3

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Can Paleo fix tooth sensitivity? If yes, how exactly?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 09, 2011 at 8:08 AM

I've searched on PH, but people here mostly talked about cavities and gum sensitivities. I'm interested in actual tooth sensitivity (sensitive to the touch, hot, or cold). Can Paleo fix these? How exactly?

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 01, 2014
at 05:49 AM

Won't it stain the teeth? I totally love green tea, drink it a lot, but it stains my teeth terribly (not as much as black tea, though.) I have to drink it with a straw...

Cloves tasting rough? Maybe you have put too much of it in the tea - I love the taste of gloves, sometimes I would chew on it, it leaves the mouth with a great taste and smell. However, if I put 2 or 3 in my mouth, it is very strong and not nice.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on November 09, 2011
at 11:59 PM

An update. I supplemented with calcium, magnesium, K2 Mk7 and D3 5000IU last night, and this morning again, and the sensitivity has gone away. Maybe I need to keep this regime for a few weeks so the tooth can actually heal enough to not feel sensitive again. Please note that I did take this kind of supplementation before, but not consistently, and not in as high numbers. E.g. I might have taken calcium 3x a week, magnesium 2x a week, K2 2x a week, D3 once a week. I probably need to take these up daily from now on for some time... Same regime as this person: http://t.co/22qZsGIU

69f23639eff20502bf68758d4def29c9

on November 09, 2011
at 10:02 PM

baking soda is less abrasive than the most sensitive toothpaste, only water is less abrasive than it.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 09, 2011
at 04:36 PM

Pineapple hurts my tongue but I haven't had problems with acidic fruit making my teeth tender. I do have the mild sensitivity or aching when I chew meat that is less tender several meals in a row (a good reason to slow cook.) Really cold water can do the same.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 09, 2011
at 04:35 PM

Pineapple hurts my tongue but I haven't had problems with acidic fruit. I do have the mild sensitivity or aching when I chew meat that is less tender. Really cold water can do the same.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on November 09, 2011
at 09:46 AM

Some more info: I used to use a sensitivity toothpaste, which worked, but I moved to a baking soda-based one (no fluoride) a week ago. Today, the sensitivity started again. The last time I had stopped the sensitivity toothpaste for a more generic one, it also took a week to feel the sensitivity back on my tooth. I have since gone Paleo 2 months ago, and I think I'm better (my teeth are not as transparent anymore), but the sensitivity seems to be coming back. I take Calcium, magnesium, D3 and K2-Mk7 a few times a week (not every day), and I eat goat dairy only (and always lactose-free).

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8 Answers

3
Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 09, 2011
at 07:41 PM

Weston A. Price (the namesake of the Weston A. Price Foundation) was a dentist by trade and much of his work focuses on the dental health of traditional societies vs "civilized" ones.

According to his findings, traditional diets provide the nutrients (vitamins, minerals, co-factors, etc.) required for "remineralization" to occur. The idea is that even caries (cavities) can be reversed through proper diet (although the caveat is that your early childhood diet, and the diet of your mother, grandmother, etc. has either a protective or negative effect as well) but this would include tooth sensitivity (thin enamel, cracks, cavities, etc.) as well.

I think this sums it up pretty well...

can-paleo-fix-tooth-sensitivity?-if-yes,-how-exactly?

Fat-soluble vitamins A, D, & K and their role in health (including dental health)

Discussion of the WAP-based book "Cure tooth decay"

Vitamin C and its relationship to the current tooth decay model

2
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on November 09, 2011
at 09:58 PM

Green tea mouthrinse and swishing works well. You can also add cloves to this mouthrinse for sensitivty but the taste is rough.....

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 01, 2014
at 05:49 AM

Won't it stain the teeth? I totally love green tea, drink it a lot, but it stains my teeth terribly (not as much as black tea, though.) I have to drink it with a straw...

Cloves tasting rough? Maybe you have put too much of it in the tea - I love the taste of gloves, sometimes I would chew on it, it leaves the mouth with a great taste and smell. However, if I put 2 or 3 in my mouth, it is very strong and not nice.

2
1d9af5db8833413037be3ac48964714f

on November 09, 2011
at 02:20 PM

My teeth are a lot less sensitive. I used to get tooth pain fairly often in various parts of my mouth, but no more. They feel stronger (not sure if that's the right word, but they simply feel like they are more solid and resistant). My gums also used to bleed when I brushed my teeth, but no longer.

Another weird change is tooth spacing. I used to get stuff stuck between my teeth all the time, especially meat. Now I eat more meat than I used to, but food almost never gets stuck anymore. It feels like they are more evenly spaced in my jaw somehow.

A couple of months ago my mom asked me if I had had my teeth whitened. Nope.

These were changes I never really expected from paleo, but they are quite nice.

I do take a vitamin K2 supplement (MK 4 and MK 7) and D3 when I don't get sunshine. That's supposed to help.

1
A1a0baccef58499acf9ceb3c874997f2

on November 09, 2011
at 05:00 PM

I know some folks who have had a lot of success with oil pulling (swishing with oil on an empty stomach for about 15 minutes a day). It may be worth a try, as it is relatively inexpensive, and most likely, very safe.

1
27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on November 09, 2011
at 03:18 PM

If your paleo diet includes more acidic fruits or more salsa (vinegar/lime juice) or things like olives/pickles/prepared horseradish-- you could experience additional sensitivity. The easy fix is simply rinse your mouth with a spoonful of baking soda in water. I also brush with baking soda and then rinse with warm salt water.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 09, 2011
at 04:35 PM

Pineapple hurts my tongue but I haven't had problems with acidic fruit. I do have the mild sensitivity or aching when I chew meat that is less tender. Really cold water can do the same.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 09, 2011
at 04:36 PM

Pineapple hurts my tongue but I haven't had problems with acidic fruit making my teeth tender. I do have the mild sensitivity or aching when I chew meat that is less tender several meals in a row (a good reason to slow cook.) Really cold water can do the same.

1
4aea637def16d0b25b17fb69fd651a0b

on November 09, 2011
at 10:58 AM

My teeth seem much less sensitive. I think it is because my gums are healthier after removing sugars and excess carbs from my diet. I think the gums are covering more of the really sensitive bits.

My teeth are cleaner too.

1
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on November 09, 2011
at 09:29 AM

I've noticed my teeth seem less sensitive after ditching toothpaste and brushing with baking soda instead. At this point I don't notice any sensitivity at all.

Edit: Ok, I tried to reply to your comment, but I'm getting an error message that I can only post 20 comments per hour and I should be able to post again in X minutes... Then when X minutes is up, the error shows up again.

Ahem, anyway...

What I was going to say is there seems to be a difference between plain baking soda and baking soda based toothpaste. I really don't know why - perhaps one of the other ingredients in the toothpaste? But I seem to have far better results from plain baking soda.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on November 09, 2011
at 09:46 AM

Some more info: I used to use a sensitivity toothpaste, which worked, but I moved to a baking soda-based one (no fluoride) a week ago. Today, the sensitivity started again. The last time I had stopped the sensitivity toothpaste for a more generic one, it also took a week to feel the sensitivity back on my tooth. I have since gone Paleo 2 months ago, and I think I'm better (my teeth are not as transparent anymore), but the sensitivity seems to be coming back. I take Calcium, magnesium, D3 and K2-Mk7 a few times a week (not every day), and I eat goat dairy only (and always lactose-free).

69f23639eff20502bf68758d4def29c9

on November 09, 2011
at 10:02 PM

baking soda is less abrasive than the most sensitive toothpaste, only water is less abrasive than it.

0
Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on November 09, 2011
at 08:18 PM

With my last filling, I had pretty major sensitivity afterwards, even several months later to touch and temperature changes. The dentist offered to redo the filling and pack "medicine" beneath the filling to help temper the nerves, but I instead opted to wait it out. I continued to eat paleo, brush with a baking-soda-based tooth powder, and switched my fish oil supplement for a butter-oil/FCLO blend which is supposed to assist in re-mineralization.

I still have some sensitivity on occasion, but it's now only during much larger temperature changes, and the sensitivity to touch is pretty much gone as well. It's been about a year since the filling, so at this point, I'm considering the waiting option to have been successful.

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