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Any Paleo people in Singapore ?

Answered on March 24, 2016
Created July 17, 2012 at 6:12 AM

I have to move to Singapore for a few months. Please offer whatever advise you can about Paleo/Primal lifestyle in this city/country. Especially looking for advise about where to shop for Groceries, raw milk if available, grass-fed dairy/meat, kerrygold or equivalent butter etc. etc.

0f88641fb8088d0cdd1b5ef810b2d0a4

(146)

on November 18, 2012
at 08:14 PM

Oh dear that sounds terrible. You really missed out! Our famous hawker foods (eg chicken rice like Kotsii said, duck rice, bak kut teh, egg yolk squid, loads more!!) are not only delicious, they're also paleo friendly. (If you're not militant about the meat quality that is!) Maybe if you decide to visit again ;)

Ed0cb30f40daff568778b776b2a5a81d

(943)

on November 18, 2012
at 02:17 PM

Good post. Wish I've read before I got Sing on holiday. I had to spend a fair amount of days being hungry because I couldn't anything but those lousy food courts :)

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8 Answers

1
0f88641fb8088d0cdd1b5ef810b2d0a4

on November 18, 2012
at 11:25 AM

Hello, I'm a Singaporean teen with limited resources (no $, can't drive) but I have no problem in terms of basic paleo living. We're tropical & multiracial (mostly Chinese, Malay and Indian) so you won't have a problem with variety - lots of whole coconuts & its derivatives, seafood, tapioca, sweet potatoes, sweet potato flour, rice flour, ghee, curry leaves, spices, Asian veggies, etc available for cheap in normal supermarkets like NTUC. Might be wrong, but I hear seafood in particular is cheaper here than in other countries. Sashimi is everywhere so some days when I'm pressed for time I just grab a pack.

You might find that some things like organic condiments, almond butter, duck fat and certain cheeses are actually cheaper in higher-end supermarkets like Cold Storage or Jason's than normal supermarkets. Little India / Mustafa / Chinatown might be worth a visit too. For coconut milk minus stabilisers or preservatives go with the Aroy-D brand from Thailand, I get it in Chinatown.

You might also want to ask a local friend to bring you to the wet markets here where you can get good meat/seafood for a good price, from a trusted source (if you establish rapport with the seller). Hawker foods also feature lots of fatty meats, you can easily request for sauce on the side. We have farms that sell raw milk, organic produce, etc if you're willing to go the distance. List here: http://www.kiasuparents.com/kiasu/forum/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=26806.

The unfortunate thing is that there are hardly any paleo-specific brands or restaurants out there. If you're into paleo treats: http://naturesbakes.tumblr.com. If you're looking for high quality, eg grass-fed+organic beef, you'll have to source carefully and pay a little more. This list is super short but might be helpful: http://neverevereven.weebly.com/paleo-eats.html.

As for the paleo community, paleo is far from mainstream here. There are lots of gluten-free & clean-eating restaurants and labels though. Korean/Jap BBQ is great! RE: online, there're also a few blogs and a massive thread in a popular local forum.

Sorry if this seems like a completely random list, it's all off the top of my head! Have fun :-)

0f88641fb8088d0cdd1b5ef810b2d0a4

(146)

on November 18, 2012
at 08:14 PM

Oh dear that sounds terrible. You really missed out! Our famous hawker foods (eg chicken rice like Kotsii said, duck rice, bak kut teh, egg yolk squid, loads more!!) are not only delicious, they're also paleo friendly. (If you're not militant about the meat quality that is!) Maybe if you decide to visit again ;)

Ed0cb30f40daff568778b776b2a5a81d

(943)

on November 18, 2012
at 02:17 PM

Good post. Wish I've read before I got Sing on holiday. I had to spend a fair amount of days being hungry because I couldn't anything but those lousy food courts :)

0
7a6db43f74208d76700e268f29beee59

on March 24, 2016
at 04:36 AM

Hello, I have been paleo for 3 years now.

I usually get my meat from Cold storage as it is quite fresh there.

For vegetables, i go the wet market and especially during early mornings to get the freshest produce.I cook my veggies with minimal olive oil and maybe throw in some roasted garlic for an extra kick.

For yoghurt, i have been using Alvas Natural Yoghurt for close to 5 years and it is made by a local dairy company.The Alvas yoghurt does not have any preservatives, fillers and additives so its quite rare to find a yoghurt as pure like that.It doesn't hurt too that it is the best tasting yoghurt I can find in Singapore, very rich, thick and creamy.you can get the yoghurt from Sheng Siong.

0
1ccde1974eba63a86304f971044777cc

on June 10, 2013
at 03:52 AM

from what i know, Singapore does not allow raw milk - all milk has to be pasteurised >:// and so even getting milk direct from the farms (listed in the kiasuparents forum) isn't going to get us raw milk :S

0
F907531cc916e3f705a37eca5e8939b4

on June 04, 2013
at 07:40 AM

I tried to find free range eggs but the closest I got to was "freedom-range" eggs. As you said, the government does not allow poultry to be raised outdoors (very illogical to me...).

Paleorina http://paleorina.com

0
A90dfb3c8b984191d8102ccfc0203e90

on December 31, 2012
at 12:24 PM

Local here, though I'm still a teenager so I get my 'rents to buy the paleo groceries and make some compromises when eating out.

I don't take butter but Anchor is a decently-priced grass-fed one. Meats, go to www.qbfood.com.sg or head to their retail store, it's the most reasonably priced beef I have ever found, bar none. Plus it's grass-fed. Even the grain-fed ones in supermarkets are way more expensive. Extra virgin coconut oil can be found at Fairprice Finest, Cold Storage, or (my personal favourite) Country Farm Organics. For other meats like pork, chicken or offal and seafood, get a local to bring you to the wet markets where you can get pretty good bargains. If your market buddy knows the owner well you can even get really great discounts and sometimes they throw in spare parts no one really wants (e.g. lard, chicken butt - great for drawing out natural oils) for free. Vegetables are quite fresh too, leafy Asian greens are usually cheaper than things like broccoli and cauliflower. If you take yogurt, a good brand that can be found at Sheng Shiong is called Alvas yogurt and it's made locally so it's quite fresh. Indians use it in their cooking and it's really really rich and thick, like Greek yogurt, really cheap too although the packaging does seem a bit shoddy. It's quite hard to find organic things though - but if you really want to, Brown Rice Paradise at expat-haven Tanglin Mall is the most value-for-money I've been to - and even if you do, it's expensive, so I don't bother.

Eating out, meats usually aren't grass-fed or pastured (the govt doesn't allow poultry raised outdoors to be brought in) but you can normally find meats at a pretty cheap price even at hawker centers. Roast pork - avoid the barbecued ones that look artificially coloured, roast chicken, steamed chicken, fish soup, half-boiled eggs, satay, Western stall steaks etc. Just tell them to hold the oil and sauce. You can get boiled leafy vegetables at the 'yong tau foo' stall though it is served with a soybean/anchovy-based soup. Lots of good bone broths as well, look for 'double-boiled soups' that are usually made with a variety of Chinese medicinal herbs and pork bones or chicken bones. If you tolerate white rice you're going to love it here, especially the congees, chicken rice, rice noodles etc. Japanese/Korean restaurants usually have a variety of grilled meats too but it's more expensive than hawker centers or padang stalls. You can always ask hawkers or restaurants not to serve the rice, bread etc. and they normally give you more meat that way.

Hope that helps. :) If you have any questions feel free to ask.

0
59e818af2184847f09c8a63a45adcdbb

on December 31, 2012
at 02:01 AM

I live in Singapore, being paleo here is quite straigh-forward, though some items are hard to find(organic liver, even regular lambs liver) or expensive(coconut oil though i found a reasonably priced one in Cold storage of all places..)

0
Ac1be7d044a82c85cee039f3435a550f

(150)

on November 18, 2012
at 03:17 PM

Singaporean here too, just started a few months back so I'm still exploring. The good thing is like what Charmaine said, fatty meats/organs/coconut items are quite easily available. If you're willing to travel (and preferably if you have a local friend who knows the area) Little India is overflowing with spices and fresh products, so raw ingredients should not be a problem. Also, if you need processed foodstuff, ingredients are usually written in English. Be prepared to spend some time to find the suitable brands though.

Now, the not so good: besides specialist butcheries, not many places actually know their products that well, looking for grass-fed meats may pose a problem. Eating out will most likley require compromise, almost all commercially-used cooking oils are vegetable-based. Also, sugar/soy/flour can pop up in the most surprising of places, especially if you are having chinese food (soy sauce is the number one condiment, bar none).

Suggestions:

a) If you are just looking for organic meats, Meat the Grocer (615 Bukit Timah Road) does carry a range, and the staff is quite friendly as well. The NTUC supermarket at City Square Mall basement (Ferrer Park mrt) also carries organic pork.

b) Eating out: Generally, the more expensive the place, the more likely you'll find someone who knows what went into the food (or has the initiative to ask). Japanese food will probably be the most convenient, followed by salad bars that allow you to choose your own ingredients. For food courts/hawker centres, you can try going for roast meats stalls, they usually have items like roast duck, roast pork belly, roast chicken. These are usually roasted with salt and other spices. Recommend avoiding the char siew (that's the bright red one) though, no idea what goes into the marinate that causes the colour. Check out Chinese soup stalls too, some do various double-boiled soups, bak kut teh (herbal pork ribs soup), mixed organs soups. Some Indian stalls specialize in mutton soup and tulang (bone marrow) as well. All-day brunch places are also gaining popularity, so those are possible considerations. If you can tolerate rice, chicken rice is one of our famous dishes! The rice is cooked with chicken fat, so it's bonus points. Just tell them to hold the sauce and oil (soya sauce and sesame oil is usually liberally applied before serving).

c) Snacking: Stalls selling cut fruits are also quite common, but the smaller fruits like apples are usually pre-soaked in a weak brine to prevent browning. If you don't mind some honey in your snacks, we have quite a lot of shops selling bak kwa (barbequed dried meats). These are usually found in shopping centres, and in Chinatown. Also, there's a large number of kaya toast places. While the main star isn't for us paleo folks, they do sell soft-boiled eggs in pairs, so it's convenient for a quick snack. Though I'd still say avoid them if you have gluten allergy, just to be safe.

Good luck with the shift here :)

0
75892359de79339c232fb93e47755912

on August 21, 2012
at 03:02 AM

Anchor is a pretty good brand for grass-fed butter, as for grass-fed beef, you might have to order it online to be sure...

http://www.qbfood.com.sg/path/index.php?cPath=37

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