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How does fixing Vitamin deficiencies work?

Answered on November 24, 2013
Created November 24, 2013 at 3:32 PM

I'm confused as to how the body functions really. I mean say I am deficient in Vitamin D and A. A deficiency, is from not getting these over time, and since these are fat soluble the body stores them. So say I take 5,000 IU of each a day, but am deficient, will my stores start to rebuild or will my body just use all of it, right away? I guess overtime with consistency, even if it's using all of it, it will eventually catch up with itself, right? When the body uses something it doesn't just poof away? If it uses that 5,000 IU it will have it in use and with the more added will have even more, until degraded?

I don't get how non fat soluble vitamins work either...I mean if you don't get them daily do you become deficient cause they aren't stored?

Also, it wouldn't be good to take 200,000 iu of Vitamin Am even if one was super deficient, right? Cause the body just can't process that much at once, right?

I just wanna understand how to supplement and eat to fix my vitamin A and D in North America

Thanks! Hope this makes sense!

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(15)

on November 24, 2013
at 05:18 PM

Totally agree.

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2 Answers

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32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 24, 2013
at 04:20 PM

Just normalize your eating, that's all you need to do 99% of the time.

Medium avatar

(15)

on November 24, 2013
at 05:18 PM

Totally agree.

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Medium avatar

on November 24, 2013
at 04:15 PM

First, there's a lot of babble about vitamin D deficiency affecting all kinds of diseases, but the evidence on vitamin D supplementation is incredibly weak. There is one important thing many people seem to miss: Low blood vitamin D does not equal lack of vitamin D. The blood levels of vitamin D can go down in response to inflammation and as most of us know, inflammatory processes are the basis of many disorders. This phenomenon will lead to the observation Low blood vitamin D = higher disease risk, but the causes may lie in totally different things, unrelated to vitamin D.

Second, the positive health effects of (sun)light are far greater than its promotion of vitamin D production. Sunlight directly affects our mood and brain metabolism, modulates immune cells in the skin and energizes cells via its red light component. There is no good supplement for light, other than light.

Third, high dosing vitamins in isolation can bring a lot of things out of balance which may make things worse than better. Correct deficiencies slowly, prefer real foods and always supplement in balance (i.e. take vitamin D with adequate A, E and K).

In regard to your second question, most of the water solubles are retained sufficiently by the body (some better than others), so a short term deficiency will not lead to problems. I.e. vitamim B12 is stored for up to 2 years, thiamine for several weeks and also vitamin C deficiency will only develop after several weeks. What counts is consistency, maintaining a constant sufficient amount of vitamins, not in excess and not in deficiency.

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