7

votes

Do your small children sleep alone or with you?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 14, 2011 at 4:42 PM

Interesting article on how evolution explains why children protest bedtimes so strongly.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/freedom-learn/201110/why-young-children-protest-bedtime-story-evolutionary-mismatch

The answer begins to emerge as soon as we leave the Western world and look at children elsewhere. Bedtime protest is unique to Western and Westernized cultures. In all other cultures, infants and young children sleep in the same room and usually in the same bed with one or more adult caregivers, and bedtime protest is non-existent.[2]. What infants and young children protest, apparently, is not going to bed per se, but going to bed alone, in the dark, at night. When people in non-Western cultures hear about the Western practice of putting young children to bed in separate rooms from themselves, often without even an older sibling to sleep with, they are shocked. "The poor little kids!" they say. "How could their parents be so cruel?" Those who are most shocked are people in hunter-gatherer societies, for they know very well why young children protest against being left alone in the dark.

How do your kids handle bedtime? Where and with whom do they sleep?

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 25, 2011
at 02:23 PM

I can definitely see the benefits to this arrangement. But what about privacy and intimacy for the parents? When your children sleep in bed with you, there's no chance for the parents to have sex at night.

Medium avatar

(12379)

on October 17, 2011
at 08:58 PM

It is fantastic that you have such a close relationship to your parents - kudos to you and them. We may just be arguing small details. (And for the record - I'm canadian, so my observation of parenting in europe and the us is limited) I don't feel that most parents 'screw up' their children; and there is certainly no right and wrong way to raise a child - every parent and every child is different.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 07:12 PM

That's fair. I'll stand by my blanket statement about Americans and Europeans and let my parents take the credit for their judgments I regurgitated (though I obviously do believe in them). I'm on the phone right now with my parents reading them this and this is what they say: "...No! Children are perfect, parents are imperfect and screw them up..." and "...why do you spend time on these stupid sites, didn't we teach you anything... lol... do us a favor Edward, when you do have kids stay off the Internet so you don't screw our grandchildren up."

Medium avatar

(12379)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:43 PM

"In Europe people talk. In America the first time people hear something they don't like they argue or accuse of lack of experience" That's a pretty blanket statement. My experience does not lead me to the same conclusion as you have had. I also think Melissa hit the nail on the head - you don't have children...parenting is imperfect - children are imperfect; but once you are a parent you will see that you will be judged the way you are judging now. The biggest lesson that I have been taught since becoming a parent is to stop judging others on what they need to do to get by.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 15, 2011
at 01:31 PM

LOL, Karen. It wasn't you, for sure. Thanks for posting the question, it started some interesting discussion.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on October 15, 2011
at 12:06 PM

and did so until she was at least 10. Squirming, blanket stealing octopus of a child too! But it's fun to tell secrets in the dark with kids.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on October 15, 2011
at 12:02 PM

Wow, I never actually meant to participate in "party line" creation. For the record, when my daughter was a baby, she had a great big crib that was used only for stuffed toy storage, because having her sleeping with me while nursing was so much easier. She also didn't cry as much. She transitioned to a single bed at a fairly young age (2-3?) because "all my friends have their own bed." My granddaughter had a cosleeper but used her mothers bed mostly, although she didn't seem to mind the crib in the same room much. She later decided she wanted to sleep with mom (or visiting grandmoms)

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 15, 2011
at 02:07 AM

+1 :):):):) !!!!

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 15, 2011
at 02:06 AM

YAY! +1!!!!!!!!!! :)

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 15, 2011
at 02:05 AM

+1 from me! :) :)

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 15, 2011
at 01:47 AM

Hahahaha, akd! :-* Mwah!

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on October 15, 2011
at 12:21 AM

This mini comment thread had me chuckling. :)

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on October 15, 2011
at 12:21 AM

Oh my goodness this mini comment thread had me chuckling.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 14, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Try some John Denver. Works for my boys. Oh, they've shared a room from the start and it's been great.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on October 14, 2011
at 11:36 PM

whats to stop you from starting to breast feed her now? ;)

F2eb9c945a9afb8dfe06e6ea99fcb34b

(213)

on October 14, 2011
at 10:10 PM

"if your kid drops down in the middle of the store and starts screaming, that's not a bad day, that's something entirely different." Yeah, it means he needs a nap and has no business being in a grocery store. LOL!

6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on October 14, 2011
at 08:18 PM

It's truly my favorite part of the day. For just an hour or so, everyone is peaceful and together and we can wind down. Doing that alone is for the birds!

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 08:18 PM

Your right I don't have a lot of contact with kids anymore. When I was a bit younger and more involved in the community I had problems keeping them off my arms. Don't get to do that stuff anymore.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 08:16 PM

:) Melissa, of course children are going to have bad days. I'm talking about overall. But if your kid drops down in the middle of the store and starts screaming, that's not a bad day, that's something entirely different. I had plenty of bad days as a child. But that never once crossed our minds. That is learned behavior.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 08:14 PM

I was listening Edward, that's why I didn't downvote or say "Wait til you have kids" I just didn't like your assumption about parenting based on what sounded like minimal contact and observations with some children.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 08:13 PM

That's probably why I can still get Philadelphia Cream Cheese brand made with only cream and nothing else over here. And to get the exact same brand in the states without thickeners and additives would require an act of congress.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 08:10 PM

Here's a piece of free advice Melissa. Be careful not to discount the opinions of others just because they don't have the experience. In Europe people talk. In America the first time people hear something they don't like they argue or accuse of lack of experience. That's built into our culture. And it all begins with how children are raised. That aggressive response is something hard wired in at a young age. In Europe, most people will talk about anything with you, in fact, they are very interested in your opinion. Regardless of experience.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:57 PM

Nah Edward, just trying to give you perspective. When you see a kid acting up in the store, it isn't ALWAYS bad parenting. Sometimes, it's just a REALLY BAD DAY. We all have them. If you see the same child multiple times with the same behavior, blame the parenting. If it's just one day, give them a break and don't be too judgemental.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:54 PM

I don't co-sleep by choice, maybe that's the problem. Maybe I should still be breastfeeding her and I'd have ALL the upvotes! ;)

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 07:45 PM

Nope no kids. And here comes the "...wait till you have kids..." part. My Mom told me about that as well.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:44 PM

Lol! There were times I wondered if it would. But looking back, those years went by sooooooo fast. Now my baby is nearly a teenager and the other two are already out of the house (one is in college, the other has already graduated from college and--woohoo!--found a great job in his field).

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 07:39 PM

Not really the color I'm looking at, rather the culture. Big difference.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 07:36 PM

My father told me once, he doesn't understand why Americans think raising kids is hard. He said "Raising children is easy if you pay attention!" I have 2 other siblings, we were always well behaved kids always received compliments from other parents. The kids we saw throwing fits at the stores and screaming and yelling were confusing to us. My little sister would say, why is he/she acting that way?

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:34 PM

I understand the intent of your answer, but it's kind of oddly put, Edward. Trust me, every baby has it's bad days, despite all parenting efforts; black, white, asian and everything in between. I'm guessing you don't have kids yet.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:33 PM

bravo for individual personalities, both kids and parents.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:32 PM

"But, eventually all of them did move out and into their own rooms." I keep hoping this happens before college.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:32 PM

well, youre not towing the party line, melissa. i upvoted the dissent. we didnt/dont cosleep either after the first few months. i know, i know...i torture my children. i have resentful kids with reactive attachment disorder who will be obese, obvi.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:23 PM

Someone downvoted me for this answer? WEIRD.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:14 PM

I know exactly what you mean. I would enjoy more room in my bed, but I would miss waking up and seeing my daughter at her sweetest. :) I sit with a book and/or my laptop while she falls asleep most nights.

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14 Answers

11
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 14, 2011
at 06:59 PM

my three were vastly different from one another. the oldest slept with me until he was four; the second never slept with me and happily waved good-bye to the room as he was carted off to his solitude. the youngest slept with me on and off till age six.

i think that treating people as individuals is what is most natural.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:33 PM

bravo for individual personalities, both kids and parents.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 15, 2011
at 02:06 AM

YAY! +1!!!!!!!!!! :)

10
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on October 14, 2011
at 04:50 PM

Small child? NO.

Child almost as big as me? YES.

We never planned on co-sleeping and in fact, my daughter slept in her crib by herself just fine. She even transitioned to her toddler bed fairly well. Switching to the full size bed was not as easy, but she really didn't fit in the toddler bed anymore. I started out by laying down next to her while she fell asleep, then that turned into me falling asleep in there and my husband waking me when he came home from work. Then when he started working from home (in our bedroom) we all just started hanging out in our bed so we could socialize with him before bedtime. YEAH. It just kind of happened. Now it's me, husband, nine year old, two dogs and a cat in our bed.

For us I think it's more of a social thing than a fear thing.

I just keep telling myself that someday she won't want to sleep with me and I'll be sad and reminicing about when she couldn't be without me. :)

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:23 PM

Someone downvoted me for this answer? WEIRD.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:32 PM

well, youre not towing the party line, melissa. i upvoted the dissent. we didnt/dont cosleep either after the first few months. i know, i know...i torture my children. i have resentful kids with reactive attachment disorder who will be obese, obvi.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:54 PM

I don't co-sleep by choice, maybe that's the problem. Maybe I should still be breastfeeding her and I'd have ALL the upvotes! ;)

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on October 15, 2011
at 12:21 AM

This mini comment thread had me chuckling. :)

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on October 15, 2011
at 12:02 PM

Wow, I never actually meant to participate in "party line" creation. For the record, when my daughter was a baby, she had a great big crib that was used only for stuffed toy storage, because having her sleeping with me while nursing was so much easier. She also didn't cry as much. She transitioned to a single bed at a fairly young age (2-3?) because "all my friends have their own bed." My granddaughter had a cosleeper but used her mothers bed mostly, although she didn't seem to mind the crib in the same room much. She later decided she wanted to sleep with mom (or visiting grandmoms)

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 15, 2011
at 01:31 PM

LOL, Karen. It wasn't you, for sure. Thanks for posting the question, it started some interesting discussion.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on October 15, 2011
at 12:21 AM

Oh my goodness this mini comment thread had me chuckling.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 15, 2011
at 02:05 AM

+1 from me! :) :)

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 15, 2011
at 01:47 AM

Hahahaha, akd! :-* Mwah!

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on October 14, 2011
at 11:36 PM

whats to stop you from starting to breast feed her now? ;)

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on October 15, 2011
at 12:06 PM

and did so until she was at least 10. Squirming, blanket stealing octopus of a child too! But it's fun to tell secrets in the dark with kids.

7
3414f91a77f564517f30c391d36c85b4

on October 14, 2011
at 05:24 PM

My son who turned 21 today, slept in our bed for the first 3 1/2 years. That's how long I nursed him also. Which btw gave him an awesome immune system. It never made sense to me to separate the baby from the mother at night. When it gets dark they don't need us anymore? Totally unnatural and goes against the laws of nature.

7
68c6f0cb7344d679c878905917fa9655

on October 14, 2011
at 04:57 PM

Our 5-year-old and our 2-year-old (still night nursing) both sleep in bed with us. To do otherwise seems totally against nature. No other altricial mammal kicks its vulnerable young out of the nest so early, so speak.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 15, 2011
at 02:07 AM

+1 :):):):) !!!!

6
6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on October 14, 2011
at 06:49 PM

All three of my kids coslept with me. The now 13 yr old went to her own bed when her brother was born (she was 4). My 8 yr old finally moved to his own bed a few months ago but he gets up in the middle of the night and gets in bed with me. My youngest is 3 and sleeps with me, but didn't start out that way. I moved him to my bed one night that he got sick and the rest is history.

I have a king size bed and I am divorced, so it's just us. I've actually gotten everyone out of my bed before but I hated it. I actually enjoy the wind down time where I am reading a little and we're talking. Almost like dinner table type stuff....oh wait, I guess that's pillow talk eh?

6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on October 14, 2011
at 08:18 PM

It's truly my favorite part of the day. For just an hour or so, everyone is peaceful and together and we can wind down. Doing that alone is for the birds!

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:14 PM

I know exactly what you mean. I would enjoy more room in my bed, but I would miss waking up and seeing my daughter at her sweetest. :) I sit with a book and/or my laptop while she falls asleep most nights.

5
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 14, 2011
at 05:12 PM

Yeah, my four year old still sleeps in our bed. The two year old actually prefers his own bed...go figure. They both co-slept while nursing.

And glad to see yet an article validating "what comes natural".

4
78fcdeee6ac4ee7d071bbac56b9e359f

(1025)

on October 14, 2011
at 06:54 PM

7 month old sleeps with us and the 4 year old (who slept with us for about 18 months) sleeps in her own bed. I just finished reading "The Continuum Concept" actually, so I've told my 4 year old she can come sleep with us if she wants to (we have a king size mattress on the floor now instead of the double bed w/ frame we had when she was a baby). So far she hasn't taken us up on the offer, but she's always welcome.

4
120acd55f9e94216932687fd50a140bd

on October 14, 2011
at 05:53 PM

Our two daughters (1 and 3) sleep alone, and go to bed at 7pm, about 1 and a half hours earlier than us parents. The 3 yo had a brief period of bedtime protest, but that ceased when I started singing songs to her after the lights were out. Now she turns the light off herself and is eager to hear "Sweet Baby James." They will soon share a bedroom, and I hope that they both ask for songs when that time comes.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 14, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Try some John Denver. Works for my boys. Oh, they've shared a room from the start and it's been great.

4
21b36b3de8ff31b0d41e7f0f4b5c1e03

(1688)

on October 14, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Co-sleeping for two years, nursing for longer. At eight still enjoys curling up with us. Just followed my instincts on all this.

3
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:27 PM

We coslept with all three of our kids. We also did extended breastfeeding.

I put my oldest child in his cradle the first night we were home and laid down (across the room) in our bed. I couldn't sleep at all. I went and got him, put him in bed with us, and never looked back. Plus, it made night feedings soooooooo much easier. I got way more sleep than most of my friends did because I didn't have to get out of bed to feed a hungry baby--I barely even had to wake up.

Starting around age 2-3 they had their own toddler beds in their bedrooms, so they could choose to sleep there if they preferred (they rarely did). But, eventually all of them did move out and into their own rooms.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:44 PM

Lol! There were times I wondered if it would. But looking back, those years went by sooooooo fast. Now my baby is nearly a teenager and the other two are already out of the house (one is in college, the other has already graduated from college and--woohoo!--found a great job in his field).

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:32 PM

"But, eventually all of them did move out and into their own rooms." I keep hoping this happens before college.

2
B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 07:29 PM

Quite honestly I'm not sure why this is frowned upon in the West. I think forcing your small children to sleep alone can also have some long term behavioral effects. Specifically you might find your children to act in negative attention seeking behavior. Especially if you work and don't get to see your children often anyway, the more time you spend with them when they are really young I think the less problems you'll have in the long run. The brattiest kids I've ever seen are parented by parents who tell their kids to find something to do or leave them alone for long periods of time while they are small. The quietest babies I've ever seen are Asian babies, Asian mothers are very attentive and stimulating to their small children. Every time I step onto an airplane I get stuck by a bunch of noisy American kids. I look over and there is an Asian mother sitting with her son/daughter still and quite. Not only have Americans forgotten how to eat they've forgotten how to raise children. African-African babies are quite as well. And I love when when parents make excuses for their children's behavior. Alexander Hamilton was running a shipyard at the age of 14. In fact most kids in those times had more responsibilities than some adults do today. Children are perfectly capable of being responsible and making good choices if you take the time to be a good parent.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 07:39 PM

Not really the color I'm looking at, rather the culture. Big difference.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 08:10 PM

Here's a piece of free advice Melissa. Be careful not to discount the opinions of others just because they don't have the experience. In Europe people talk. In America the first time people hear something they don't like they argue or accuse of lack of experience. That's built into our culture. And it all begins with how children are raised. That aggressive response is something hard wired in at a young age. In Europe, most people will talk about anything with you, in fact, they are very interested in your opinion. Regardless of experience.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 08:18 PM

Your right I don't have a lot of contact with kids anymore. When I was a bit younger and more involved in the community I had problems keeping them off my arms. Don't get to do that stuff anymore.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:34 PM

I understand the intent of your answer, but it's kind of oddly put, Edward. Trust me, every baby has it's bad days, despite all parenting efforts; black, white, asian and everything in between. I'm guessing you don't have kids yet.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 08:13 PM

That's probably why I can still get Philadelphia Cream Cheese brand made with only cream and nothing else over here. And to get the exact same brand in the states without thickeners and additives would require an act of congress.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 07:36 PM

My father told me once, he doesn't understand why Americans think raising kids is hard. He said "Raising children is easy if you pay attention!" I have 2 other siblings, we were always well behaved kids always received compliments from other parents. The kids we saw throwing fits at the stores and screaming and yelling were confusing to us. My little sister would say, why is he/she acting that way?

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 08:16 PM

:) Melissa, of course children are going to have bad days. I'm talking about overall. But if your kid drops down in the middle of the store and starts screaming, that's not a bad day, that's something entirely different. I had plenty of bad days as a child. But that never once crossed our minds. That is learned behavior.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 14, 2011
at 07:45 PM

Nope no kids. And here comes the "...wait till you have kids..." part. My Mom told me about that as well.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 08:14 PM

I was listening Edward, that's why I didn't downvote or say "Wait til you have kids" I just didn't like your assumption about parenting based on what sounded like minimal contact and observations with some children.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on October 14, 2011
at 07:57 PM

Nah Edward, just trying to give you perspective. When you see a kid acting up in the store, it isn't ALWAYS bad parenting. Sometimes, it's just a REALLY BAD DAY. We all have them. If you see the same child multiple times with the same behavior, blame the parenting. If it's just one day, give them a break and don't be too judgemental.

F2eb9c945a9afb8dfe06e6ea99fcb34b

(213)

on October 14, 2011
at 10:10 PM

"if your kid drops down in the middle of the store and starts screaming, that's not a bad day, that's something entirely different." Yeah, it means he needs a nap and has no business being in a grocery store. LOL!

Medium avatar

(12379)

on October 17, 2011
at 08:58 PM

It is fantastic that you have such a close relationship to your parents - kudos to you and them. We may just be arguing small details. (And for the record - I'm canadian, so my observation of parenting in europe and the us is limited) I don't feel that most parents 'screw up' their children; and there is certainly no right and wrong way to raise a child - every parent and every child is different.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 07:12 PM

That's fair. I'll stand by my blanket statement about Americans and Europeans and let my parents take the credit for their judgments I regurgitated (though I obviously do believe in them). I'm on the phone right now with my parents reading them this and this is what they say: "...No! Children are perfect, parents are imperfect and screw them up..." and "...why do you spend time on these stupid sites, didn't we teach you anything... lol... do us a favor Edward, when you do have kids stay off the Internet so you don't screw our grandchildren up."

Medium avatar

(12379)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:43 PM

"In Europe people talk. In America the first time people hear something they don't like they argue or accuse of lack of experience" That's a pretty blanket statement. My experience does not lead me to the same conclusion as you have had. I also think Melissa hit the nail on the head - you don't have children...parenting is imperfect - children are imperfect; but once you are a parent you will see that you will be judged the way you are judging now. The biggest lesson that I have been taught since becoming a parent is to stop judging others on what they need to do to get by.

1
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on October 14, 2011
at 11:45 PM

My five-year-old didn't sleep well with us. (We tried cosleeping with her, but it really didn't work out for either her or us.) She and my son (2 1/2) share a room now, and have since the little guy stopped exclusively cosleeping. He still wakes up at night and wanders in to sleep with us, but he prefers going to bed in his own bed. {Shrug.} They seem happy enough, and the only times bedtime ends up being a fight is if they're overtired. Plenty of cuddling and storytime before bed, regardless.

1
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on October 14, 2011
at 10:26 PM

We bought a 400 dollar cosleeper basinette and 10 months later it's never been used except as a place to store cloth diapers so I don't have to get out of bed to change him at night. hahaha

At some point we're planning on getting a toddler bed to side car to our queen size bed since things are already getting a bit crowded. My husband likes it because he works during most of my son's waking hours, so it lets him cuddle with the baby even if he doesn't get to see him most of the weekdays. Also it makes night nursing a lot easier. Bed time is totally drama free. I like that.

1
Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 14, 2011
at 10:18 PM

Our daughter slept with us in our bed until she was about five, and our son until he was about three. After they both moved to their own beds, there was still a period where they would wake and spend the rest of the night in bed with us. Now at ages twelve and eight, they each have their own rooms, and most of the time, fall asleep quickly and sleep all night, about nine to eleven hours. Most of my friends co-sleep/slept with their young ones, but a lot of family members found this very strange. I found it so comforting to wake to their breathing in the night, and I loved watching them be so peaceful, no matter how trying of a day we may have had...

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