1

votes

why don't carrots have a skin?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 18, 2013 at 2:05 AM

if the reason to avoid potato skin is to reduce lectin consumption (the intended purpose of which is to deter predators), I am wondering why the outer edge of carrots (and other root vegetables that don't require peeling) do not contain similar quanties of lectins. does it have to do with the water or sugar content (and how they affect desirability) of the vegetables in question? should i actually be peeling my carrots? thanks!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on April 01, 2013
at 05:41 PM

Yeah I mean they weren't orange until the Dutch made them that way like a hundred years ago, for obvious reasons

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on April 01, 2013
at 12:40 PM

Agreed. I'm not finding my source on this, but I seem to recall reading that the modern carrot is quite different than its ancient (notably not-orange) ancestor.

42cd0feeeda5fa2e2fe1c4fd8255073a

(1930)

on March 18, 2013
at 03:33 AM

I peel my carrots.. have always assumed that's what you do with carrots ??

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 18, 2013
at 02:38 AM

I'm guessing that the wild varieties are substantially more toxic and that we have been more successful in breeding it out or simply that carrots are more susceptible to infestation.

E687b5eb51456c9a0205aff406f44ca3

on March 18, 2013
at 02:36 AM

yes.. i said lectins mostly because they are present in both. i guess i am wondering why carrots don't need glycoalkaloids (or similar quantities of lectin) to protect themselves?

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5 Answers

1
7cf9f5b08a41ecf2a2d2bc0b31ea6fa0

on April 01, 2013
at 08:07 AM

If you're worried about the lectin content of carrots it might be safe to assume you have some kind of eating disorder

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 01, 2013
at 12:23 PM

Carrot and hemlock are in the same family (dun, dun, dun)... That said, thank goodness for selective plant breeding.

0
9e9f2a144af206c41c989ce09ef47554

on April 01, 2013
at 07:59 AM

Very interesting question. I have never thought about it before.

0
33266cca338ab54cee9a2aa160f5bdb6

on March 18, 2013
at 03:26 AM

I am not sure what chemicals are responsible, but carrots actually are anti-microbial. That being said, I don't think the anti-microbial compounds are toxic to us the way glycoalkaloids are.

0
Medium avatar

on March 18, 2013
at 02:31 AM

It's not the lectins in potatoes, it's the glycoalkaloids (specifically solanine) that are specific to the potato.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 18, 2013
at 02:38 AM

I'm guessing that the wild varieties are substantially more toxic and that we have been more successful in breeding it out or simply that carrots are more susceptible to infestation.

E687b5eb51456c9a0205aff406f44ca3

on March 18, 2013
at 02:36 AM

yes.. i said lectins mostly because they are present in both. i guess i am wondering why carrots don't need glycoalkaloids (or similar quantities of lectin) to protect themselves?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on April 01, 2013
at 05:41 PM

Yeah I mean they weren't orange until the Dutch made them that way like a hundred years ago, for obvious reasons

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on April 01, 2013
at 12:40 PM

Agreed. I'm not finding my source on this, but I seem to recall reading that the modern carrot is quite different than its ancient (notably not-orange) ancestor.

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