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Buying Pastured Eggs and Meat in France/Paris

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 05, 2012 at 11:05 PM

I have moved to Paris for a while and I'm just getting started at settling in. I have two questions: are there places that I could by pastured beef, eggs, and milk? And then...what are the French terms that are used to describe something as pastured and/or grass-fed? Are they direct translations? I can find cage free organic eggs just fine, but I have no idea what to look for when looking for "pastured".

At the moment I buy a lot of my stuff at the Sunday bio market at Blvd. Raspail. Is there interest for grassfed/pastured eggs and meat in France generally? I know there are a lot of traditional farms, but that is kind of general. I'd like to understand if anyone specifically engages in grassfed/pastured farming for health or if there is a demand?

Also, are most butchers easy to get bones (for broth) from? I see that liver seems to be insanely popular here, that's nice!

Merci!

8add4b2b2c194d8238244988fc889699

(0)

on January 06, 2014
at 01:57 PM

Thanks, I will look into bio c'est bon. That's unfortunate about the organic label in France. If you find any good farmers please let me know. In answer to your question, I don't eat meat, but I do drink bone broth but in Paris I haven't found any butchers willing to sell bones yet. Thanks for your reply, let me know if you find anything.

Medium avatar

(0)

on January 06, 2014
at 01:46 PM

Eggs are better and cheaper in bio c'est bon. Where do you buy your meat?

02ed11dd6b1f6b3add337b8c3c48014a

(10)

on September 30, 2013
at 12:37 PM

and if you come to the Southeast, try this place, which serves paleo food: lagorcerocks.com :)

D5dff6376e17373751ccf4a10aaa0b34

(274)

on March 07, 2012
at 11:38 AM

Ok, thanks. In the US too, a lot of cows are grassfed, as it's cheaper to have them graze. However, they are brought to feedlots for fattening and processing. The marbling in beef here seems to indicate that there is some fattening happening before market. Is that not true? Are there EU regulations on raising beef? I guess I should research that and start to answer my own question!

D5dff6376e17373751ccf4a10aaa0b34

(274)

on March 06, 2012
at 11:18 AM

ok, excellent, thanks for the info!

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5 Answers

2
Ef089e1180f240aa9fd2d089f7f38b45

(279)

on March 06, 2012
at 12:13 AM

In France, you can find organic meat/egg/butter in any decent groceries store (it's organic if "bio". Otherwise, "label rouge" means high standards though not necessarily organic - though by US standard I'm sure it's super-organic). However this does not mean the nutrition is 100% grass-fed, for that I would go around butchers and ask if animals were pasture raised only (??lev??es en p??turages exclusivement). I don't have any butchers address to give you since I'm usually ok with "just" organic certification when I go there, but Paris is bound to be butcher friendly...

D5dff6376e17373751ccf4a10aaa0b34

(274)

on March 06, 2012
at 11:18 AM

ok, excellent, thanks for the info!

0
Medium avatar

on January 06, 2014
at 01:43 PM

I personally prefer bio c'est bon to naturalia as it is a little bit cheaper. Especially eggs. Label rouge or bio doesn't mean that animals are grassfed. They feed them with organic grain and consider that it is bio. I don't trust bio label in France and would like to find a local farmer in Paris region. Any suggestions?

8add4b2b2c194d8238244988fc889699

(0)

on January 06, 2014
at 01:57 PM

Thanks, I will look into bio c'est bon. That's unfortunate about the organic label in France. If you find any good farmers please let me know. In answer to your question, I don't eat meat, but I do drink bone broth but in Paris I haven't found any butchers willing to sell bones yet. Thanks for your reply, let me know if you find anything.

0
8add4b2b2c194d8238244988fc889699

on January 03, 2014
at 04:45 PM

Did you ever find a good place to buy bones in Paris? I have asked quite a few butchers in my area and got some pretty weird looks and no luck. Also I normally get regular organic eggs from naturalia without thinking too much about it, did you find anything substantially higher quality? I'm not familiar with this site so if possible please email me at mkolleen@gmail.com warm regards, mako

Medium avatar

(0)

on January 06, 2014
at 01:46 PM

Eggs are better and cheaper in bio c'est bon. Where do you buy your meat?

0
15cd565cec4fe423d3661b873af6fad0

on June 19, 2012
at 04:25 PM

ambrews your suspicions are correct. In France almost all beef is grain-finished. Try grass-finishing a Blonde d'Aquitaine!

What Wedzir is pointing out is that French beef is likely to be a culled cow of 4-10 years. That is way older than any US beef. US beef is usually under 2 years of age. In the US, culled cows make hamburger meat. A retired mother cow of 10 years of age has eaten a lot of grass in its life. Still, she'll get a lot of grain to be finished and spent that finishing time in a pen indoors and that messes with the meat pretty quick.

In the US when you get a steak you will likely be getting a steer (castrated male) but in France you will get a fattened retired mother cow. The male calves in France usually go to feedlots in Italy and Spain. They are the premium product but they aren't eaten here in France.

US beef is also mostly feedlot beef where the young animals spend some months in a facility where they are fattened up in large numbers. France has its feedlots up north where you Parisians are. I’m not sure of the percentages but there’s less feedlot beef here than in the USA.

Good luck in your search. If you ever make it to the Southwest you should check out our beef herd.

02ed11dd6b1f6b3add337b8c3c48014a

(10)

on September 30, 2013
at 12:37 PM

and if you come to the Southeast, try this place, which serves paleo food: lagorcerocks.com :)

0
4290b251413da20f5524202e302625b6

on March 06, 2012
at 01:23 PM

In Europe almost all the meat and milk products come from grassfed cows. They are out in the field for most of the year and during the winter season the are typically fed dried grass/hay. During that time they can be fed some extra foodpellets. All the butter comes from those cows and is typically grassfed :). The egss you buy can come from a variety of places, productionmethods but here in the Netherlands that is pretty well labeled. (although there is a commercial interest to label as green as possible to sell more so a bit of caution is neccesary

D5dff6376e17373751ccf4a10aaa0b34

(274)

on March 07, 2012
at 11:38 AM

Ok, thanks. In the US too, a lot of cows are grassfed, as it's cheaper to have them graze. However, they are brought to feedlots for fattening and processing. The marbling in beef here seems to indicate that there is some fattening happening before market. Is that not true? Are there EU regulations on raising beef? I guess I should research that and start to answer my own question!

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