2

votes

What sickness can you work through on your own and which ones require medicine?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 11, 2012 at 1:51 PM

I honestly don't remember the last time I visited a family physician or ingested an antibiotic because most of my common colds, stomach bugs, etc I've been able to work through on my own with time, rest, good food, and some holistic medicines. However, my son recently tested positive for strep throat and I woke up this morning with a sore throat and feeling lethargic. If I do have strep, it will be the first time since I was 13 years old, so I began to wonder if I am able to take the same approach as I do with cold's and flu's with the strep throat or is this something I must get tested for and consume antibiotics. Then I began to wonder what other common sickness require medical care and prescription drugs and which ones can the body appropriate handle itself. So out of the list below (I'm sure this list can be added to) what are your thoughts on self healing versus medical:

Cold
Flu
Strep Throat
Pink Eye
Ear infection
Sinus infection
Upper respiratory infection
seasonal allergies
Croup
Viral Infection

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 11, 2012
at 08:42 PM

P.S. Breast milk is excellent for eye infections.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 11, 2012
at 08:41 PM

I think identifying as someone "who doesn't go to the doctor" is a defense people use when they don't want to know, or fear it would prove they are only human. There is a real justifiable fear of getting sucked into an endless loop of pharmaceuticals if you go in there unprepared, but you are allowed to make your own decisions about which course of action to pursue. Not checking the oil isn't a good way to take care of a car, and the human equivalent of refusing to go to the doctor probably isn't a good idea either. Safer just to check, rather than developing a brain or kidney infection.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 11, 2012
at 07:08 PM

Also @jenniflower using potent compounds from plants is the basis of most medicines we use today (aspirin, morphine, antibiotics etc). Natural remedies are medicine IF they have proved efficacy (big if).

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 11, 2012
at 07:06 PM

Yeah, UTI's you need to say super on top of. If you are not treating it, at least make sure you get it monitored by a doctor if the duration is longer than typical, or if you've noticed any changes in symptoms. One of my friends had to drop out in the middle of a semester at university, and now has compromised fertility because of an untreated UTI. You don't want to mess around.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 11, 2012
at 07:03 PM

I agree, the really big problem with bacterial infections is that you don't know how dangerous they can be until it is too late to easily treat. It is such a toss-up, but I think the short-term damage of taking antibiotics beats out the possibility of long term damage from a bacterial infection.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 11, 2012
at 07:02 PM

I second Jaych: Cranberry juice is often touted as a cure, when there have been no definitive studies proving its effectiveness vs placebo. The compound in cranberry juice, D-Mannose, is often taken to prevent UTI's, but not cure them. Again, if left untreated, a simple UTI can spread to the kidneys causing serious complications. Also, you may not know the reasons for getting them. I used to get them several times a year due to kidney stones forming and causing small tears in my urinary tract as they passed. For years I'd had no idea about the cause, just thought I was prone to getting them.

4b05d725a8332e8e917a4ca58b6e8a1e

(1239)

on April 11, 2012
at 06:16 PM

On the subject of UTIs, I have to caution against trying to treat them exclusively at home. After being hospitalized for a serious kidney infection as a result of an untreated UTi, I most certainly take those much more seriously that I used to (luckily, I haven't had a UTI since that incident five years ago...so I fully suspect that my changed diet has done wonders for my immune system).

F80aaa96354eb749a8a5efdda3feba7d

(457)

on April 11, 2012
at 05:37 PM

No it may not be modern medicine but it is natural and with that cones natural ways to fight disease. I had a parasite and instead of taking something that would tear me up inside I went the cloves, wormwood, black Hull route. No need to take medicine for everything.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 11, 2012
at 02:47 PM

Not to mention that the Streptococcus bacteria, if left untreated, can travel to your kidneys, resulting in a very dangerous infection termed "post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis". Bad stuff, man.

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6 Answers

9
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 11, 2012
at 06:50 PM

Eating right and exercising will only make you less susceptible and better able to fight off infections, both bacterial and viral. A Paleo lifestyle will not cure them.

Up until the invention of antibiotics, infections killed a LOT of people. The Bubonic plague which devastated Europe and Asia could have been cured with a simple round of antibiotics.

One thing which the Paleolithic did not have going for it was its medicinal and surgical practices. The reason why certain herbs were used for certain things was because a handful of people noticed that they made certain illnesses better. Not all of the time, though. Besides, they usually left that stuff up to a medicine man/woman, not the average cavedude. If I've got an infected boil on my leg, I'm not going to rely on herbal poultices and teas to heal it. I'm going to the f'ing doctor to have it lanced and get antibiotics to treat it.

7
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 11, 2012
at 03:29 PM

Speaking in generalities, viral stuff usually runs its course, bacterial stuff can be persistent. Get antibiotics if you have a bacterial infection. Gauge the risk of long-term damage. A cold, low long-term risk. Pink-eye - possible blindness, seek medical attention.

It bears saying again and again: paleo is not anti-modern medicine.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 11, 2012
at 07:03 PM

I agree, the really big problem with bacterial infections is that you don't know how dangerous they can be until it is too late to easily treat. It is such a toss-up, but I think the short-term damage of taking antibiotics beats out the possibility of long term damage from a bacterial infection.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 11, 2012
at 07:08 PM

Also @jenniflower using potent compounds from plants is the basis of most medicines we use today (aspirin, morphine, antibiotics etc). Natural remedies are medicine IF they have proved efficacy (big if).

F80aaa96354eb749a8a5efdda3feba7d

(457)

on April 11, 2012
at 05:37 PM

No it may not be modern medicine but it is natural and with that cones natural ways to fight disease. I had a parasite and instead of taking something that would tear me up inside I went the cloves, wormwood, black Hull route. No need to take medicine for everything.

7
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 11, 2012
at 02:19 PM

Don't mess around with strep throat. Modern medicine is really quite useful sometimes - get tested, make sure they do a real throat culture, get medicine if you need it, and do a course of probiotics or other helpful techniques to restore health after the medicine course if needed.

I nearly lost my hearing from being misdiagnosed as not having strep throat. That was the scariest two weeks of my life - my hearing went from normal to nearly completely muted. I went back to the doctor, and they asked why I didn't come in earlier. When I reminded them that I had, and that they decided a test wasn't necessary, they quickly threw some nasal steroids at me, which eventually returned my hearing.

Then there's pink eye. Bacterial, viral, or fungal - that's also the order of painfulness of the various conjunctivitis. I had viral conjunctivitis once. It was insanely horrible. I can't imagine what fungal feels like. If you get the common one (bacterial), at least go to the doctor for everyone else's sake -- you don't want to be spreading that around.

Now, on the other hand, the few times I've gotten colds or the flu in the last decade or so, I've just grinned and bore it.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 11, 2012
at 02:47 PM

Not to mention that the Streptococcus bacteria, if left untreated, can travel to your kidneys, resulting in a very dangerous infection termed "post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis". Bad stuff, man.

3
06bf7b92d77f1ac1d8e3dc9d539d8254

on April 11, 2012
at 08:07 PM

Depends... If you follow PHD (Paul Jaminet), he believes that nearly all chronic diseases stem from long term infection. If that is the case then you might not want to just let it go. On the other hand you have the folks that think antibiotics are the anti christ and would never hear of taking them. Personally, If I were to get sick I would let the sickness run its course for a week or so, being sure to get TONS of rest. If it has not resolved itself in that time I would then seek out modern medicine. Sure a week on antibiotics could permanently ruin your microbiota, but at the same time, an ignored infection could turn in to a chronic disease. Weigh your pros and cons.

Also, I would add, doctors are extremely educated.. use them as a resource and if nothing else a sounding board. When I do see my doctor I throw tons of questions at her and she always offers moderate insight. Keep in mind that simply contributing to this forum puts you on the "fringe," and fringe thinking can be infectious... pun intended.

3
35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on April 11, 2012
at 07:39 PM

I'm wary at throwing too much antibiotics at strep throat since I did that in high school and ended up with an antibiotic resistant strep throat infection, the treatment for which landed me in the ER with complications. With most common infections I keep an eye on symptoms and as soon as they appear to be getting WORSE, I get myself to a doctor.

The exception being mastitis. I'm a big proponent of immediate antibiotic treatment for mastitis since moms are usually weakened for a few months after childbirth, low on sleep and sometimes having weird immune, hormone or emotional issues. No need to complicate that with a potentially deadly infection.

1
F80aaa96354eb749a8a5efdda3feba7d

on April 11, 2012
at 05:43 PM

Some bacteria problems can be healed through diet alone. For example numerous women will tell you that just drinking cranberry juice helps their uti's. I personally tend to give whatever I'm coming down with a week with my natural remedies and then if it's no better see a doctor. You should be able to Google antibiotic diets. Up your levels of vitamin c to help your immune system, and vitamin d. In addition to upping your probiotic to keep your gut clean. If you do take the antibiotics make sure you take extra probiotics as the antibiotics are going to strip your gut to nothingness.

4b05d725a8332e8e917a4ca58b6e8a1e

(1239)

on April 11, 2012
at 06:16 PM

On the subject of UTIs, I have to caution against trying to treat them exclusively at home. After being hospitalized for a serious kidney infection as a result of an untreated UTi, I most certainly take those much more seriously that I used to (luckily, I haven't had a UTI since that incident five years ago...so I fully suspect that my changed diet has done wonders for my immune system).

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 11, 2012
at 07:06 PM

Yeah, UTI's you need to say super on top of. If you are not treating it, at least make sure you get it monitored by a doctor if the duration is longer than typical, or if you've noticed any changes in symptoms. One of my friends had to drop out in the middle of a semester at university, and now has compromised fertility because of an untreated UTI. You don't want to mess around.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on April 11, 2012
at 07:02 PM

I second Jaych: Cranberry juice is often touted as a cure, when there have been no definitive studies proving its effectiveness vs placebo. The compound in cranberry juice, D-Mannose, is often taken to prevent UTI's, but not cure them. Again, if left untreated, a simple UTI can spread to the kidneys causing serious complications. Also, you may not know the reasons for getting them. I used to get them several times a year due to kidney stones forming and causing small tears in my urinary tract as they passed. For years I'd had no idea about the cause, just thought I was prone to getting them.

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