11

votes

How do you explain the skinny people?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 16, 2010 at 3:44 AM

After reading Taubes you'd think everybody who eats the Standard American Diet would be obese. And with a third of the American population overweight or more, it's looking that way.

But how does the theory explain the people who eat copious bread, pasta, soda, etc, but seem to be no fatter than anybody else?

Adolescents especially seem to be immune ...

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 10, 2012
at 12:36 AM

AMEN, Anna!! PERFECT answer. Love it. (*Especially* your last line.)

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on January 30, 2012
at 09:53 PM

I am thankful I got fat! If I'd been thin, I never would have tried out this crazy paleo stuff. ;-)

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on January 30, 2012
at 09:46 PM

What's your/your family's ethnicity?

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 30, 2012
at 07:46 PM

Jon, check out the book Deep Nutrition....the palette/jaw thing is in there, plus much more!

1bb6eebe117c62ac60e7881a0fc873dd

(0)

on January 30, 2012
at 07:27 PM

I guess I should clarify. I went raw food vegan and lost too much weight. Down to 105 at 5'6". I started eating cooked food again with terrible digestion. Now I am basically eating, soaked grains, vegetables, fruits, and meats. I make a bone broth and drink it and my hands turn yellow. I am now 120 lbs, but it's skinny fat. So I eat all kinds of cooked food now and rarely any raw because of digestion. I know I shouldn't have grains but I don't know what kind of food to start off with since my digestion is so poor. I can't afford to eat 10lbs of meat a day.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 30, 2012
at 07:01 PM

Janice, if you haven't already you might consider the advice given to people going the other way. Start gradually, probably with breakfast. Include a small portion of protein/fat and then eat as you had in the past. Once you feel better, increase the protein/fat servings at breakfast until they are the dominant foods. Only when you're comfortable with that should you start including cooked food with lunch--tuber maybe? Anyhow, take your time with this transition just like any other. I mean, when I started drinking water kefir I started with a tbsp per day and I still felt things happening.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on January 30, 2012
at 06:23 PM

Skinny people just have less obvious health problems. I had kidney stones, someone else may have a thyroid issue or Chron's.

A912ff969107d3eda04ee78c683a6bc5

(178)

on November 22, 2011
at 02:58 PM

Also, don't forget the "scooter royalty!"

A912ff969107d3eda04ee78c683a6bc5

(178)

on November 22, 2011
at 02:56 PM

The deformities that Tim mentioned also end up causing breathing issues such as sleep apnea. Apnea is often thought to be caused by obesity but over on the CPAP forum some lose the weight and still need their CPAP.

4e40d2b9e1a762949a25b958762aa10d

(762)

on February 16, 2011
at 10:34 PM

Can you elaborate?

3573f7a18ee620179fda184c7d8b7242

(241)

on November 03, 2010
at 09:25 PM

My MIL also thinks I'm crazy. She way under eats, won't eat fat or meat, (and avoids all sweets) and looks rather like a starvation victim, but swears by the whole grains. She has high blood pressure and glaucoma, but believes that these are b/c of factors out of her control DESPITE her excellent diet. After all, she is quite thin, which to her mind is validation that she is eating the 'right' way. (The high level of conviction and anger are a whole separate subject.) I'm thinking that the high blood pressure is the beginning of more 'non-visible' issues to come; I guess we'll see.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on November 03, 2010
at 11:19 AM

A friend of mine was seated next to Taubes at a dinner and said he seemed to be in very good shape.

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on March 19, 2010
at 01:15 PM

Ahh, but then tolerated is not optimal! Just imagine your Grandma's life if the SAD were removed and Paleo were her routine.

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on March 19, 2010
at 01:12 PM

I witnessed this very thing not more than 1/2 hour ago!

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2010
at 04:01 AM

Oh, another thing that occurred to me today... quite a few Paleo-ers mention vastly improved oral health along with sizable weight loss after switching over. I've always had excellent oral health. I never floss and only brush twice a day. Two years ago I went to the dentist for the first time in 8 years, the hygienist couldn't believe I hadn't had a cleaning in 8 years. A little tarter build-up in one spot, but gums were quite healthy and no cavities. So there you go, another indicator of genetic link between oral health, heart health, and adaptation to an agriculture-based diet.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 25, 2010
at 09:00 AM

Yeh, useful distinction DC. I've certain seen more gains in strength when power-lifting and more gains in mass when doing hypertrophy (did each for about 1.5 years). The genetic (or other) differences do seem to be massive however, much as I hate anecdotal evidence the weight room is full of people doing awful workouts (endless bicep curls, eating pasta) who are massive and I have plenty muscular friends who were muscular despite never lifting a weight. Myself and another friend who train regularly are plenty fit, extremely lean, but never become markedly huge.

48d73cb880d957ebc147d658f21c0318

(261)

on February 24, 2010
at 06:31 AM

You got me there, Melissa. I wasn't careful in my edit. A better response to the setup, "Why is Taubes overweight," would be, "I don't know, is he?" But the whole point is to avoid getting trapped in nonsensical disconnected gibberish posing as question.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 24, 2010
at 02:29 AM

Taubes doesn't look overweight to me... http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1197/1396892039_3072e4bb3a.jpg Not skinny though. Eades looked similar for a long time until he got really strict. I suspect that is Taubes' problem as well. Us young uns can cheat a little, but as you get older you really get punished .

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on February 23, 2010
at 06:25 PM

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/12/malocclusion-disease-of-civilization.html From conception to adolescence the human skull/jaw/tooth structures are all developing. Poor nutrition is what has led to crowded mouths, crooked, decaying teeth, stunted sinus cavity development (mouth breathing nation/allergies, infections more common), poor eye development resulting in poor eyesight, etc Did ancient Masai or Gaelic fishermen need extreme dental work and eye glasses to survive? or was it their ancient Paleo nutrition that kept dental arches wide and robust?!

03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on February 23, 2010
at 05:24 PM

Well, probably a bit of both. Btw, David... I had always heard of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar hypertrophy. Myoplasmic is new to me. At first I thought you had the wrong term, but I looked it up, and you are right! Thanks for the vocab lesson.

F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on February 23, 2010
at 05:01 PM

I've never heard this before in relation to braces et al. I always heard that braces et al were caused my a mismatch of teeth and jaws. Some people have large teeth, and some people have small jaws, and their offspring may end up with a mismatched set of genes.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on February 16, 2010
at 02:48 PM

40 years old was also the point at which I started getting flabby and "skinny fat."

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on February 16, 2010
at 02:10 PM

I know quite a few "skinny fat people".

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on February 16, 2010
at 02:08 PM

I think the weight room situation you mentioned has more to do with training practices than genetics. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy will produce bigger looking muscles. Myoplasmic hypertrophy will produce more strength and moderate size gains.

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21 Answers

best answer

21
F0978a2a1c37d2a3d4ec6344c0c4ff82

on February 23, 2010
at 03:22 PM

Metabolic derangement like ScottMGS pointed out can take many different forms in different people and take varying amount of times to manifest. People differ in their tolerance to toxins to a degree (think of alcohol) and glycotoxicity or gluten damage I suspect is not different. Likewise, people tend to use substrates at differing rates so deficiencies in Vitamin D3 or essential fats can have differing effects.

Obesity, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease all are being shown currently to have metabolic roots. While not generally considered Paleo and not popular even among just the plain old low-carb community, Charles Washington of Zero-Carb fame (or notoriety) has stated repeatedly that "fat people are the lucky ones." The counter-intuitive point I think he is trying to make is that by getting fat you get an obvious outward manifestation of your metabolic derangement while others may deteriorate silently within only to have diabetes or cancer seemingly strike them from out of nowhere. If you got fat be thankful you got a warning. Being or staying "skinny" is no guarantee of metabolic health.

Somewhat related, I must point out that health and fitness should not be conflated either. Being "buff" does not guarantee health. Very athletic people can and do have heart attacks, for instance, and it is not limited to endurance athletes or CrossFitters who took their MetCon vision-quest a bit too far.

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on January 30, 2012
at 09:53 PM

I am thankful I got fat! If I'd been thin, I never would have tried out this crazy paleo stuff. ;-)

16
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on February 16, 2010
at 06:33 AM

I'm one of those skinny people. Have been my whole life, along with all the men in my family. From 18 to 37 I literally have not gained more than 6-7 lbs. For me and many other thin to normal people I think it is we are extremely well adapted to an agriculture-based diet.

Remember humans have continued to evolve over the past 10,000 years. That is some 400+ generations. Any lab biologist, dog breeder, or dairy farmer can attest an almost unimaginable amount of variation can express in a mere 20-40 generations. Among humans, we have developed lactase persistence and efficient alcohol metabolization. I suspect there are similar adaptations to carbohydrates in general, and wheat/gluten in particular. Actually, I know there are, as in Celiac disease.

I'm interested in Paleo for the health aspects, particularly as regards the missing vitamins and vital-lipids in the modern diet, but I also feel if one has always been in fine health eating moderate amounts of wheat and grains then don't sweat it. And for those that have NOT been fine with moderate amounts of grain (or couldn't self-regulate to only moderate amounts) and have cut them out completely I think that makes good sense as well.

In fact I have no problem with vegetarians, paleos, and everyone in between. I do have a problem with the evangelists and zealots that swear theirs is the one and only true way.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 26, 2010
at 04:01 AM

Oh, another thing that occurred to me today... quite a few Paleo-ers mention vastly improved oral health along with sizable weight loss after switching over. I've always had excellent oral health. I never floss and only brush twice a day. Two years ago I went to the dentist for the first time in 8 years, the hygienist couldn't believe I hadn't had a cleaning in 8 years. A little tarter build-up in one spot, but gums were quite healthy and no cavities. So there you go, another indicator of genetic link between oral health, heart health, and adaptation to an agriculture-based diet.

D4d83e7981ca572aaaa19fc620bb54f1

(467)

on January 30, 2012
at 09:46 PM

What's your/your family's ethnicity?

13
A49ad052f6f7cb7dfe39e9285e2263fb

on February 23, 2010
at 11:15 PM

Genetic or epigenetic differences in the insulin sensitivity ratio between liver and adipocytes. That's what explains skinny people who eat crap.

4e40d2b9e1a762949a25b958762aa10d

(762)

on February 16, 2011
at 10:34 PM

Can you elaborate?

9
9722850c9a1c47b79edf7c4233040248

(1276)

on February 25, 2010
at 03:23 PM

It seems to me that how people respond to the SAD depends on genetics. In my case, I think it would be incorrect to say "Obesity and diabetes run through my family," and correct to say "When my family eats the SAD, they become obese and diabetic." Luckily, I'm still young enough to change my ways with minimal pain!

My mother in law thinks I'm crazy and fad-ish for eating minimal carbs, and was quite vocal about it until I told her I'd figured out I'm a sub-clinical celiac. Apparently a disease need a clinical name before she'll take it seriously. But she's a skinny little thing who can eat the worst parts of the SAD (especially politically correct pseudo-vegetarianism and saturated fat-hating), with gallons of sweet soy milk, industrial oils, trans-fats, hardly any animal fat, almost no red meat, etc. At least she gets her leafy greens, but they probably lose all their goodness with the industrial salad dressing she pours on. She's not toned, but I couldn't call her skinny-fat either, by any means! But she has a lot of digestive and gall bladder issues, allergies and sinus headaches, and all her kids have narrow faces and desperately needed braces and glasses (they otherwise flourished and have always been smart and happy, something my siblings can't all say).

So while my family genetically responds mainly by getting larger and diabetic, her family genetically responds by mainly getting nasty, uncomfortable digestive issues. A family like theirs gets non-visible issues, non-obviously-diet-related, but they're still suffering on the inside. Especially as they age, which I think she's about to figure out. I suppose that when talking to a skinny person on the SAD it's easiest to go through the diseases of civilization other than obesity and diabetes. Allergies, arthritis, irritable bowel, narrow face, headaches, eye problems, blood pressure, hypoglycemia, crooked teeth, sugar crashes, heart issues, etc, etc? It's your diet, baby, or least least exacerbated by it. The fat ones are lucky, because the cause of the problem is obvious, even if the correct dietary solution isn't. The skinny ones just say "guess it's one of those things.... Pass the corn flakes."

3573f7a18ee620179fda184c7d8b7242

(241)

on November 03, 2010
at 09:25 PM

My MIL also thinks I'm crazy. She way under eats, won't eat fat or meat, (and avoids all sweets) and looks rather like a starvation victim, but swears by the whole grains. She has high blood pressure and glaucoma, but believes that these are b/c of factors out of her control DESPITE her excellent diet. After all, she is quite thin, which to her mind is validation that she is eating the 'right' way. (The high level of conviction and anger are a whole separate subject.) I'm thinking that the high blood pressure is the beginning of more 'non-visible' issues to come; I guess we'll see.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on May 10, 2012
at 12:36 AM

AMEN, Anna!! PERFECT answer. Love it. (*Especially* your last line.)

9
85386e1e883e78f7760f9cc007037b52

(180)

on February 16, 2010
at 08:50 AM

The short answer is genetic variation. In the same way that some people have natural immunity to a particular disease, skinny people do not have the same insulin response to the SAD that fat people do. Having said that, there may be other health issues apart from obesity associated with the SAD that naturally thin people may still suffer.

8
5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on February 16, 2010
at 04:31 AM

Metabolic Syndrome (or The Diseases of Civilization or whatever it's called now) expresses differently in different people and at different ages. Just because a teenager is skinny now (many of us were) doesn't mean s/he won't be an insulin resistant diabetic by age forty.

7
0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

on February 23, 2010
at 03:45 PM

Obesity is only one manifestation of ill health that the SAD brings us. A favorite subject of mine lately is skull, jaw, dental development. It is common for crowded, skinny mouths/sinus and poor eyesight. The SAD diet for mother and child has left a handful of generations (skinny and fat alike) malformed. It is shocking how many people require braces, tooth removal, corrective lenses, sinus procedures.... and it is not considered odd.

The SAD has so many consequences as other commenters have listed, my path to a Paleo approach was brought by my need to lose body fat, and has led to my understanding of the Paleo implications to ward off cancer, osteoporosis, arthritis, dimentia, Alzheimer's, MS, diabetes, allergies... myriad illness all non-issues on Paleo.

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on February 23, 2010
at 06:25 PM

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/12/malocclusion-disease-of-civilization.html From conception to adolescence the human skull/jaw/tooth structures are all developing. Poor nutrition is what has led to crowded mouths, crooked, decaying teeth, stunted sinus cavity development (mouth breathing nation/allergies, infections more common), poor eye development resulting in poor eyesight, etc Did ancient Masai or Gaelic fishermen need extreme dental work and eye glasses to survive? or was it their ancient Paleo nutrition that kept dental arches wide and robust?!

F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on February 23, 2010
at 05:01 PM

I've never heard this before in relation to braces et al. I always heard that braces et al were caused my a mismatch of teeth and jaws. Some people have large teeth, and some people have small jaws, and their offspring may end up with a mismatched set of genes.

A912ff969107d3eda04ee78c683a6bc5

(178)

on November 22, 2011
at 02:56 PM

The deformities that Tim mentioned also end up causing breathing issues such as sleep apnea. Apnea is often thought to be caused by obesity but over on the CPAP forum some lose the weight and still need their CPAP.

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 30, 2012
at 07:46 PM

Jon, check out the book Deep Nutrition....the palette/jaw thing is in there, plus much more!

5
B3c0950cd33bf7689ca0b98e5f2b6cdc

(588)

on February 25, 2010
at 03:42 AM

I notice the mothers at Walmart who are nothing more than grotesque accretions of flesh, shopping baskets full of garbage, with their cute, rail-thin teenage daughters. Do these girls look at their mothers and see their future there? I doubt it.

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on March 19, 2010
at 01:12 PM

I witnessed this very thing not more than 1/2 hour ago!

A912ff969107d3eda04ee78c683a6bc5

(178)

on November 22, 2011
at 02:58 PM

Also, don't forget the "scooter royalty!"

5
D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on February 16, 2010
at 05:37 AM

I was one of those people that could eat and drink anything I wanted and never put on weight. Then I left the Army and turned forty. I put on over 20 pounds in 2 years, then another 20 over the next 8 years before I got pissed off and started to fix it. Even so, I was not obese according to BMI ... but I sure didn't like where my waist was going.

There are a lot of people who are not obese according to height & weight charts, but have unhealthy amounts of belly fat. You may have heard the term "skinny fat", so be aware that there is a difference between obsese and overweight.

Addendum - I've cleaned up my diet, and dropped nearly thirty pounds. My exercise now includes a fair bit of muscle building and I've put back about 10 pounds. Net effect is a significant recomposition.

4
13b40c07d0aab810f48eec3d04877010

(410)

on February 24, 2010
at 03:22 AM

I am also one of those who does not gain weight... I have eaten everything at different point in my life: SAD, vegan, vegetarian, omnivorous whole-food, and now low carb. I am 5' 7'' and the only time I was (slightly) above 125 was in college when I drank lots of beer! I am now 110 (41, after 3 kids). I have aunts in their 70's who are and always were rail thin - if I last that long I expect to be the same.

I agree with the comment above that folks who get fat on carbs are the lucky ones, as I got cancer at age 38... I am still trying to understand exactly how this happened to me. I am guessing something along the lines of what Dr. Harris mentions, although I don't understand the process.

3
Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

on November 02, 2010
at 05:33 PM

You mean like my skinny dad ... with diabetes.

Some people will get obese. Some diabetic. Some will get osteoperosis, IBD, ADHD, etc. Some will get multiple of those, all of those, none of those. It's simply a question of frequency. The worse your lifestyle, the more likely that you'll suffer more of the above, but it's always a genetic, environmental, etc crap shoot.

I don't know I'll live to 85 with my new lifestyle. I just know that my odds are somewhat better than they otherwise would have been, and that I'm healthier now than I otherwise would be. For me, that's well worth it.

3
065bc9a541c742defb28b9c58ad34fbd

(1783)

on November 02, 2010
at 04:55 AM

I'm skinny and always have been so. I've often wondered about how I remained at a constant weight even when I ate horribly - donuts, cake, cookies, etc every day, tons of pasta, chips, candy etc etc.

The two answers I can think of are:

1)I was never afraid of fat. Eating whatever I want and never gaining weight literally gave me the freedom to eat whatever I wanted - I never did "low fat" or "reduced fat" or cut out butter or anything like that. It's my personal experience that fat when eaten with sugar helps mitigate the worst effects of a sugar "rush".

2)I've never been a pop (soda) or beer drinker. I think liquid sugar calories can be among the worst for weight gain. My very skinny brother only put on weight when he started drinking beer.

Putting aside all that, I think the effects of the SAD has manifested within me as a skinny person in more invisible ways, from some quite directly correlated to diet to others with a more tenuous connection:

depression, anxiety, ADHD, braces/crowded teeth/very yellow teeth at a young age, very poor eyesight, scoliosis, migraines

I've often had friends or acquaintances comment that they wished they could eat whatever they wanted and stay slim, like me. Would I rather struggle with my weight and not struggle with depression? I'm not entirely sure I wouldn't mind being heavier instead.

3
D15d6820ef1545edac65e975cc2d8949

on March 07, 2010
at 08:49 PM

Most skinny people I know of explode when they turn 30... that's insulin resistance for you.

Also, skinny does not imply healthy. They often have too little muscle mass.

3
A6c24d24be86cd02215a54feb8840206

on March 07, 2010
at 08:42 PM

Good point Scott. I think another question could be asked in this panel.

How do we explain the mentally stable and happy people on the SAD diet? My obese grandmother (250lbs+) is 87 and has no diabetes, no heart disease, no high blood pressure, and no arthritis. Did I mention that she used to chain smoke? However, she is not free to move and be active. She is limited to her chair for most of the day while she exercises her mind. She is a happy lovely and very conversational woman who loves and remembers every little detail of history. She also meditates. Meanwhile, there are other elderly who experience dementia and Alzheimer's, despite their healthy body weights. There is no body weight that reflects how our minds age.

Do you guys think we should try to learn from our grandparents and reflect on our family history?

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on March 19, 2010
at 01:15 PM

Ahh, but then tolerated is not optimal! Just imagine your Grandma's life if the SAD were removed and Paleo were her routine.

3
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on February 24, 2010
at 04:32 AM

At diagnosis, 1/3 of celiacs are underweight, 1/3 are normal weight and 1/3 are obese.

3
E7edfa98fd4c90d71f43933bf34822b0

on February 16, 2010
at 11:12 AM

The beauty of an advantageous hormonal profile and/or the genetic upper-hand of possessing an efficient (or inefficient, if seen from a different angle) insulin response mechanism. Some people can live in the weight room and never get close to being "swole" while others brush by a dumbbell and end up jacked and chiseled beyond belief. It is interesting to note, though, the high percentage of Alzheimer's sufferers who are thin. I can't lay my hands on the study at the moment (Mauro Dipasquale speaks to it some, and I've seen it cited elsewhere...Eades, maybe?) -- I guess my point is that being overweight is not the only manifestation of metabolic syndrome; Alzheimer's can be thought of as "diabetes of the brain".

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on February 16, 2010
at 02:08 PM

I think the weight room situation you mentioned has more to do with training practices than genetics. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy will produce bigger looking muscles. Myoplasmic hypertrophy will produce more strength and moderate size gains.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 25, 2010
at 09:00 AM

Yeh, useful distinction DC. I've certain seen more gains in strength when power-lifting and more gains in mass when doing hypertrophy (did each for about 1.5 years). The genetic (or other) differences do seem to be massive however, much as I hate anecdotal evidence the weight room is full of people doing awful workouts (endless bicep curls, eating pasta) who are massive and I have plenty muscular friends who were muscular despite never lifting a weight. Myself and another friend who train regularly are plenty fit, extremely lean, but never become markedly huge.

03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on February 23, 2010
at 05:24 PM

Well, probably a bit of both. Btw, David... I had always heard of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar hypertrophy. Myoplasmic is new to me. At first I thought you had the wrong term, but I looked it up, and you are right! Thanks for the vocab lesson.

2
52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on February 24, 2010
at 01:07 AM

Most people would have called me skinny before paleo. Now I'm down 30+ pounds AND I can do pull ups. I think I was one of those "skinny fat" people too.

2
95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on February 23, 2010
at 12:39 PM

I was one of those skinny people... 'til I hit 40 or so, then I had to start working at it. So was my dad, and my kids look to be going the same way. Genetics seems like the obvious answer.

0
217fc6ef1b76bf244bcb22b3e5c5841c

on February 05, 2013
at 08:12 PM

Something else that no one talks about is how skinny people actually look without clothes. If you saw me walking down the street you'd probably say that I looked super fit, skinny, and DEFINITELY not like I need to lose weight. I'm 5'4" and 115 pounds, I wear a size zero, I can't even shop in regular mall stores because their size zero is too big. BUT, what you don't see is that when I take my shirt off, I have a ring around my torso of fat. I have fat between my thighs. And I have that muffin top, big enough to grab it. So, just because you see someone who "looks skinny", doesn't mean you know what their body is like.

0
1bb6eebe117c62ac60e7881a0fc873dd

on January 30, 2012
at 06:17 PM

I have severe digestion issues after going raw food vegan. I would like to do paleo but I'm having a hard time digesting fats. I am also "fat skinny" however I was in better shape when I was completely raw vegan, but once I went back to cooked foods, oh my it was awful. Also how do you get enough calories from just meat and vegetables and fruit? Where do you start? Do you need to use digestive enzymes first?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 30, 2012
at 07:01 PM

Janice, if you haven't already you might consider the advice given to people going the other way. Start gradually, probably with breakfast. Include a small portion of protein/fat and then eat as you had in the past. Once you feel better, increase the protein/fat servings at breakfast until they are the dominant foods. Only when you're comfortable with that should you start including cooked food with lunch--tuber maybe? Anyhow, take your time with this transition just like any other. I mean, when I started drinking water kefir I started with a tbsp per day and I still felt things happening.

1bb6eebe117c62ac60e7881a0fc873dd

(0)

on January 30, 2012
at 07:27 PM

I guess I should clarify. I went raw food vegan and lost too much weight. Down to 105 at 5'6". I started eating cooked food again with terrible digestion. Now I am basically eating, soaked grains, vegetables, fruits, and meats. I make a bone broth and drink it and my hands turn yellow. I am now 120 lbs, but it's skinny fat. So I eat all kinds of cooked food now and rarely any raw because of digestion. I know I shouldn't have grains but I don't know what kind of food to start off with since my digestion is so poor. I can't afford to eat 10lbs of meat a day.

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48d73cb880d957ebc147d658f21c0318

on February 23, 2010
at 07:22 PM

This gets to be a tricky logical problem. I've had people ask me, "If Taubes knows a lot about obesity, why is he overweight?" Now that's just bad grammatical construction; it's not pointing out a contradiction. There are really two parts to that gibberish, a statement "Taubes knows a lot about obeisty," with which I agree, and a totally unrelated question, "Why is Taubes overweight?" and my answer is I don't know.

If their goal is to point out a contradiction to a Taubes' hypothesis, they'd have to say something like

If Taubes knows so much about obesity, then why has he said example of something contradicting the biological sciences? But they can't provide such an example.

It's almost as absurd as saying Beethoven couldn't know a lot about music, because he didn't listen to it much.

Or this,

If Phil Jackson knows so much about basketball, why was he only a journeyman bench player for the NY Knicks during his playing days.

48d73cb880d957ebc147d658f21c0318

(261)

on February 24, 2010
at 06:31 AM

You got me there, Melissa. I wasn't careful in my edit. A better response to the setup, "Why is Taubes overweight," would be, "I don't know, is he?" But the whole point is to avoid getting trapped in nonsensical disconnected gibberish posing as question.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 24, 2010
at 02:29 AM

Taubes doesn't look overweight to me... http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1197/1396892039_3072e4bb3a.jpg Not skinny though. Eades looked similar for a long time until he got really strict. I suspect that is Taubes' problem as well. Us young uns can cheat a little, but as you get older you really get punished .

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on November 03, 2010
at 11:19 AM

A friend of mine was seated next to Taubes at a dinner and said he seemed to be in very good shape.

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