0

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anyone here cured winged shoulders?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 03, 2012 at 2:01 AM

I have been in pt for a year now. My shoulders wing laterally and medially. Im starting to lose hope and would like to hear some success stories.

7f7069fc4d8d2456cec509d0f9e9bb34

(865)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:06 PM

What they have not addressed, most likely is the other, tight/triggerpoint side of the issue. You most likely have tightness and triggerpoints in your Pec Minor/Major, upper traps, and Serratus anterior, all of which protract and elevate your scapula (wing it). My advice would be to find a (good) neuromuscular massage therapist to help you address and reeducate the tight areas as well as continue the strengthening (retraction and depression) exercises that the PT has you doing. Probably the PT is only addressing half of the issue.

7f7069fc4d8d2456cec509d0f9e9bb34

(865)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:01 PM

Not trying to show off, just be specific. What most people commonly refer to as the shoulder is the glenohumeral joint, where the humerus attaches to the glenoid fossa of the scapula. The scapula is actually freely floating (except for the attachment to the clavicle) and his held in place by soft tissue (muscle and fascia) on all sides and glides on the ribs. As for the winged issue, it is caused by a muscle imbalance in this soft tissue holding the scapula. Your rhomboids, lower traps, and deep neck flexors need to be strengthened, but I am sure you know this from your year in PT.

Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on June 03, 2012
at 02:32 PM

The shoulder is a joint. The scapula is the shoulder blade, which is a bone. Definitely not the same thing.

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on June 03, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Shoulder =scapula Are you just trying to show off here. Believe me I know what a scapula us!

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on June 03, 2012
at 02:19 PM

Do I have to spell it out? Shoulders and scapulae...same thing. Jesus. Also m

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on June 03, 2012
at 02:17 PM

Vertically and horizontally

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2 Answers

2
7f7069fc4d8d2456cec509d0f9e9bb34

(865)

on June 03, 2012
at 02:51 AM

Laterally and Medially are opposite movements. Do you mean Laterally and Superiorly? And do you mean your Scapulae? I work with this, but saying your shoulders wing laterally and medially is meaningless.

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on June 03, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Shoulder =scapula Are you just trying to show off here. Believe me I know what a scapula us!

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on June 03, 2012
at 02:17 PM

Vertically and horizontally

Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on June 03, 2012
at 02:32 PM

The shoulder is a joint. The scapula is the shoulder blade, which is a bone. Definitely not the same thing.

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on June 03, 2012
at 02:19 PM

Do I have to spell it out? Shoulders and scapulae...same thing. Jesus. Also m

7f7069fc4d8d2456cec509d0f9e9bb34

(865)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:06 PM

What they have not addressed, most likely is the other, tight/triggerpoint side of the issue. You most likely have tightness and triggerpoints in your Pec Minor/Major, upper traps, and Serratus anterior, all of which protract and elevate your scapula (wing it). My advice would be to find a (good) neuromuscular massage therapist to help you address and reeducate the tight areas as well as continue the strengthening (retraction and depression) exercises that the PT has you doing. Probably the PT is only addressing half of the issue.

7f7069fc4d8d2456cec509d0f9e9bb34

(865)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:01 PM

Not trying to show off, just be specific. What most people commonly refer to as the shoulder is the glenohumeral joint, where the humerus attaches to the glenoid fossa of the scapula. The scapula is actually freely floating (except for the attachment to the clavicle) and his held in place by soft tissue (muscle and fascia) on all sides and glides on the ribs. As for the winged issue, it is caused by a muscle imbalance in this soft tissue holding the scapula. Your rhomboids, lower traps, and deep neck flexors need to be strengthened, but I am sure you know this from your year in PT.

1
E2db1519690001648433e8109eb2c013

on June 03, 2012
at 10:21 PM

Massage and corrective exercises may help with the effects of your shoulder coordination.

Real change will involve the organization of your whole body in ways you can't anticipate. For your shoulders to sit 'correctly,' your ribs and back have to be there for them to sit on, which means you hips need to be active and mobile in ways that require your feet and legs to be engaged correctly.

Did I forget to mention that this all depends on how your eyes-inner ears-neck muscles combine to activate the reflexes that make all this work together?

The only method I know of that works on all of this together is Alexander: http://www.stat.org.uk/index.htm

I had a hypermobile left shoulder, which is now 'stable' enough for hand-stands. My collar bones used to stand out like suitcase handles, now they are integrated with my ribs.

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