter days. It could also be the cold? I'm seeing that I "need" more like 8-9 hours of sleep instead of 7. I think it might be a combination of dark mornings and wanting to stay in bed and snuggle because of the warmth. I'll have to look into a light-alarm clock for myself. Good suggestion!

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12 Answers

3
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on December 23, 2010
at 02:55 PM

Try going to bed sooner.

Or

Try taking a mid day nap.

Your body is telling you that your current rest is inadequate.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on March 20, 2011
at 09:46 PM

Anonymous downvote. Awesome.

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on March 21, 2011
at 01:57 PM

I love naps. 8)

2
22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on December 23, 2010
at 02:54 PM

I agree with many answers above but I also think "snoozing" becomes a habit like anything else and your body gets used to it. Try forcing yourself to get up and not snooze for a couple weeks and let that become habit.

61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on March 21, 2011
at 01:57 PM

Yup, this was my problem. The snooze was just a habit. Set your alarm for the time you KNOW you'll get up. Getting up with the alarm will start to become a habit.

2
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on December 23, 2010
at 01:39 PM

Alex,

I don't know where you live, but could it be just the dark winter days? This certainly makes a difference for me.

We have a light-alarmclock, you know, the ones that simulate sunrise, and gently wake you up. Maybe this could help? Here is a paleohacks thread on those.

21084e275703e9a3909dafa28e5d29b5

(1103)

on December 23, 2010
at 02:10 PM

I agree, I know for me I am more sensative to the dark winter days. It could also be the cold? I'm seeing that I "need" more like 8-9 hours of sleep instead of 7. I think it might be a combination of dark mornings and wanting to stay in bed and snuggle because of the warmth. I'll have to look into a light-alarm clock for myself. Good suggestion!

1
5f0158c23fcb5636e57b4ce097784da0

(1386)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

could be a myriad of things. best start with doing some lab tests for vitamin d, thyroid status, ferritin, B12, A1c, etc. (the usual stuff that directly influences energy levels). what supplements do you take at the moment? do you have chronic health problems?

1
B485f0cf678c0b420941e883adfea28d

on March 20, 2011
at 06:07 PM

Could be a cortisol issue. Typically cortisol levels are high in the morning (to help you actually get up) and teeter off towards the end of the day. What's your exercise schedule like? Maybe 7 1/2 hours isn't enough. Try getting a solid 9 hours a day (if possible) for a week and see if that helps

1
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on December 27, 2010
at 04:56 PM

My best answer, your sleep is low quality and so you are still tired. Looking for reasons, I would look towards something that has changed. If you haven't had this problem forever, then something has changed from before and it's effecting your sleep. Before ordering expensive blood tests, go to fitday.com and see if you nutrient intake is balanced. If you are not intaking all nutrients, then you can probably spot that deficiency via a free menu analysis. Especially look towards nutrients that are known to effect sleep and energy levels, like magnesium, potassium, etc. Paleo eating is not a set diet so you can still be nutrient deficient while eating full paleo if you choose not to eat foods that have that nutrient in it. Since the body can store nutrients, sometimes it takes a while before deficiency symptoms show up. If you choose to buy supplements, make sure that you research each one before purchase to make sure you get a highly digestible version.

Next, I would consider your carb intake. If you are low carb with no obvious need for it(ie no blood sugar probs, etc), you might want to try upping healthy carb intake to about 100g to 150g and see if that helps. Some people just do better on more carbs.

After that, I would look to other issues other people have mentioned. SOme people have mild forms of narcolepsy so look into that. No one knows exactly what causes it, but there is a genetic tendency towards it in some families.

Also, any other thing like any kind of underlying illness, or stress, or depression, can cause sleep problems.

48a30b4022fff51f4a1b817dbb1ebb84

(90)

on January 11, 2011
at 04:51 PM

Great advice. Thanks.

1
2b4f887f5fd32a37c6038eb0aaaf3bf5

on December 24, 2010
at 05:03 AM

Oh dear friend, how I relate! I can easily hit the snooze button for two and a half hours. I finally succumbed, and had a sleep study test. And sure enough, I have sleep apnea. A lot of people think that only overweight people have sleep apnea, and while it is true, weight does make it worse, it is not the only cause. A lot of us have crowded jaws & throats (which I thank to our poor western diet as we grew up, but that's me).

It turned out my oxygenation levels were down to about 85% or lower during the night. Under 92% they put people on oxygen.

So, they put my on a cpap machine, and yes, finally, I can wake up! Before it was like I was underwater, and could. not. wake. up. No matter if I slept 6 hours, or 10, or the normal 8 or 9. But now, even with less sleep, it's easier to get up.

But yes, harder when it is dark out (I really need brightness to wake up). And harder when I'm not really very enthused to start my day.

Although, I've always had a problem, and it looks like it is new in onset for you.

1
99103b988d8ad555f5dcf14c7f243ae9

(10)

on December 23, 2010
at 07:31 PM

Hi Alex,

could be that you're off your sleep schedule. What I mean by that is there are time during our sleep cycle that our sleep is deeper or lighter. Your current schedule (7.5) might be right at the moment when you are trying to wake up at your deepest sleep cycle. Try sleeping for 6.5 hours or 8.5 or if you fall asleep at an odd time try an even time (9pm vs 10pm). Also do you have a proper "going to sleep" routine? Could be that you're overly stimulated before bedtime and aren't sleeping properly. Or it could be that the temperature in your bedroom is too warm, the body doesn't sleep very well in hot temperature.

Hope that helps :)

1
9722850c9a1c47b79edf7c4233040248

(1276)

on December 23, 2010
at 06:36 PM

Try the circadian rhythm test on this page:

http://www.usa.philips.com/c/light-therapy/11625/cat/#/cp_tab1

This could be a winter light issue. I have one of their blue lamps. I haven't used it this winter because I don't need to get up at a certain time, and I'm pregnant so I'm enjoying all the sleep I can get. Vitamin D is also a huge help. If I needed to be up early though, I'd be training myself with my lamp again.

And if it turns out that you're sensitive to light, follow the usual rules: blackout curtains, no blue lights at night, go to bed early, get on a schedule, etc. Neurologists have also told me that 9 hours is what most people's bodies really want, especially in winter. You can train yourself to do okay on less and not notice that you really do need more to function fully. Try for 9.

0
48a30b4022fff51f4a1b817dbb1ebb84

on December 27, 2010
at 04:32 PM

Many good suggestions. The circadian rhythm test noted that I'm mildly misaligned. Dark days combined with not enough sleep may be the simple reason, although I've had other sleep issues for years (waking up and not being able to go back to sleep). Covering lights and being better about a routine have helped some but not 100%.

I have no chronic health issues that I know about. I know my Vit D is on the low side (around 37 - I'm doing the Grassroots study), and it's been really hard to get it up. It's gone up only 2 pts in the past year or so even with some pretty heavy supplementation (did a prescription 50,000 IU and then was doing 5,000 IU several times a week, now doing 1,000 IU most days). I haven't had the others tested. I'll look more into these and adrenal fatigue.

I have noticed that less energy and/or motivation to work out has correlated with the sleepy mornings issue.

0
7c54477eb416a12ec29d94b3a9dbad41

on December 27, 2010
at 08:13 AM

I found a plug in timer made by Brinks (the home security people) that my lamp plugs into. It cost me $15 at Walmart. It's awesome for several reasons. 1. I can wake up with the light at whatever time I set. 2. I can use the item to "dim" my previously on/off lamp. 3. The lamp has two full on and off time settings that you can program. I imagine this is in case you're out of town and you want your light to convince potential burglars that someone's home... but it also convinces my 19 month old daughter and I to wake when the light comes on in my darkly shaded bedroom in the morning. Fantastic and inexpensive! Only one teensy drawback... I just have to throw something on the illuminated digital clock before I go to bed, it's a little too bright for my light sensitive sleep habits. That's hardly a real issue.

0
30c294a878674535234b5b3720128efe

on December 27, 2010
at 04:48 AM

I would look into an adrenal issue if fixing your sleep pattern doesn't help. If you search for "adrenal fatigue symptoms" you can see if there are any other things that might be related. If so, there are tests you can do to determine if that's your issue. It's a matter of food and lifestyle changes to fix it, so it's not too big a deal if it is..... but that's where I would go next.

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